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#156947 A Comment About All The Negativity

Posted GS_Dirtboy on 23 April 2012 - 03:33 PM

Sometimes when I read the posts on this site the negativity against/about Argentina comes oozing out of the screen like black slime.  I've been here since 2006 so I've had a bit of time here and perhaps I can share some thoughts that might be helpful.  

I went through the same negative phase the first year I was here.  I couldn't help but compare what I was experiencing here to the life I knew in the States.  "Why is this country so $*%!@# up?" I kept asking.  Why does it take 12 weeks to get a working phone/internet line in my apartment?  Why do I need to stand in line for 2 hours at the bank just to pay a bill?  Why can't people drive in their own lane?  Why?  Why?  Why?

The answer is because this is Argentina.  That is the way it is here.
Are the politics pretty screwed up?  Yes
Is there an issue with security?  Yes
Is the government and police forces corrupt?  Yes
Are all the trash cans invisible?  Yes
Is there a big disparity between rich and poor? Yes (have you been to the US recently?)
etc, etc, etc  

But ...
Is this an absolutely beautiful country?  Yes
Does Argentina have a rich cultural heritage?  Yes
Are the women (and men) here gorgeous?  Yes
Does Argentina have a highly educated population?  Yes
Does BsAs have extraordinary public transport?  Yes

If you get stuck on finding all the negatives you'll miss out on what is truly extraordinary about this place.  It's like going to China, rolling your eyes at the food and eating at McDonald's, instead.  

I suggest getting yourself involved in your community.  If you can't stand CK's policies go volunteer your time to help another political party.  If you can't stand the litter on the street start a community clean-up project.  If the city is getting to you go visit other parts of Argentina.  I've been to every provence by motorcycle except Tierra del Fuego and Missiones.  

This is a stunning country and you are here for a reason.  Be an active, good citizen of the country in which you live.  You might find the negatives fading a bit and you'll be suprised at what great people and experiences you'll discover.  There are much worse places in the world to spend your time.  

Just my .02

Jeff


#247477 Immigration For Dummies

Posted khairyexpat on 19 March 2014 - 02:05 PM

................................................................... AT  A  GLANCE
...................................................... ...........   ......... Worth A 1000 Words

..............................................................2  PROCESSES (NON MERCOSUR)
................. ____________________________________|____________________________________
................. |................................................................................................................................................|
...... IMMIGRATION ............................................................................................................. CITIZENSHIP
..................|................................................................................................................................................|
Direccion Nacional de Migraciones.......................................................................................Poder Judicial de la Nacion
..................|.................................................................................................................................. "Federal Court"
..._____.__|____________________________________________________________ .......................|
..|......................|.................|................|....................|..................|...............|.............|..........|.......................|
Pensioner....Rentista......Work......Student........Business........Family.....Artist......Sport....etc .. ...........--...|
..|___________|_____ ___|________|__________|_________|________|______|_____|.......................|
.................|.................................................................................................................................................|
1 week "turno" wait  +  2 hours (at Retiro Immigration).....................................................................1 to 3 years
.................|.................................................................................................................................................|
PRECARIA (for 3 month)............................................................................................................................|
.................|.................................................................................................................................................|
Temporary DNI (1st year)....................................................................................................  ..........Permanent DNI
.................|................................................................................................................................................+
Temporary DNI (2nd year)...................................................................................................................Passport
.................|................................................................................................................................................+
Temporary DNI (3rd year)..............................................................................................................The Right to Vote
.................|.................................................................................................................................................|
Permanent DNI (end of 3rd year )...........................................................................................................--............|
No Passport & No Voting............................................................................................................................|
.................|.................................................................................................................................................|
Could be lost OR revoked........................................................................................................NEVER lost OR revoked




...................................... ALL DOCUMENTS MUST BE OF ONE OF THE FOLLOWING  5  TYPES
..............................................................(TRANSLATED IF NOT IN  SPANISH)
............ .............._______________________________|______________________________
..........................|..........................................................................................................................|
....................LOCAL ........................................................................................................FOREIGN
........._________|_________....................................._________________________________|________________
.........|....................................|...................................|.........................................|..........................................................|
..EXEMPT ............. LEGALIZED ............EXEMPT.................. LEGALIZED .................. .............. APOSTILLED
.........|....................................|...................................|.........................................|..........................................................|
...Argentine....................-......|.............................Passport.......................Valid ONLY for.....................................Valid for ALL
..Antecedentes......................|.........................................................the 2 countries in question...........................countries that
.......and......................--........|.............................................................................|.....................................................signed
..Certificado............Argentine Document...........................[Canadian] Embassy in BA Document Legalized..........the Hague
........de........................Legalized By ........................................by Argentine Ministry of External affairs ...............Convention
...Domicilio...............Argentine Ministry................................. This is the hard way if you are in [Canada]
......................................del Interior....................................................................or............................................................
...................................................................................[Canadian] Document, Notarized by a [Canadian] public
.................................................................................Notary (RCMP exempt), Certified by [Canadian] Ministry of
........................................................................External Affairs. Then Legalized by Argentinean Consular in [Canada].
................................................................................................ This is the hard way if you are in BA.
............................................................................................................................|
..........................................................................................................[substitute your country]




.................................................THE  7  REQUIRED  DOCUMENTS AT RETIRO
......................... _______________________________|_____________________________
.........................|.........................................................................................................................|
............. 6 STANDARD.......................................................................................... 1 INDIVIDUAL #21
.........................|.........................................................................................................................|
.......1. Current Valid Passport + (its photocopy) +............................................Corresponds to the visa applied for.
.......(a certified photocopy of the passport that has the....................................(Statement of my Pension [for me])
.......last entry stamp if different from the current valid passport)
.......2. Birth Certificate #10
.......3. Criminal Record [Canadian] #8, #9
.......4. Argentine Antecedentes
.......5. Certificado de Domicilio
.......6. Foto Carnet (if you call that a document)



.....................................................HOW MORE SIMPLE CAN IT BE ?
...............................................................(yet it took me over 9 years)
If I had to do it all over again today, knowing this, I could get my Precaria (from A to Z) in less than 3 weeks.


Citizenship and Immigration are 2 completely separate processes (absolutely nothing to do with each other).
Citizenship can be acquired directly without Immigration. (Unique to Argentina.)

There is NO DNI STAND ALONE PROCESS.  One does NOT apply for DNI, .. one applies for Immigration or Citizenship, and a DNI will be issued upon successful completion of either process.



_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
IMMIGRATION: The Netty Gritty:

#1.
Your 1st TASK is to select and identify the ONE category (Residency Visa) you choosing to qualify under.

#2.
List of Residency Visas (categories):
#2.1......Pensionado. Retired Passive Income. Monthly Minimum   UNSPECIFIED.
.............( I took a gamble and passed with ~  $1120 US. ... Does any one know? )
#2.2......Rentista. Monthly Minimum clearly specified (currently = $2200 US) .
#2.2.1...Rentista:  Investment Passive Income ( Rent, ... etc).
#2.2.2...Rentista:  Private Active Income (Sales, Service, ... etc ).
#2.2.3...Rentista:  Employee of Foreign Employer.
.............For Rentista .. MONTHLY INCOME is the criteria (NOT assets)
.............If you have a million Dollar sitting in the Bank, only the interest is your Monthly Income.
.............If the interest is below $2200 US, then you have to convert some of your $1 million to a Trust Fund
.............that will pay you Monthly Income. Or buy a real state property that pays you Monthly Income rent.
#2.3..... Work.  Employee sponsored by an Argentine Company.
             Some employer will sponsor your Work Visa if you accept min. wage. (Teach English, IT, .. etc)
             With Argie partner,  you could legally register an Argentine Business Investment to get  a Work Visa for your self as a
             Manager of that Business.   ( notice you are not applying for or getting a Business Investor Visa).
#2.4......Family.
#2.4.1...Family:  Marriage to Argentine Permanent Resident. (doesn't have to be Argentine Native or Citizen)
#2.4.2...Family:  Parenting an Argentine Child.
#2.4.3...Family:  Being a Child of an Argentine Parent.
#2.5......Business.  Employ and Create Work for Argentines.
#2.6......Student.
.............Certified institution will give you the 1 Individual Document necessary to get a Student Visa.
.............(even studying Spanish will qualify)
#2.7......Medical Purposes.
#2.8......Religious Members of the Church.
#2.9......Artists.
#2.10....Sports.
#2.11....Political Asylum.
#2.12....Refugees.
#2.13....Scientists.
#2.14....Academics.
#2.15....I'm sure there is a lot more, please help identify the ones I missed.

#3.
I booked my 1 week "Turno" online.  Went by myself, ...  all alone.
With the expectation: "Here we are ... My first day in a long drooling bureaucratic 6 months nightmare ".
Aside from answering few questions, paying 600 peso here and 40 peso there,  there is nothing else to do but wait while they do all the work.
He asked 2 questions:
Q: "Why are you here?"...................A: "Pensionado."
Q:  "Why so many passports?"........ A: "Canadian passport expires every 5 years."
In  less than 2 hours I walked away with my PRECARIA.  I was shocked.

#4.
What took time and caused 9 years of confusion?  ..  3 things:
4.1. Getting to understand that a complete Immigration process is mandatory, regardless if I'm living here basically as a tourist (don't work, drive with my own Canadian License, etc ...) It is the written law, (even if currently Argentina is  NOT enforcing its own laws, .. creating the illusion that it is OK to do the Colonia Run).  If they did enforce the law one day, ... it would be GRAVE ( 10 days to leave the country, .. they say  .. ). Understand The Perma-Tourist Saga here.
4.2. Getting to know the process flow, and pin down exactly the requirements (I got my Precaria, without knowing the Monthly Minimum  .. still till this day .. don't know).
4.3. Understanding and gathering Documents. A FOREIGN Document or a LOCAL Non Governmental Document, can NOT be accepted at its face value. Has to be Legalized OR Apostlled. ( AND translated if not in Spanish).

#5.
Canada is NOT a signatory of the Hague, (Apostille is not an option for Canucks)

#6.
RCMP Criminal Record could be obtained in less than 1 week, like this:
Your commesaria here, will take your ink fingerprints.
You FedEx that to one of the hundreds of certified agents in [Canada], they will digitize it and send it to RCMP, Receive the result (3 days regular, 1 day rush), Legalize it and FedEx it back to you here.

#7.
I don't think there is a similar service for digital FBI background check for Yankees.
May be you can have a digital live scan if you're in the US and get your FBI report in 3 days.
But you can not FedEx your commesaria ink fingerprint from BA.
(I could be wrong, .. this is all new .. things are  changing).

#8.
If resided in Argentina the last 5 years, Criminal Record [Canadian], is NOT required.
WASTE OF TIME & MONEY.

#9.
Criminal Records from ALL countries you resided in, in the Last 5 years.  Say you left [Canada] to Argentina 4.5 years ago.  During which you went to Uruguay for 1.5 years.  You will need 3 Criminal Records:  [Canada] + [Uruguay] + Argentina Atecedentes.  

#10.
With Canadian Passport, Birth Certificate is NOT required.
WASTE OF TIME & MONEY.

#11.
Documents DO EXPIRE.  So plan the chronological order in which you gather them.
RCMP expires in 90 days.
Antecedentes Argentina expires in 90 days.
Certificado de Domicilio expires in 30 days.

#12.
A Bill in your name can substitute "Certificado de Domicilio". For example "Luz", "CableVision", "Telefonica" or "Agua". .... "Luz" or "Agua" bill is more stronger than "CableVision".  "Certificado de Domicilio" from Police is the strongest (most official of them all). It is very easy to get. Cost only 10 peso. It will be delivered to your door steps within 48 hours, and will eliminate any doubt.  (Don't understand why would anyone bother to recommend a bill in your  name instead of the Police "Certificado de Domicilio").

#13.
LAST entry Date (not 1st entry Date ) will be the official IMMIGRATION "DNI Fecha Ingreso al  Pais".
Previous entries are considered tourist entries, (even though they count for BOTH  IMMIGRATION & CITIZENSHIP  Residency Requirements).

#14.
Your DNI number remains the same when you transition from temporary to permanent & will  always be marked in red "EXTRANJERO", and the numbers prefixed with "9". (as opposed to Mercosur DNI or Native DNI,  or DNI acquired through Citizenship, these will not be marked as such).

#15.
Bank Account needed?  Never the issue been raised or discussed [in my case].

#16.
Marriage to a PERMANENT RESIDENT (doesn't even have to be an Argentine Native or Citizen) or fathering a child will lead directly to PERMANENT DNI right away (no PRECARIA no temporary DNI's). (Tempting .. No? ... In my desperation I briefly contemplated the idea, but thank God didn't do it).  Extremely complicated nightmare and dangerous tramite. They will find out if you were married before, even if you say you were not. They will ask for divorce papers (and even previous marriage certificate). Even if you ahead, are you gonna fight for 2 years to get divorce after?  No "Prenuptial" in Argentina.  Crazy stupid idea, to put it mildly. Playing with fire, you might get burned.

#17.
Citizenship NEVER could be lost or revoked. It's even difficult (next to impossible), to renounce ones own existing citizenship. It's perfectly normal to acquire dual or multiple citizenships.   Only very few countries prohibit dual citizenship (e.g. Germany, .. etc). Argentine Permanent Residency could be lost if you live somewhere else for more than 2 years. US Permanent Residency could be lost, if you simultaneously have INTENTIONS to live or acquire Residency in another country. Rules differ from one country to another. Residency could be revoked,... for example if indicted in a crime.


#18.
Overstaying tourist visa earns you IRREGULAR STATUS (punishable by deportation). (Unique to Argentina).
For most of the rest of the world, it'd earn you an ILLEGAL STATUS (punishable by jail & black listed  for life never to enter the country again).

#19.
Very Few Lucky Ones will get caught overstaying their tourist visa and will have their passport stamped "Ultima Prórroga" (Last Extension). Also,  Very Few of the above Very Few will get lucky again when trying to re-enter the country with "Ultima Prórroga" stamp in their passport and will be denied entry visa.  Normally they don't enforce the law, and ignore the stamp.  You just pay the the $300 peso overstay fine and they will give a new 90 day stamp..  (it all depends on if immigration officer wake up that morning on the wrong side of bed and decided to enforce the law).  

#20.
Permanent Residency requires (Tener Arraigo) i.e. accumulation of THREE (3) previous ONE year Temporary Residences with a minimum of 6 month stay in the country for each year, with an UNINTERRUPTED renewal "Prórroga" before the end of each of the 3 years.  By letting one Temporary Visa expire,  ALL previous accumulation will be lost.  You'll have to re-start all over again ANEW.
Sixty (60) days before the end of 3rd year, you start the process of changing Residency from Temporary to Permanent, is called "Cambio de Categoria" or "Radicacion".

#21.
The 1 INDIVIDUAL Document is a collection of ALL the components required to support the specific Visa applied for.
For example: The 1 INDIVIDUAL Document of a Student Visa is a LOCAL LEGALIZED Document composed of 3 components:
.....................Certficado de Alumno Regular,
.....................Certificado Analítico con Materias Aprobadas (transcript),
.....................and a "note" from your Master's or Doctoral program.

#22.
For 80%......of straightforward average cases, ... that is all you need to know.
10%............special cases may need extra info, ...  dig deeper in the OP by SteveInBA.
10%............are severely  complicated acute cases ( + those who couldn't be bothered), .. seek a lawyer.

#23.
I have ZERO legal background.
I sifted through selective posts of SteveInBA's OP "Argentine Citizenship for Foreigners", to figure out my case.
Other posts skimmed over my head..... OP is very .. very .. very long.  SEVERAL YEARS worth of heated legal arguments.  
I'm not soliciting anything or giving any advice.  Just offering my time to share my experience.
Hoping it may be useful to someone, the same way SteveInBA's OP was helpful to me.
I get a kick & a sense of satisfaction when I learn how to do something new. (fix my car {when I was younger}, do my taxes, .. ).  
Even if at the end I hand it over to a professional, it's comforting, ..  I'm not totally in the dark.  Says who  .. an old dog can't learn a new trick?

#24.
Your valuable input, ..  (Info / Content / Value Added) ADDITIONS or CORRECTIONS are most welcome.
You will be helping someone who doesn't know and needs to know.

#25.
Important Addresses:
Direccion Nacional de Migraciones (Retiro)..........Av. Antartida Argentina 1355
Argentine Ministry of External Affairs....................Arenales 819
Colegio de Traductores Publico ..........................Av. Corrientes 1834
Registro Nacional de Reincidencia.......................Tucumán 1353
Registro Nacional de las Personas.......................Hipólito Yrigoyen 952
Registro Nacional de las Personas.......................Jujuy 468
Poder Judicial de la Nacion...................................Talcahuano 550

Tramite Migraciones.............................................http://www.migracion...dni_extranjeros
Turno Migraciones................................................http://www.migracion...e/?turno_online
Antecedentes Penales..........................................http://www.jus.gov.ar/rnr-crtificado
Antecedentes Penales..........................................http://www.dnrec.jus.gov.ar
Argentine Citizenship For Foreigners....................http://baexpats.org/...for +foreigners



________________________________________________________________________________________________
CITIZENSHIP:


This post will not be complete until, someone (generous enough with his/her time), who went through the Citizenship path, and is willing to highlight the process flow.



_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
IMMIGRATION: Other Visas ? .. Rejection ? .. Deportation ?:

Same applies to someone who experienced other visas: ...  work, rentista, business, student, marriage, etc ...  
Useful is ONLY the info pertaining to your particular 1 INDIVIDUAL visa document.
(No need to repeat the 6 STANDARD documents).

Also very useful is:  The case where a tramite was rejected at Retiro.
Why was it rejected?
How to deal with that?

Any history of 10 day deportation? Did it ever happen?

What is the Monthly Minimum for Pensionado? Does any one know?



_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
INT'L TAXES For Dummies:

Another for Dummies, but much much more complicated thread to tackle.
For 80% of average straightforward  tax payer who couldn't afford an accountant.
(If you can afford an accountant you probably need one).
.
.

..............................................................CURRENTLY UNDER CONSTRUCTION
.
.
.


#13637 Guide to Housing in BsAs

Posted EliA on 11 September 2008 - 07:31 PM

Hello!I have spent the last three weeks in an equal parts
frustrating/hilarious housing search, so I thought I'd share my
newfound knowledge with people who will have to go through the same.

First,
keep in mind that the temporary apartment business in BsAs is booming. This means there is a lot available, but that the good stuff goes
really, really fast. To wit: I unofficially reserved two places and
when I went to pay mere hours later, they were both already gone.

A few recommendations:

1) If possible, call. I'd say about 1 out of 5 e-mails I sent got a response, but everyone I talked to or left messages with was very good about responding.

2) Be willing to look at apartments that don't have pictures posted online, as long
as it has the requirements you're looking for. Since many people go based on pictures alone, these apartments are less in demand.

3) You will probably find something faster if you are willing to pay commission. I spent 3 weeks looking by myself, but only 2 days looking when I decided I was willing to fork over a little. (Sneaky tip: if the owner him or herself shows you the apartment and not the real estate agent, you can usually go directly through them and avoid the commission altogether. This is pretty backhanded, but Argentina can be a backhanded place.)4) If you speak Spanish, that's really useful. If you don't, try to find a friend who will help you out.

5) It's always easier to look if you're already here, and patience is generally rewarded (I ended up finding a fantastic apartment for an amazing price) so consider renting a temporary place for a few weeks while you look for something more permanent.

6) Remember that what you see on the internet is not necessarily available (even if it says it is), and each company generally has other options that are not posted online.Note: BsAs is a very, very noisy city. If the address is Santa Fé, Avenida de Mayo, 9 de Julio, etc, make sure the apartment itself does not face the street (unless noise doesn't bother you). You may also want to check to see if you are next to or on top of a nightclub or restaurant.

These are the various companies I dealt with and would recommend (not to mention the many, many others I would not).

1) Sergio Giachetti: www.sergiogiachetti.com.ar
This is the company I ultimately rented from; their commission is 15% of the total cost of your rent (i.e. 3 months at $500 = $225); very helpful people and had some great deals.

2) Urban Rent: urbanrent@ciudad.com.ar
They were quite helpful, especially Maria Elena, who tried really hard to give me exactly what I wanted and even tried to negotiate prices down to my level. Her number is 4785 2107 (I don't think she speaks English). Their commission is half a month's rent (pretty standard).

3) ByT: http://www.bytargentina.com
Very big temporary rental company. No comission, administrative fees of $45. I used this company to find the apartment I stayed in for a month while house hunting and was very pleased with the place and the service. Wide range of prices.

4) Next Level: http://www.nextlevel.com.ar
No commission but they do charge administrative fees, usually about $70. They have pretty good prices but aren't always great about getting back to you.

If you are already in BsAs you have the option of just walking around to different agencies. There's an area in Palermo
between Santa Fé and Soler to the N/S and Bulnes to Scalabrini Ortiz (or even as far as Uriarte) to the E/W where you can't throw a rock without hitting one; they will have listings posted outside and you can always go in to see what they don't have posted, too. (Remember that "alquiler" is generally for 2 years, and "alquiler temporario" can be as little as a month or as long as you like.)

You can always use online classifieds as well. These are the best ones I found:
http://www.universia...undamano.com.ar

http://www.inmuebles.clarin.comhttp://buenosaires.olx.com.arFinally, don't discount both craigslist.org and compartodepto.com if you are looking for a shared space. (Note that, for
non-shared apartments, CL tends to be a rip-off because it caters
almost exclusively to unknowing yankees.)As a general pricing guide, I found a one-bedroom apartment with a full kitchen, full dining and living room, a view and a rooftop terraza for $500 a month, all included, in the Balvanera/Congreso area which is nice and central. This is insanely cheap but really good deals DO exist - if you find one, put a deposit on it immediately as it will not last. In general, Recoleta, Barrio Norte, and Palermo are the most expensive areas to live, for good reason: they are lovely. But you should reasonably be able to find a very nice studio (called a monoambiente) or  one-bedroom apartment ranging from $500 - $800, all included (furnished, expenses, cable, internet, and a lot of the time weekly maid service). It is absolutely not necessary to pay more and you can get away with paying a lot less than $800 if you are patient.

I realize this is sort of long but I hope the information is useful! Good luck in your search. ~Elizabeth


#101540 Name registry got stricter....

Posted Celia on 02 March 2011 - 07:59 PM

I had to submit a "pedido de nombre" at the Registro Civil, to obtain permission to name my son after his grandfather (the nickname was on the list but not the long version).
First we were told we could have the name, then they backtracked since the second name wasn't on the list either. I basically had to fill in a form with my begging excuses of why I should be allowed to name my child after beloved ones. With my first son, they accepted a family member's name without the pedido so I guess we were unlucky today or things got tougher.

So we now have to wait 40 days minimum and only the third name appeared on the provisionary birth certificate....

Had been planning a trip to our home countries but of course now we're stuck here.....


#99348 Can Someone Tell Me the Good Stuff?

Posted RichardRPTownley on 18 February 2011 - 11:58 PM

I love it. It is home for me, even though I tried to resist it for so long.

As to the foreign crowd here, think Hemingway's Paris. unfortunately, the talent stays at home in front of their apple macs and tend to shun any form of discomfort Buenos Aires would afford them. Most foreigners are in the push category rather than pull category; they have been sent here by work or ostracised by the motherland for their abnormal behaviour, which becomes ever more apparent here.

There seem to me to be a few distinct types of Ex-pat:

The Rich Young Thing, here to drink and party and wait until there parents come down here to drag them back and/or cut them off.

The Missionary, posted down here by an international company. Loving being paid in Dollars/Euros and living in pesos but quickly gives up trying to kick any sense of order into their native colleagues, "This isn't a franchise goddamit!"

The Castaway
, doesn't really know how he ended up here, nor how he can afford to move on. Someone once told them in a night club in Majorca that Buenos Aires has a beach. They have been bitterly disappointed ever since.

The Diplobrat, either actual diplomat or progeny of, can be charming or hideously spoilt.

The Happy Ending, they fell in love and/or had a kid here. The audience cheered, stood up, walked out. Nobody paused to think that the story continues.

The Ex-pat within an Ex-pat, usually an Argentine who has come back from Miami with dollars in the back pocket, but realises he has no connection to his former countrymen, seeks solace amongst Ex-pats.

The Temporary; students, travellers, life-changers who quickly revert back again. By far the largest group. Here for a year a best. Can be really hard to show interest when meeting them. Sometimes it just too tiring to make friends who are going to be gone in months (always up for a party though).

The city itself, well, right now it is as hot as balls. Get some air conditioning. I didn't. It has a nice balance of scarves and gloves for about 3 weeks in winter and breakfast on the terrace from August until April.
The architecture is really pleasing. from the grand French boulevard edificios, to the low lying, Spanish colonial casas, to the valiant, intricate and pitted jumble of the villas.
Food and drink will initially disappoint. You adapt and learn. Cooking skills definitely improve here. There is no way I would have ever learnt to make my own chutney or sweet chilli sauce before coming here.
Restaurants are affordable and relaxing. You don't get churned out through gritted teeth of reservations and turnovers and last orders. You can turn up at 9pm and leave at midnight. Service is slow and not geared towards tips. It can be incomprehensible at first, and many people never come to understand it, but it is a wonderful way to eat. Not in and out and drinks on the table in under 5 minutes and orders taken in 10, but an event. Enjoyment is at the discernment of the consumer; take your time.

Security
I take no more seriously or lightly than a European capital. All the incidents you hear about on this forum are usual the result of something. A door left unlocked, misplaced trust, appearing just a bit too foreign or affluent in the street. You can still dress well and carry your camera and phone. Just don't leave them on the café table nor get them out on the subway nor at night. Try not to talk too loudly in English at the wrong time (you should be able to determine this). Its peanuts really, just when you do slip up, it will be a knife or a gun at you.

Culturally
it rocks. I don't have the force to write with enough passion about this right now.

The people
. Are wonderful. Hard to approach at first but Spanish classes (even if your Spanish is good) and groups and societies and local bars and cafes, just taking an extra two minutes to talk to your neighbours or portero or store proprietor will introduce you into their customs and attitudes.
I am still continually shocked at times as to the kindness shown by strangers.
It is especially easily if you live in a barrio other than Palermo. I love Palermo, but it is a bit of an island. I have friends who have lived there two years and still cant roll their rrrrrrrr´s (it tolls for thee).

Social attitides towards children is great. Family is important here, if alone you may find yourself incorporated into a family dinner or get together without option ni hesitation.

On the bad side there is no Marmite here.

It is an amazing place to live and I haven't even started talking about outside Capital yet. Argentina outside of Buenos Aires is another entity, different country, amazing and complicated in its own way.

This forum is here to answer questions and gripe. DO NOT take it as your sole source to life here as an Ex-pat.


#141741 New Mugging Scam

Posted glasgowjohn on 09 January 2012 - 02:58 PM

This is another  serious scam . Please BEWARE!
  
  Over the last month I became a victim of a clever 'Eastern European' scam while out shopping. Simply dropping into Carrefour for a bit of shopping has turned out to be quite traumatic. Don't be naive enough to think it couldn't happen to you or your friends.
    
  Here's how the scam works: Two seriously good-looking voluptuous 20-21 year-old girls come over to your car as you are packing your shopping into the boot. They both start cleaning your windscreen. Their large firm young breasts almost falling out of their skimpy T-shirts. It's impossible not to look especially with the really sunny weather we have been having.
  
  When you thank them and offer them a tip, they'll say 'No' and instead ask you for a lift to another store, in my case,  Jumbo in Palermo . You agree and they both get in the backseat. On the way, they start undressing, and both get completely naked. Then, when you pull over to remonstrate, one of them climbs over into the front seat and starts crawling all over your lap, kissing you, touching you intimately, and thrusting herself against you, while the other one steals your wallet!
  
  I had my wallet stolen November 4th, 9th, 10th, twice on the 15th, 17th, 20th, 24th, and 29th. Also December 1st, 4th, twice on the 6th, three times last Saturday and very likely again this coming weekend.
  
  So Be Warned!


#101695 Name registry got stricter....

Posted texxaslonghorn on 03 March 2011 - 02:47 PM

I agree that "Candy Apple Redd," etc., will make for a more difficult life, but WTF? Having a list of approved names seems terrible. Sure, cultures vary. But not being allowed to name your kid what you want (short of profanity) sucks. Especially in the case of your chosen name being a family name.

This is the first I've heard of the name registry.  I'm glad we didn't have any problems.


#279447 Back In New York.......

Posted Davidglen77 on 03 October 2014 - 03:07 PM

.......so yesterday afternoon I arrived back in New York.  I didn't want to say farewell because first of all I don't like goodbye's and secondly I feel a strong connection to Argentina and know that I will be back someday, although probably never permanently.

I've been thoroughly enjoying my first 24 hours back, smiling at everyone and everything, eating all of the foods I have missed SO much, like shrimp in cilantro dressing, egg white omlette with spinach and feta cheese, and I made myself a fruit salad out of rasberries, blueberries, blackberries, papaya, pineapple and pomegranite seeds.

I feel so fortunate to have been in Argentina's womb for the past 7 years....I feel I am a better and a more understanding human being for have lived there. I am warmer with my friends, I will never be as ostentatious and consume as much as I used to. I will never wear a piece of gold jewelry ever again, I am more compassionate towards people who are disadvantaged and not that I wasn't before Argentina but I didn't realize the extent of poverty that a large segment of the world lives with.

I know I did the right thing by coming back for myself and my friends and family.  I will always be part Argentino y siento que mi corazón se tinió de celeste y blanca.

I don't think I will ever stop reading the posts on this board.  I look forward to reading about everyone's adventures in my beautiful Argentina......


#277713 Ajoknoblauch - What Is Your Problem??

Posted Noruega on 24 September 2014 - 01:02 PM

This will probably be deleted right away because it is indeed nothing but a personal attack, but WTF is your problem?? I have had you on "ignore" for months but sometimes I read it anyway, either because of a quote or whatever. In this last thread about being denied entry, your last two comments are:

1. Some stupid comment about soccer (thank God the World Cup so these comments are less frequent)

2. Some stupid comment directed at steveinbsas about Galt's Gulch.

PLEASE STOP!! It is SO annoying and it constantly takes away from the topic. Steve seems like a really nice guy who is always helping out with questions about citizenship and other issues. Stop being a cyber harasser!!

I find it so stupid that an adult man, a published author with a public blog, twitter acount etc. keeps doing this kind of crap.

There, I said it! Felt good!



#159388 Seven years

Posted Gringoboy on 10 May 2012 - 07:01 PM

I've just realised that it's seven years since I took a one way flight from Barcelona to Buenos Aires.
My reason for coming is simple; to find the woman I loved back in 1976.
Well, I found her and we're together and have been since 2005.
We are both very lucky to have each other.
But how things have changed during this time. Not only for us, but everywhere in Buenos Aires.
I remember when I arrived in May 2005; Nestor was president, people were picking up the debris of 2001, many banks were being boycotted by those who had lost everything, but life seemed to be getting better for most.
Admittedly, I was a lovestruck tourist at the time and on a mission so to speak; but I did feel a sense of 'things are getting better'.
Meat was excellent and we went to asados every weekend. Malbec was around $8 and I didn't detect any signs of sinister activities, such as happen now. Of course, my eyes may well have been shut and rose tinted at that time, but now....
I disticntly remember being on holiday in Carilo when Cristina was inaugurated and watching it on the telly in a local bar. There did seem to be a general feeling that with a new and lets face it, the first democratically elected woman as President of this country, that it was a new beginning.
I'm still trying to figure out where she is taking us, but I take strength from being with the woman I love and have always loved.
In that sense, it gets us through.


#108926 New American Breakfast Restaurant!

Posted MizzMarr on 26 April 2011 - 02:11 AM

Hey all, just wanted to pass the word that there is a tasty new American (that's EEUU) breakfast restaurant in Palermo.  They serve up all kinds of goodies like pancakes, french toast, waffles, but also omelettes, home fries, burgers and the like.  What's more they offer real bacon and real maple syrup!   Yum.  

I think it just opened a couple of weeks ago.  It's called Randall's at Malabia 1530, between gorriti and honduras.  It opens early and stays open late.  I can only think of how many times I've wished for a place like this "after hours" on the tail end of a long night out.  :D

ETA that they're open 7 days a week with a set menu.


#66654 PHP / vBulletin programmer wanted

Posted ElQueso on 29 June 2010 - 02:57 PM

I'm looking for a PHP vBulletin programmer who lives or is staying in Buenos Aires at least over the next few months.  Please PM me if you are interested.


#322670 It Happened To Me. Visa Entry Problem.

Posted RodolfoWalsh on 17 January 2016 - 01:42 AM

Well after 6 years in Argentina on tourist visas with 1 expired temporary residency and a citizenship application in the middle I finally ran afoul of DNM.

On the advice of bajo_cero and others on this forum I had decided to forgo visa runs and last year paid the overstay fee after 11 months in the country.

That was December. This past wednesday found me en EZE bright and early, hung over on last night's sleeping pill and a 787's worth of human fumes. Working my way through the immigration line, I end up with the one guy who looks less excited to be there than I do. That was the beginning. As he flipped through my passport a bunch of times, noting the overstays and the tourist stamps, I started to get nervous. He asked me what I was doing in Argentina,I mentioned that I was enrolled in a local university (true) and that I had had problems not entirely of my making in renewing my tourist visa (true) but based on advice given on this forum, I decided not to mention my citizenship intentions. I was very careful not to lie.

Well, after 10 min of that, I get pulled into the back office to talk to the supervisor. The supervisor listens to my story and asks me for my passport and says she's going to try to sort it out. She asks me to take a seat in a small side room which looks like a police interrogation room. Her supervisor comes out and they talk while huddled over a computer.

At this point I start blowing up our good barrister's phone. I think I called his office 3 times and his cell 5+. (Sorry if you were sleeping). I also started calling a few other attorneys just to make sure I got into the country. At this point I wonder out of the room to ask if I can help with the process and the head honcho lady says that there is no more information needed, that I have to go back to the US. I see a document on the computer screen with a big read header and my passport number being typed in.

Right about this point Bajo_cero gets back to me, we exchange messages and he tells me a bunch of things to say and to show them. He says he was going to try and get to a judge but I'll let him add the details of what went on on his end.

Before I can show the Migraciones people anything though, some representatives from the airline told me that some one was going to escort me to the transit area while this was being sorted out.  In the background I hear the word citizenship from the Migraciones people huddled around the computer. The airline reps asked me if anyone was waiting for me and I told them that my girlfriend was and how to find her. When they found her they told her that I was going to have to wait all day and then return to the US that night.

Next up bajo is telling me to calm down because they didn't have jurisdiction over someone applying for citizenship. Bajo said he was sending me something important. After some technical difficulties w/ imessage I got the copy of an order from the court to DNM w/ regards to another case.

Once again I am preempted from showing them anything by the top ranking lady walking in and handing me my passport with the words "Tu equipaje debe estar en la cinta, si no esta, pregunta en la mesa de United".

Thats it, no "Its taken care of", no "sorry about that", no nothing. I wasn't completely sure I wasn't being sent to pick up my luggage to re-check it. But as I pushed my cart towards aduana and nobody came to grab me I realized it was over and that what Bajo had told me must have been true. No tiene competencia sobre un solicitante de ciudadania

Now I don't know if the court contacted them, or if when the went to complete the rejection order something came up in the system. What I do know is that I am incredibly glad that I went down the citizenship road with bajo_cero. Citzenship was the right choice for me, I love Argentina and will be proud to be a member of this country, but, beyond that, I cannot possibly articulate all of my gratitud to bajo cero for his attention on Wednesday and throughout this entire process.

Bajo sometimes gets a rough treatment on this forum, including from me, because of his politics, and while I will never tell anybody off for making fun of his little amigovio relationship with Matias, nobody should doubt his skills as a lawyer. Even before this week I never doubted that I had made the right choice. Even in personal chats his intellect and humor is undeniable and talking shop, his passion for the work always comes through. Bajo, I know you probably don't need any props but I got to give 'em anyway, you certainly deserve them.

In fin, I'm not El Queso and this took way too long to write, but I felt like I needed to share it. I made it 6 years without a problem and it finally happened to me, a good friend of mine (also a member here) was warned that it could happen to him soon as well; so if you've made it this far on a tourist visa, don't get complacent! You could be next. Also if you've been here that long, you must love this place in some way and if you love argentina, just bite the fugazzeta and go native like I.

Rodolfo Walsh

edit: Its 2 am. This post needs a proof read but this is the internet so it'll just have to go out like this.


#181066 Some good news at last

Posted Gringoboy on 28 September 2012 - 03:10 PM

Some may remember me writing about how I got here seven years ago
SEVEN YEARS
Well, she finally said yes and is going to make an honest man of me.
We're getting married next March and are chuffed to bits about it.
It may just be only a choripan event, but what the heck. It will be a very happy day for both of us.

We have also sold our house.....finally. After being on the market for many, many months and then this dollar fiasco not helping matters. But someone finally popped up, got themselves the deal of the century and we sign next week, all things being well.

I have to say that it was tougher selling the house.......................:)


#78805 Where do I find it? Specialty Neighborhoods

Posted Ries on 17 September 2010 - 05:18 PM

(This is meant to be a reference thread- please feel free to add actual information to it. Please refrain from lengthy discourse on how you hate the pizza in Argentina, or how the CIA is controlling your mind- we have plenty of other threads dedicated to both those subjects)



Specialty Neighborhoods-

Like the old Garment District or Diamond District in NYC, similar businesses in Buenos Aires tend to cluster in the same neighorhood.

Here are a few of them.


Fabric- (Telas)
In Once, mostly on Lavalle, between Callao and Peuyrredon. But really, there are
fabric stores for blocks in all directions.
This neighborhood is also the Jewish barrio, and there are kosher restaurants,
stores, and delis scattered about.

Yarn-
Scalabrini Ortiz, starting at the corner of Cordoba, and going south, towards
Corrientes, for about 3 blocks, both sides of the street. Amazing variety, good
prices, everything from polyester to llama.

CD's-
The best selection I have found is right around Callao y Corrientes.
Zivals is the grand dame, with a huge selection of books and CD's, very knowledgeable staff, and the ability to hear anything before you buy it.
http://www.zivals.com/disqueria.html
Notorius, a few blocks down Callao, is also very good. They often have instore shows by bands.
http://www.notorious.com.ar/
There are several other places nearby, with different specialties.

Clothes to embarass your parents-
Its a universal truth that, upon turning 15, a certain percentage of the population seeks to distance themselves as much as possible from their family, and, for the last 35 years, Punk Rock has been one of the main methods of doing this.
Buenos Aires is no exception to this rule. The Bond Street Galleria, on Santa Fe between Rodriguez Pena y Montevideo  is the epicenter of this in BsAs. Need to get pierced, tattooed, or buy Fluorescent Pink hair dye? this is the spot. Lots of goth, heavy metal, punk rock, skater, and other subculture clothes, shoes, and accessories in the galleria proper, and more stores scattered for a few blocks around. Satisfy those suppressed needs for plaid bondage pants and vinyl copies of the Ramones first album.

Electrical gizmos, cords, computer parts,and adapters-
there is an entire galleria on Calle Florida 537-
Galleria Jardin
http://www.galeria-jardin-bsas.com.ar/
and then there is a neighborhood- Parana y Sarmiento.

Musical Instruments-
Callao y Sarmiento, down Sarmiento towards Montevideo. A whole cluster of the best music stores in town, mostly new, some used, with everything.

Hardware- curiously, the same neighborhood that has musical instruments is also the builders hardware neighborhood- with great stores full of doorknobs, towel bars, window latches, handles, hinges, and more. You can often match the hardware in a 100 year old apartment here. Sarmiento, mostly.

Jewelry Stores-
Calle Libertad - start in Corrientes and walk towards Avenida de Mayo - there are three or four blocks with nothing but jewelry stores.

Kitchen and Restaurant supplies-
JuJuy, right around the autopista from San Juan to Juan de Garay.
also, Doña Clara, Av.Corrientes 2561 is highly recommended.

Antique furniture and recycled building parts-
the center of this neighborhood is the Mercado de Pulgas- the permanent flea
market on Dorrego and Niceto Vega. they are building a new building for it one block away, should be open soon.
It has booths with regular sellers of furniture, knickknacks, and some china and glassware.
But the entire neighborhood around it is full of junk stores, antique stores,
and used furniture stores.
Around the corner on Cordoba, there is a cluster of ceramic tile stores, many
with New Old Stock of great old tile, and ceramic trim and fixtures dating back
for years and years. There are also stores nearby selling recycled metal parts,
like railings and windows, recycled flooring, panelling, doors, stained glass,
and just about anything else you could salvage from a building.

Leather clothes-
Calle Murillo, in Villa Crespo, the 600 block near the intersection of
Gurruchaga.

Books-
there isnt really only ONE book neighborhood.

There are a half dozen bookstores on Corrientes, starting around 9 de Julio, and
heading west.
Gandhi is a good one, but there are lots of them.
http://akworld.net/BAweekly/?p=453

El Ateneo bookstore is a must see- an old 30's movie theatre on Santa Fe that is one of the most beautiful bookstores in the world.
http://argentinastra...all-bookstores/

There is also, at the opposite end of the spectrum, a completely dumpy, totally jam packed, messy architecture and design bookstore on Calle Florida- the really knowledgeable older couple who run it know everybody, and everything, about architecture and design in argentina, and much of the world.
CP-67 is the name of the store, at 683 Florida, behind a tacky mini mall of
leather jackets and travel agents, but well worth a visit.
http://www.cp67.com/

There are two book flea markets, that are open most days. One is on Santa Fe, just past Plaza Italia across from La Rural, in the median in the middle of the street. The other is on Rivadavia, at Parque Rivadavia, 4900 Rivadavia.

For english language books, there is Walrus, Estados Unidos 617 in San Telmo.  
http://www.walrus-books.com.ar/

Also recommended by many here is the BookCellar-
http://www.bookcellarbsas.com/

Dental Equipment-
I know, very few travellers or expats will ever NEED dental equipment, but the fact that there is a whole neighborhood dedicated to it is kind of amazing nonetheless.
It is on Marcelo Alvear, right around Ayacucho. If you need a spit sink, or a few miles of floss,now you know where to go.


Ferias-
which translates somewhere between fair and flea market.

Here is a city web page which lists the main ones.
http://www.buenosair...p?menu_id=11229

The antique fair is in San Telmo, Plaza Dorrego, Defensa y Humberto, on Sunday mornings. Its not junk, and its not being given away, but by European or North American standards, the prices are very good.
In the neighborhood nearby are a couple of antique malls, and another dozen or more antique stores, with all kinds of things, at medium to high prices. Not as pricey as the antique stores in Recoleta, but definitely not flea market prices.


The one in front of the Recoleta Cemetery is hippie style arts and crafts.
The one at Parque Centenario, and the one in front of the Chacarita Cemetery, are mixed old and new, great stuff and junk, shoe repair and incense, aunties attic and power ranger pajamas.


Food

There are only a few indoor food markets left in Buenos Aires, with lots of
little stalls each specializing in one type of food.
But they are fun to visit, and often have better food cheaper than the corner
store will.
One is in San Telmo, right off Defensa at Carlos Calvas.
http://www.welcomesa...ide/rmb3jqv6p9/

Another is in Caballito, the Mercado Progersso, on Rivadavia at the Primera
Junta subte stop.
http://www.mercadodelprogreso.com.ar/

Dan Perlman of Casa Saltshaker has a great page of stores where he buys cooking supplies, equipment, and specialty foods.
http://www.saltshake...ires-food-drink


a few I need to do further research on-
I am pretty sure that there is a stretch of either Gaona, or Angel Gallardo, that is tools and contractors supplies.
And that there is a bunch of sewing machine stores around Corrientes and Scalabrini Ortiz, but where, exactly?


#278653 New Law To Close Cuevas Considered

Posted GS_Dirtboy on 29 September 2014 - 01:02 PM

On a related note the government is considering a law against water that flows down-hill.  The government needs water to flow up-hill and the government has accused water that flows down-hill as being selfish and against national interests.


#246773 Last Will And Testament

Posted EdRooney on 14 March 2014 - 10:20 AM

I, Ed "Fiesta Deck" Rooney, being of sound mind and magnificent body, upon my departure from the city of Buenos Aires do hereby bequeath the following items to the below-mentioned forum members:


To CEVICHE, my vintage copy of the Lance Armstrong biography and five dirty syringes.

To PAUPER, 30 metric tonnes of pionono and a gift certificate for a sex-change in the direction of his/her choice.

To ARBOUND, I bequeath $37 million.

To FRENCHIE, I leave my vintage 1971 Captain Kirk moist towellette. That and USD 200K should finally get you your house.

To JOE, my subscription to Gallup Polls and an abacus.

To ARLEAN, a tub of Colgate Gel.

To EJCOT, I leave all of my bittcoins.

To HYBRIDAMBASSADOR and GERMANO, my hotwheels collection and my SUBE card. Sort them out amongst yourselves.

To AJKNOBLAUCH, I bequeath the Republican Party, Peronism and Jack Clark's 1985 NLCS home run.

To GS DIRTBOY, the keys to Moreno's secret Dr Pepper Vault.

To LACOQUETA, I leave the Dewey Decimal System

To STEVEINBSAS, 300 kg of freeze-dried salisbury steak and an Ayn Rand puff up doll.

To ELNICOORIGINAL, my Cámpora leg-warmers and a copy of the Communist Manifesto autographed by Hebe Bonafini.

To MATIASBA, the floorplan for the US Embassy and a stethoscope

To MONTAUKPROJECT, I leave my copy of "The Emperor's Naked Army Marches On" Best. Documentary. Ever.

To VITAL TONY, abslolutely nothing; I wish you were never born.

To CAMBERIU, I hereby bequeath the Cold War and the faith that the free market will somehow work things out.

To DUBLIN2BA, I bequeath the three bottles of vintage Guiness I found under the radiator during our move. You can use them to toast Presidente Macri.

To BAJOCERO, I leave my encyclopaedic knowledge of immigration law and a $50 peso bill for the security guard at migraciones.

To GRINGOBOY, I leave the letter "K"

To NAPOLEON, all of the annoying yellow tourbuses. May your empire commence thus.

To TEX, my gold embossed "I am not a Republican" gun rack.

To RICH ONE, What can one bequeath to him who already has everything?


And to the rest of you outstandingly intelligent and talented folks (you know who you are), I leave the Ciudad Autónoma de Buenos Aires, with all of its riches and madness, and the paranoia that I might return from Salta at any time...


#194085 Six Months After: Ba Vs. Madrid

Posted starlucia on 29 January 2013 - 12:34 PM

Six months ago today, I took my final remis ride to Ezeiza and, after 3 years, left BA for good. I had never moved down there to live like an expat, but to be with my Argentine partner. I genuinely enjoyed living there for the first couple of years -- while I'd always recognized the basic inconveniences, as long as I was earning enough to get by, they were generally outweighed by the things I liked. However, between 2009 and 2012, daily life became progressively more difficult, to the point that I could no longer justify the struggle (living with mediocre coffee and customer service is one thing, but when you have a master's degree and can't afford to buy a can of tuna, it's time to throw in the towel). Since then, I've been living in Madrid, and I must admit that, even in the midst of an economic crisis, life here is quite comfortable. However, neither the city nor the people have the charisma of their Argentinian counterparts. All things being equal, I'd choose BA over Madrid, but unfortunately... they're not. So, since Spain is sometimes mentioned in posts as a possible "alternative destination," I thought I'd make a list of some of the pros and cons of living in Madrid vs. Buenos Aires.

Pros of Madrid

Salary vs cost of living. In Buenos Aires, I made 50-60 pesos per hour as an English teacher, and despite an extremely frugal lifestyle, was barely able to get by. In Madrid, I charge 20-30 euros per hour, earning around 1,200 per month. My expenses are as follows:
-Rent (for a furnished room in a 2-BR apt.) = 275, plus 20-30 for gastos
-Monthly smartphone plan = 14 (600MB of data, 200 free texts, 60 minutes of free national calls and 20 free minutes to other cell phones.)
-Public transportation = 52 for an unlimited monthly pass or 12 for a 10-trip ticket
-Health insurance =  50 per month for the most comprehensive private plan (since I don't pay into the social security system, I can't use the public system.)
-Food and drink = maybe 30-40 per month for groceries, and 10-20 for social drinks (a beer, glass of wine, or coffee all cost around 2 euros, anywhere you go.)
This leaves me enough to travel at least once per month, and still have some money left over.

Security. This was kind of the dealbreaker between me and BA. Constantly being on-guard left me anxious and exhausted, and I feel 100 pounds lighter not having to worry about it anymore. Do I carefully watch my belongings in the Metro, a restaurant, a crowded street, etc? Of course. But I can walk near the curb without worrying about motochorros, feel safe at an ATM or walking home in the dark, and go away for the weekend without worrying about someone trying to break into my apt. It's awesome.  

Ease of travel. Air and bus travel is extremely affordable, and Madrid's location makes it easy to get around. Since August, I've visited Sevilla, Granada, Salamanca, San Sebastian, Lisboa, Rome, and next month I'll visit Pamplona, Venice, Florence, and Milan.  

General first-world efficiency. Consumer products are easy to find and reasonably priced. Huelgas, while annoying, are fairly organized and inconsequential (they must be announced in advance, continue to offer minimum services, etc -- no walking off the job or blocking off entire avenues whenever the hell you want.) If you buy something, you can exchange or return it without hassle. Buses and trains adhere to European safety and environmental standards.  

Food. To be honest, I dislike dining out in Madrid. There's not much variety and the local cuisine is heavy and bland. When it comes to food, madrilenos are just as unadventurous as Argentines, and seem content to eat tortilla, croquetas, and bread with ham every day. However, thanks to the high quality and low cost of almost all supermarket items, you can eat very well by cooking at home. Olive oil, cheese, wild-caught seafood, real yogurt, nuts, coffee, dark chocolate... my diet is SO much more balanced here, thanks to all of those basic food items that I couldn't afford in BA.

What I Miss About Buenos Aires

The people. Generally speaking, I have found Argentines to be friendlier, wittier, more intellectually curious, and more open-minded than Spaniards. They are less entitled, better at managing money, and better at coping with crisis. And, despite the reputation that Argentines have for being rude, I saw MANY more displays of kindness and basic manners in BA than I have in Spain. I've made some lovely friends here, but I personally do prefer the company of Argentines.

The energy. Madrid is an extremely livable city. It's well-preserved, clean, easy to get around in, and although not super-sophisticated, offers all of the amenities of a national capital. HOWEVER... it's just kind of boring. It doesn't have the vibrancy or charm that BA has, and is often depressingly quiet (since the majority of the city closes at lunchtime, on weekends, and by 9pm.)  

Verdulerias. One of my favorite things about Buenos Aires. It was awesome knowing that, regardless of what street you were on, you would be able to find fresh, affordable produce within a 2-block radius. In many parts of Madrid, where verdulerias are non-existent, your only choices are to buy produce at the supermarket (cheapest prices, generally decent-to-bad quality) or one of the "mercados tradicionales," which offer higher quality at much higher prices. And despite being "the farm of Europe," it is becoming damn difficult to find Spanish-grown produce in Spain.

Cafes. Yes, the coffee in BA sucks. The milk in BA sucks. The typical 22-peso cappuccino in BA sucks. BUT the cafes are generally wonderful. The decor, the history, the touch of ceremony (the agua con gas, the cookie) and the fact that you can sit there for hours without feeling pressured to leave. Meanwhile, I have yet to find a truly charming, authentic cafe in Madrid. The Spanish just aren't into coffee, so most "cafes" are actually bars/tabernas with an espresso machine.

Ice cream. The ice cream in Madrid is terrible and nobody seems to care.

Drinking in moderation. I have been amazed by how much alcohol the Spanish consume on a daily basis. They don't binge-drink like Brits or Americans, but it's all day, every day -- beer before lunch, wine with lunch, beer after work, wine with dinner, gin and tonics after dinner. In BA, Sunday lunch might include 1-2 glasses of wine... in Madrid on Sunday, the first beer and tapa happen around 2pm, and they continue pretty steadily until the final gin and tonic around 8 or 9. I miss being allowed to stop after one glass of wine.  



#192861 Why Does Everyone Here Seem To Hate Buenos Aires So Much?

Posted Chicaargentina on 21 January 2013 - 05:09 AM

First i wanna introduce myself, my name is Luciana :) and i live in Buenos Aires (im not originally from here, but from Mar del Plata, and came to live to BA one year ago), im argentinian. I read this forum once in a while to see what foreingers think about this city, to practice my english reading skills, and to read recommendations of good places to go (since i dont know any forum in spanish with such an active community and in where such topics are discussed).

I entered the other day after long time without entering this forum (months, maybe a year) and i notice a HUGE negativity, i didnt remember this forum was like this before? :confused:  Not only most people open topics complaining how BA is bad in just about EVERYTHING (is that even possible, really?), but if someone actually wants to bring some positivity to the forum and post nice things about the city, it get millons of mocks from forumers, or people react angered to a person that actually wanted to say one or two nice things about the city.

I know this city has many bad things, BELIEVE ME, i know :( , it is still hard for me to adapt, and if i had to use a word to define this city, that word would be "chaotic". And its dirty, and everything is a mess, and burocracy sucks,and the long and hot summers, and did i mention is dirty? and traffic omg, and, well, many other things. I get it. This place is no paradise. But does this really have to go as far as to react so angry when someone says one nice thing about this city?? Because this does not seem a discussion forum anymore, more like a BASHING forum, theres no discussion anymore :( .

While I recognize many of the downsides of this city, i find it hilarious that people here complain about how rude people are, seriously?? Argentinians love anything foreingers from northamerica or europe, and they seem to make an effort to be liked by them. If anything, they can be accused of being tilingos (sorry, dont know the translation for that one :lol: ), but not nice? thats like the most surreal thing i ve ever heard. Rude?? I traveled to many places and nothing here can be labeled as rude. Are they stressed out people in this chaotic city? OF COURSE, can people in some places be nasty? obviously. But are, argentinians, or lats say porteños, generally rude? of course not, thats probably one of the most ridiculous thing i ve ever read.

And the pizza-bashing is something i seriously dont understand. I lived in USA and pizza there is actual crap. Lived in Italy and the best pizza wasnt as good as some pizzas in Buenos Aires (one guy said this in other forum and you guys wanted to lynch him!!!).
BA really does have little offer in food and we have A LOT to learn from USA in that respect, but beef, pizza and ice cream....are you joking?? People in the food thread didnt even wanna recognize ice creams here are delicious!!!


If this city is SO horrible and terrible and people are so incredibly mean and rude, SO MUCH that you cant even enjoy the out of the world delicious ice creams that are made in the millon ice cream places all over the city, cause you hate everything else SO MUCH, why dont you live? :confused:


I get it, i get it, you are gonna bash me no end now. Im new to the forum. Im not an expat. Whatever. But i really used to love reading this forum and advices and experiences and now all i read is people HATING. hating so much that they cant even recognize the little good things that are actually good in the city. Like people and ice cream, lol :lol:


#307808 7 Reasons I'm Voting This Sunday For Recalde...

Posted el_expatriado on 02 July 2015 - 11:46 PM

Recalde is the best pick between the major candidates this Sunday. Here's why.

1. He has the best campaign song of all the major candidates.

2. A long history of achievement. He's managed to keep Aerolineas Argentinas flying with record losses since he took over in 2009. The company loses a few million USD per day, but keeps on flying. Most airlines would have closed up shop after 7 years of record losses, but Recalde some how keeps Aerolineas afloat. In fact in another year or two Aerolineas will have lost more money than the entire net worth of LATAM, Latin America's largest airline group.

3. Thinks quickly on his feet. After Aerolineas bought 30 small Embraer 190 planes they discovered that these planes are only really good for short-hop trips (1-2 hour flights). Oops. No matter. When Aerolineas flies one of these planes to Ushuaia they fly a MD right behind it loaded up with all the extra luggage. Now that's quick thinking. Sure, it might cost a bit more, but hey, tranqui.

4. Unparalleled honesty. He turned down a huge bribe. Nuff said. Besides, he gets paid 3 wages for being the President of each of Aerolineas' companies -- Aerolineas, Austral, JetPaq. Seems like bribes would just be extra redundant.

5. Job creator. While every other airline in the region is consolidating and cutting jobs. Aerolineas and Austral work as two separate entities, each with its own management, operations and flight staff, etc. That's a whole lot of jobs he's been able to save. And hey, its more fun to be President of three companies than one (see #4).

6. Go-getter attitude. Took over Aerolineas despite no experience whatsoever in the sector. Who cares that most airlines have CEOs with 20-40 years industry experience. Recalde worked for dad beforehand. Results speak for themselves (see #2).

7. Vedette class. That's right, baby. Vedettes get to fly at the very front of the plane, no extra charge. And if they're busty they might even get to fly the plane.

There you go. Its hard to imagine voting for anyone else when we have such a shining example of the best that Argentina's political class has to offer.