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Changes for "permatourists"


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#161
John.St

John.St

steveinbsas said:

With the new income requirement for the visa rentista and the need to be "in country" for 180 days in a 12 month period to renew, it looks like AFIP may have an new target for taxation...and may be able to collect some of the "losses" in tax revenue if the permatourists actually/eventually leave.
True, but collecting taxes from rentistas and getting the income (foreign currency) from permatourists is even more profitable.

Also, Argentina and many countries have bilateral agreements against double taxation, often stating that taxes are collected in the country where the income is generated (e.g. my home country).

My position is, that if I am no longer welcome in Argentina, I feel confident that I can find another country, which is interested in my money - before moving here I have been living in Chile (and several other countries).

What is the difference in gaining 2.5 billion pesos from 50,000 permatourist or from 160,000 ordinary tourists, staying three weeks and spending 15,500 pesos each?

The 160,000 ain't here and they aren't coming either.
One nation under bigot

#162
Bajo_cero2

Bajo_cero2

Davidglen77 said:

If you are here on an expired tourist visa, or any other visa or do not have documents that state when and how you were admitted to the country, THIS IS NOT ILLEGAL.

There is no such thing as illegal immigrant in Argentina.  You have an irregular immigration status and they can require that you present yourself to immigration to regularize your migratory status.  This is not the restrictive USA where you are technically commiting a crime if you are in the country without formal permission.  

There is no debate about it. You should read the other thread were we were debating about this for the last 5 months like "citizenship for foreigners".

Davidglen77 said:

Deportations here are few and far between and my good friend in migraciones told me in the 14 years he has worked there, he's never heard of a person from the americas either north or south being deported from Argentina.

I disagree partially. You should contact CAREF, this is an ONG that protects south american immigrants from the DGM. CAREF is a satellite NGO from CELS. When I was working at CELS, CAREF director was in the desk nest to mine, so I heard of a lot of cases of deportations of mercosur members (2001).

But they made lobby and that´s why deportation of Mercosur citizens is forbidden since 2005.

They also are who wrote decreto 616-2010 that establishes the deportation procedure. Why they did that? Becouse now there is a legal procedure before a judge instead the old administrative procedure where they were anable to defend their rights.

Regards

#163
steveinbsas

steveinbsas
Argentina is a sovereign nation. The government has the power to determine how foreigners may enter and stay in the country.  Why should foreigners who don't comply with the laws of the country (especially those dealing with immigration) be allowed to live here?
Argentine art for sale: Copy and paste www.argentineart.blogspot.com in your browser.  Be sure to click on "view my complete profile" to see a list of all my blogs dedicated to Argentine art.

And anyone considering "country life" in Argentina is welcome to visit my home at www.goinggaltinargentina.blogspot.com

#164
John.St

John.St

steveinbsas said:

Argentina is a sovereign nation. The government has the power to determine how foreigners may enter and stay in the country.  Why should foreigners who don't comply with the laws of the country (especially those dealing with immigration) be allowed to live here?
Of course Argentina has the right to determine that and of course everybody should comply with all the laws of a country.

Then there is 'Realpolitik' where democracies even co-operate with mean dictators, because it is in their present economic interest.
One nation under bigot

#165
Bajo_cero2

Bajo_cero2

steveinbsas said:

Argentina is a sovereign nation. The government has the power to determine how foreigners may enter and stay in the country.  Why should foreigners who don't comply with the laws of the country (especially those dealing with immigration) be allowed to live here?

Once a foreigner is in Argentinian territory, he has the right to be here and he can enforce it.

Regards




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