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Argentine Citizenship for foreigners: Can it really be this easy?


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#1
steveinbsas

steveinbsas
Today I went to the juzgada federal. After waiting less than a minute I was greeted warmly by a very sweet woman close to my age (I don't think she was new on the job and probably knows what she is talking about). I told her I was there to learn exactly what documents I needed to apply for citizenship. She asked if I was radicated.  I produced my DNI. She looked at it, smiled, and showed me which pages I need to copy.   A younger woman came over and cautioned me about losing my citizenship in the USA. I assured her I knew it was OK and the other two women in the office agreed.

I showed them a photocopy of the translation of my bank trust document. I did not show them the photocopy of the Apostilled English version because my accountant has it (migraciones has the original).  The woman at the desk took the translation along with a six month old letter from my accountant (which certifies the deposits of funds into an Argentine bank) into another office for a few minutes.  (I doubt it was the judges office.)  When she returned she said all I needed is my birth certificate, an updated letter from my accountant and a certificado de domicilo.  I had a photocopy of my birth certificate that had the Apostille  and was translated and legalized by a licensed translator.  It was also certified (as a photocopy from the original) by an escribano. I was told it was acceptable.

I then asked if I needed anything from migraciones.

"You have the DNI.  Just come back with your birth certificate, a new letter from your accountant and the certificado de domicilio (no more than 48 hrs after issuance)."

That's all?" I asked (clearly surprised).

"Yes."

I won't be surprised or upset if the judge asks for something else, such as the English version of the trust agreement or an "original" birth certificate without the Apostille or translation (something I just learned from Bajo_cero2). I already have both of these, anyway.

I'll keep posting about the process as I proceed.:)
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#2
Gilani

Gilani
Steve,

For benefit of other expats, can you tell us

1. Address of the place where you went to

2. If you have completed 2 years of permanent residence or you have less than 2 years of permanent residence.

Thanks

#3
steveinbsas

steveinbsas
1. I don't remember the building number and I'm not even sure of the name of the street. I just looked for the Argentine flag and the words "Juzgada Federal" on the building (which was pointed out by the driver of the remis who knew exactly were it was). I'm afraid this info won't help any other BAexpats. The juzgada I went to is over 600 KM from Capital Federal/Ciudad Buenos Aires, but it's the closest one to where I live.

2. No, I have not completed two years of permanent residence, but I will by the time I am granted citizenship (though I don't think that is a factor).  The woman in the office did not ask for my passport of if I had been in Argentina for two years without interruption, either (even though I have).  I think the latter is a misinterpretation of the phrase "two years continuous residence."  The date of my first arrival in Argentina is recorded in my DNI (as well as the date I was granted temporary residency).

I may now have almost five years of "continuous residency" in Argentina.  One thing is for sure, I haven't lived anywhere else.
Going Galt in an unfortified compound, somewhere on the outskirts of a municipalidad that is not Bahia Blanca. Posted Image

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#4
Bajo_cero2

Bajo_cero2
Steve, I am glad about your experience, you were one of the most incredulous at the beggining when I started to talk about citizenship.

I am going to try to do not high jack your thread.

Captain Cheetah, you don´t choose your judge, it dependes on your address. When you go there they sort you a judge if there are more than one in this area. Capital Federal has 12, San Martin 2, Lomas de Zamora 1, etc. You can find it googling you neighbor and "juez federal civil y comercial".

Regarding the 2 years, many judges accepts to apply with 1 year in the country because the procedure takes 1 year more or less.

Regards

#5
steveinbsas

steveinbsas

Bajo_cero2 said:

Regarding the 2 years, many judges accepts to apply with 1 year in the country because the procedure takes 1 year more or less.

Now you tell us!:D

I can't help but think of all those trips to migraciones and the registro to renew...and renew (not to mention the work involved in getting updated documents regarding source of income and having them Apostilled, sent to Argentina, translated and legalized).:rolleyes:

Unless the judge throws a serious curve, getting citizenship is beginning to look a lot easier than any type of temporary residency.(The "cambio de categoria" from temporary to permanent was the same procedure as the previous renewals, and entailed jumping through the same hoops.)


Bajo_cero2 said:

I am glad about your experience, you were one of the most incredulous at the beginning when I started to talk about citizenship.

You have provided an amazing amount of information here. I hope it will generate clients for you. :)

Actually, during the first month I was in Argentina (May 2006) a real estate agent told me with absolute certainty that I could apply for citizenship after living in Argentina two years if I didn't "get into any trouble." Then I met my first and only Argentine girlfriend who screamed hysterically that would make me illegal (after six months) and insisted that I use her lawyer to apply for temporary residency.

That was when the gates of hell opened and down I went..into the abyss of migraciones and the registro.:eek:
.
Going Galt in an unfortified compound, somewhere on the outskirts of a municipalidad that is not Bahia Blanca. Posted Image

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#6
Bajo_cero2

Bajo_cero2

steveinbsas said:

Now you tell us!:D.

Now I know!

steveinbsas said:

Unless the judge throws a serious curve, getting citizenship is beginning to look a lot easier than any type of temporary residency.(The "cambio de categoria" from temporary to permanent was the same procedure as the previous renewals, and entailed jumping through the same hoops.).

That´s exactly what I was saying for the last months but It was too good for being reallity...:cool:

Regards

#7
JoeBlow

JoeBlow

steveinbsas said:

I showed them a photocopy of the translation of my bank trust document

Hi Steve,

How's it going?

What is a bank trust document? Do you have to have a "lot" of money to have/get one? Do you have to have one to become a citizen?

Thanks!

#8
steveinbsas

steveinbsas

JoeBlow said:

Hi Steve,

How's it going?

What is a bank trust document? Do you have to have a "lot" of money to have/get one? Do you have to have one to become a citizen?

Thanks!

A trust is a legal arrangement in which an individual (the trustor) gives fiduciary control of property to a person or institution (the trustee) for the benefit of beneficiaries. The trustee can be an institution (such as a bank) or any individual selected by the trustor. I am the beneficiary.

You do not have to have any kind of trust to become a citizen. You don't have to have any assets whatsoever, just an "honest means of living."

I used the trust instrument to demonstrate a "stable monthly income" when I was applying for and renewing my temporary residency. The trust is still producing income and the trustee "manages" the accounts and "authorizes"  monthly checks to be deposited into my Charles Schwab account.
Going Galt in an unfortified compound, somewhere on the outskirts of a municipalidad that is not Bahia Blanca. Posted Image

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#9
steveinbsas

steveinbsas
Yesterday I went to the juzgada federal to submit the papers for citizenship. In addition to my DNI (original and photocopy), a very "fresh" certificado de domicilio (less than 48 hours old as specified in the list of requisites), and "proof" of income, I also took all of following:

1. An original state issued certified copy of the birth certificate.

2. An original state issued certified copy of the birth certificate with the seal of the apostille.

3. An original state issued certified copy of the birth certificate with the seal of the apostille, translated and legalized in Argentina.

4. A photocopy of #3 certified by an Argentine notary (escribano) with his half page certificate attached.

5. A photocopy of both sides of all pages of #4...including the half page certificate.

I showed them the first four items.

After examining the first four, and without having even seen it or knowing I had it, they asked for number five.:D

They also filled out the affidavit (petition for citizenship) for me (though I could have done it myself). I was not given any kind of receipt...just a small post-it with a phone number. They told me to call in about six weeks if I haven't heard form them. At that point I will need to have my fingerprints taken by the police. They were very nice to me.:)
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#10
Roxana

Roxana
Congratulations!!!

Among other things, now you have the right to vote in this country!!

( Probably you are not going to be in the padrones for this next election)




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