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Argentine Citizenship for foreigners: Can it really be this easy?


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#11
steveinbsas

steveinbsas
Thanks, but I probably won't have it for about a year...and nothing is absolutely certain.
Going Galt in a fortified compound, somewhere on the outskirts of a municipalidad that is not Bahia Blanca. Posted Image

#12
Gilani

Gilani

Roxana said:

Congratulations!!!

Among other things, now you have the right to vote in this country!!

( Probably you are not going to be in the padrones for this next election)

Roxana,

you clearly don't understand the concept, advantages and importance of dual/multiple citizenships

#13
Roxana

Roxana
@Captain Cheetah, why are you assuming what I did not say?

#14
bigbadwolf

bigbadwolf

Captain Cheetah said:

you clearly don't understand the concept, advantages and importance of dual/multiple citizenships

I don't think the US authorities will let him keep his US citizenship (it would be different were he an Argentinian and applying for US citizenship, in which case I think he could hold both).

#15
steveinbsas

steveinbsas

bigbadwolf said:

I don't think the US authorities will let him keep his US citizenship.

This is simply not the case.  I would have to renounce it to lose it.  Argentina does not require that I do so and I think it's possible that the  US "authorities" will never even know that I have Argentine citizenship (if it is actually granted), but it's OK with  me if they do.
Going Galt in a fortified compound, somewhere on the outskirts of a municipalidad that is not Bahia Blanca. Posted Image

#16
bigbadwolf

bigbadwolf

steveinbsas said:

This is simply not the case. I would have to renounce it to lose it. Argentina does not require that I do so and I think it's possible that the US "authorities" will never even know that I have Argentine citizenship (if it is actually granted), but it's OK with me if they do.

Might be worth checking into. Look at this, for example:

Quote

Also, a person who is automatically granted another citizenship does not risk losing U.S. citizenship. However, a person who acquires a foreign citizenship by applying for it may lose U.S. citizenship. In order to lose U.S. citizenship, the law requires that the person must apply for the foreign citizenship voluntarily, by free choice, and with the intention to give up U.S. citizenship.

Intent can be shown by the person's statements or conduct.

Postscript: I just found this, so I think you should be fine:

Quote

The Department has a uniform administrative standard of evidence based on the premise that U.S. citizens intend to retain United States citizenship when they obtain naturalization in a foreign state, subscribe to a declaration of allegiance to a foreign state, serve in the armed forces of a foreign state not engaged in hostilities with the United States, or accept non-policy level employment with a foreign government.


In light of the administrative premise discussed above, a person who:
  • is naturalized in a foreign country;
  • takes a routine oath of allegiance to a foreign state;
  • serves in the armed forces of a foreign state not engaged in hostilities with the United States, or
  • accepts non-policy level employment with a foreign government,
and in so doing wishes to retain U.S. citizenship need not submit prior to the commission of a potentially expatriating act a statement or evidence of his or her intent to retain U.S. citizenship since such an intent will be presumed.


#17
Napoleon

Napoleon
  • LocationBuenos Aires
It has been posted several times, but SEVERAL TIMES, that you don't have to give up US citizenship.

That being said, every few weeks, feel free to post otherwise, it always spices up a thread.

#18
Gilani

Gilani
I think it makes more sense to Argentine citizenship than US citizenship. if it comes to that.

#19
steveinbsas

steveinbsas
As Bajo_cero2 posted in another thread (enumerating the differences between citizenship and permanent residency):

Bajo_cero2 said:

1) In both cases you have to pay taxes. So, here is no difference.

2) Permanent residency allows deportation, there is no deportation for citizens. If you have a criminal issue, DGM starts the deportation procedure. A criminal issue might be a car crash where somebody die for example, you don´t need to be a criminal.

3) Permanent residency can be taken away, citizenship not.

4) Being a foreingner you are not full protected because: discrimination (there are many jobs where you have to be a citizen for being hired, even it can be claimed at Court, you by pass it being a citizen), reciprocity (for example, the US deports 2000 illegal argentinian sending them to jail before deportation, Argentina might do the same).

5) If there is a war: (think in long terms, the world migh change a lot in the next 40 years)

a) having citizenship you are Argentinian in Argentina. If you have permanent residency you might finish in a concentration camp.

b) Having permanent residency you might lose all your money and assets. Confiscation of the property of enemies is standard all around the world. As I mention, having citizenship, here you are Argentinian.

6) If you are legal, the procedure for citizenship is less bourocratic and for free no lawyer needed (YOU DON´T NEED A LAWYER IF YOU HAVE DNI). The procedure for permanent residency is more bourocratic, you have to pay a fee, the translation, the criminal record, etc.

7) When you sell real state you don´t pay the extra tax if you are a citizen.

However, as I always say, citizenship is an strategy I developed for irregulars who don´t full fit the requirements for residency. In your case, it is more a personal desicion.

Going Galt in a fortified compound, somewhere on the outskirts of a municipalidad that is not Bahia Blanca. Posted Image

#20
2GuysInPM

2GuysInPM
Interesting post from BC2 with that comparison, specially the fear points (5 a and b). :D

I agree one should think long term; So I'll throw a counter to those. If you become a citizen, master nationality rule applies so you will likely loose diplomatic protection here from your country of origin. If, for example, Argentina goes to hell in a hand basket, and let’s say you find yourself in jail, or the government implements strict exit permits, you may end up without any consular assistance from your country of origin or even worse, no way to get out of AR. Simply because you are now an Argentine citizen and that will take precedence in AR over your other nationality. This is probably far-fetched, like the concentration camps idea, but think about those expats now fleeing north Africa.

Anyone thinking about dual citizenship should do a lot of research and be very aware of all the consequences. Possible tax implications are just one issue of many.

IMHO, temporary/permanent residency is not that scary… no matter what anyone else tries to sell you. :rolleyes:




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