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Will the Falklands debacle soon be repeated?


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#1
scarface

scarface
“We can never accept the Argentine government’s challenge to Falklands self-determination

“We will always maintain our commitment to you on any question of sovereignty because your right to self-determination is the cornerstone of our policy”, said British Prime Minister David Cameron in his Christmas message to the Falkland Islands.
http://en.mercopress..._campaign=daily

The Mercosur summit in a two paragraph statement said that “the commitment timely assumed (by member countries) to adopt, in conformity with International Law and the respective legislations of each member country, all measures susceptible of being regulated to impede the access to its ports of vessels flying the illegal flag of the Malvinas Islands”.
The first British reaction came from Foreign Office Minister Jeremy Browne who expressed “concern” about the decision recalling that “Falklands-flagged vessels have been regular visitors to South American ports for 150 years”.
He added “it is unacceptable to engage in an economic blockade of the Falklands. Mercosur should take the responsible decision and not do this. There can be no justification – legal, moral or political – for efforts to intimidate the people of the Falkland Islands”.
http://en.mercopress..._campaign=daily

Does this Mercosur staterment mean Bolivia, among others, will be sending its aircraft carriers to support an Argentine incursion?

#2
Napoleon

Napoleon
  • LocationBuenos Aires
I'm just happy that if I get citizenship, I will be WAY TOO OLD to get called up.

Wars are fought by young people to benefit the wealthy & powerful.

I fall into none of those categories.

#3
TheBlackHand

TheBlackHand
Lol,

If only they would have held the same principals with Northern Ireland it would have saved alot of people much grief. But then again you can't expect integrity from disingenuous self serving two faced bastards.

scarface said:

“We can never accept the Argentine government’s challenge to Falklands self-determination


#4
esllou

esllou
Bolivian aircraft carriers? Alongside the Ugandan icebreakers? Or the Finnish jungle brigade?

#5
glasgowjohn

glasgowjohn
  • LocationVilla del Parque
I hear the Swiss navy will come on a peace mission...
"If you drink, don't drive. Don't even putt."

Dean Martin

#6
dennisr

dennisr

esllou said:

Bolivian aircraft carriers? Alongside the Ugandan icebreakers? Or the Finnish jungle brigade?
And how many functional aircraft carriers do the Brits have? If it was not for some under the table sidewinder missiles provided by you know who, an Argentine flag would be flying over the Malvinas/Falklands today.

http://www.guardian....falklands.world

#7
bigbadwolf

bigbadwolf

dennisr said:

And how many functional aircraft carriers do the Brits have?

They're still putting some money into aircraft carriers if this wiki article is any good:

http://en.wikipedia....ircraft_carrier

But I agree that Britain is a toothless old dog which can now only bark. The days of Palmerston and gunboat diplomacy are long over for Britain.

#8
Carlosgreat

Carlosgreat
Regarding this endless subject:
http://www.telegraph...lands/8576465/A rgentina-grants-ID-card-to-man-born-in-Falkland-Islands.html

#9
Lucas

Lucas
Will the Falklands debacle soon be repeated?

I don't think so, this war will be fought on the diplomatic front and nothing else.

Britain is asleep over Argentina and the Falklands

South America is growing in strength and increasingly united. Britain must wake up to this new reality.

What has changed in recent years is the political climate in Latin America. New governments have appeared across the continent with a progressive and nationalist agenda. They do not always see eye to eye with each other, their views on economic policy may differ, but they are united in believing their continent should organize itself for the benefit of its own peoples without outside interference.

#10
scarface

scarface
Why doesnt GB just give the islands to AR in exchange for a 30 year (or so) lease including the rights to all off shore mining and drilling. If a really large amount of oil is recovered before the lease expires AR can share in a % over a certain amount.




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