Jump to content

Buying A Electric Scooter: A Good Idea?


  • Please log in to reply
33 replies to this topic

#1
mariano-BCN

mariano-BCN
I'm tired of the public transport: colectivos are extremely cheap but also extremely slow, the subte is ok but accustomed to the metro in Barcelona and Amsterdam this sucks, it's filthy, it covers only a small part of the city and the taxis...expensive and outside the centre difficult to get one sometimes.
So I'm thinking about buying a electric scooter: you don't need an A21 (drivers licence for motor-riders), no patente, it costs 1 peso to refill the battery and there's no oil, nearly no maintenance. I would only use it for in the city, I'm not a long distance driver so a car to drive in Argentina is not for me.
But I'm doubting about the fact I'm every year off for 3 or 4 months to travel or to live in Amsterdam and because of safety of driving a scooter in BsArs.
The prices: new from 16 k to 21 k pesos.
Anybody here has one? How are the experiences?

#2
garryl

garryl

mariano-BCN, on 30 August 2014 - 12:43 PM, said:

I'm tired of the public transport: colectivos are extremely cheap but also extremely slow, the subte is ok but accustomed to the metro in Barcelona and Amsterdam this sucks, it's filthy, it covers only a small part of the city and the taxis...expensive and outside the centre difficult to get one sometimes.
So I'm thinking about buying a electric scooter: you don't need an A21 (drivers licence for motor-riders), no patente, it costs 1 peso to refill the battery and there's no oil, nearly no maintenance. I would only use it for in the city, I'm not a long distance driver so a car to drive in Argentina is not for me.
But I'm doubting about the fact I'm every year off for 3 or 4 months to travel or to live in Amsterdam and because of safety of driving a scooter in BsArs.
The prices: new from 16 k to 21 k pesos.
Anybody here has one? How are the experiences?
I have not seen the electric ones here. It's very common in Asia now, cheap and available and reliable.
Be careful though, my handyman lives outside the city, was hit by a car while riding a motorcycle, paralyzed one of his leg. (didn't get much claim from insurance either, not sure where he hot hit)

#3
frenchie

frenchie
They are not very fast and being able to accelerate quickly on a bike can save you.
They are silent so it's rather a disadvantage since you'll get less noticed by cars.
On a scooter, the legs are protected by the bike's body (rather than having the two legs on each side for a real motorcycle), that's rather an advantage.
Where to leave it when you go to Amsterdam for a few months?
Can you afford to break a leg or an arm? (that's why I drive much less bikes now, and I broke plenty of bones already).

#4
Roxana

Roxana
I see vespas around town. Parked at sidewarlks with huge chains.

#5
lacoqueta

lacoqueta
  • LocationBryn Mawr, PA, USA
I have a Vespa that I love and used all the time in the US. Altho I miss it dearly, having taken a course in the US on motorcycle safety and experienced first hand  how defensive you need to be to minimize your driving risks,I decided it was suicidal to drive it here. You have zero protection from others errors other than being super vigilant.  In BA that would be exhausting.
Adilettante

#6
mariano-BCN

mariano-BCN
thanks for the replies! I realise driving a scooter in BsArs is taking a huge risk -that's the biggest minus of a scooter here- but I wonder how people cope with transport here then. I lose so much time on the taxis, colectivos and subte! Public transport is inexpensive, I spend more or less 1000-1200 pesos on taxis in a month and even then it takes a lot of time to move around here.

#7
ajoknoblauch

ajoknoblauch

mariano-BCN, on 30 August 2014 - 01:58 PM, said:

thanks for the replies! I realise driving a scooter in BsArs is taking a huge risk -that's the biggest minus of a scooter here- but I wonder how people cope with transport here then. I lose so much time on the taxis, colectivos and subte! Public transport is inexpensive, I spend more or less 1000-1200 pesos on taxis in a month and even then it takes a lot of time to move around here.

Try a bicycle.
In Dog We Trust. Un Planeta Sin Gatos | Facebook | Twitter

#8
gpop

gpop
I own one for over a year and a half now. Lucky Lion Joy model.
Costs after purchasing are almost non existent. Easy to maintain, easy to park. You don't need to have a license, and they are not "patentado". I do have insurance, but that too is optional.
They get up to around 50 km/h depending on weight. they have a range of around 45Km on one charge. It takes 8 hours to charge from 0, although you can can charge from the remainder in less time. NOTE: the batteries do die down after a time (or more to the point: after many charges). I think it's around 500 charges. It is Chinese made so don't expect BMW performance or quality, but it for the price I've been very happy with it. Great for the city; not so much if you live outside of the city.
A good helmet and U lock are important to have.
It's great. Gets me to where I need to be quick and easy. I charge it when I need it. Make sure you have a place to park and charge it. I keep mine indoors near an outlet.
Nec Spe, Nec Metu

#9
mariano-BCN

mariano-BCN
I had a bicycle but that's much more dangerous here. And this city is not ready fit for it.
And thanks for your comment Gpop, I'm doubting between the models Joy and Cool of Lucky Lion. R u happy with your Joy? Cool is 3K more expensive but the wheels seem better and it has a bit more of volts but does it justify the 3k? On the other hand, you may take the batteries of the Joy out and charge it at home, but that's not possible with the Cool.

#10
jp

jp
Another vote for the humble bicycle. The bike lanes make getting around the city surprising safe, easy and enjoyable.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users