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English-Teaching Jobs


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#1
Orionch

Orionch
Hi all,

I'm planning on travelling back to Argentina with a friend of mine around December or January and we'll be in search of work. The thing is, I have a bachelor's degree and am at an intermediate Spanish-speaking level while my friend only has a high school diploma and speaks no Spanish at all. I was wondering if anyone knows of any English schools that don't require teaching experience or a college degree. I know such opportunities exist throughout Asia but wasn't sure if there was anything like that in Argentina. I'm also open to any other jobs that don't require much experience. Please feel free to let me know if you need more details about myself and my friend to better assist us.

Much thanks,
Orion

#2
Serafina

Serafina
  • LocationPalermo Soho
Since you will be here with no working papers and no teaching experience, the most you can aim are private classes or - even better - conversation classes (where there is no teaching technique knowledge involved).
"Life is what happens while you are busy making asado." - Juan Lénon

#3
Vagrant Violet

Vagrant Violet
  • LocationNúñez, Capital Federal
This post honestly irks me...  Teaching English (and teaching in general) is not something "so simple that even a monkey could do it."  This is what gives *real* English teachers a bad rep and takes away credibility from our profession.

Just because you speak English as a native speaker and can hold a "conversation class" in English does not mean that you have any capacity to teach it (especially if you have no diploma, training, or second language experience).  

Please, first-time poster, look for something else, leave the English teaching to those who know what they are doing.

Now if you'll excuse me, I have to get ready for my ( apparently menial) day at work.
“But I don’t want to go among mad people!" Alice remarked.
"Oh, you can’t help that," said the Cat. "We’re all mad here. I’m mad. You’re mad."
"How do you know I’m mad?" said Alice.
"You must be," said the Cat, "or you wouldn’t have come here.”

-Lewis Carroll, "Alice in Wonderland"

Feel free to check out my blog: www.vagrantviolet.com

#4
sergio

sergio
Conversation classes should have some structure.  The teacher should know grammar and be able to explain mistakes to a student.

#5
steveinbsas

steveinbsas

Orionch, on 17 August 2016 - 09:20 PM, said:

Hi all,

I'm planning on travelling back to Argentina with a friend of mine around December or January and we'll be in search of work. The thing is, I have a bachelor's degree and am at an intermediate Spanish-speaking level while my friend only has a high school diploma and speaks no Spanish at all. I was wondering if anyone knows of any English schools that don't require teaching experience or a college degree. I know such opportunities exist throughout Asia but wasn't sure if there was anything like that in Argentina. I'm also open to any other jobs that don't require much experience. Please feel free to let me know if you need more details about myself and my friend to better assist us.

Much thanks,
Orion

This post looked familiar so I searched "teaching english january" and found this:


jkarsant, on 28 October 2014 - 06:15 PM, said:

My friend and I am moving to Buenos Aires for about 4 months starting in January. We are looking for part-time or possibly full-time jobs to keep us afloat. Is it an easy or hard thing to be employed as an English speaking expat? We have never been to Buenos Aires, let alone South America and some type of direction would be helpful.

Thanks in advance,
John

Further  "assistance" on the subject may be found here: http://baexpats.org/...easy-for-expat/
Argentine art for sale. Click on "view my complete profile" to find links to blogs featuring paintings by individual artists.

#6
Orionch

Orionch
Thanks everyone. It seems that Argentina isn't the best place to start teaching English without any prior experience. Am also open to hearing of any other internship/work opportunities that require little-to-no experience. I myself would have an easier time going about finding work overseas but I'm trying to find something for my friend as well.

Vagrant Violet, on 18 August 2016 - 06:22 AM, said:

This post honestly irks me...  Teaching English (and teaching in general) is not something "so simple that even a monkey could do it."  This is what gives *real* English teachers a bad rep and takes away credibility from our profession.

Just because you speak English as a native speaker and can hold a "conversation class" in English does not mean that you have any capacity to teach it (especially if you have no diploma, training, or second language experience).  

Please, first-time poster, look for something else, leave the English teaching to those who know what they are doing.

Now if you'll excuse me, I have to get ready for my ( apparently menial) day at work.

Um, excuse me, but it's not like what I'm searching for is something all that uncommon. Lots of places throughout Asia hire native English speakers with no teaching experience because they are merely looking for someone who can engage young students in conversation. I know many places in China only require a high school diploma and others require a college degree. I actually do have experience teaching but my friend doesn't, so I was trying to find opportunities for him as well. After all, how do you acquire teaching experience except by teaching...

#7
mjohnstone

mjohnstone
This was posted in Linkedin today.

Posted Image

#8
steveinbsas

steveinbsas

Orionch, on 17 August 2016 - 09:20 PM, said:

Hi all,

I'm planning on travelling back to Argentina with a friend of mine around December or January and we'll be in search of work. The thing is, I have a bachelor's degree and am at an intermediate Spanish-speaking level while my friend only has a high school diploma and speaks no Spanish at all. I was wondering if anyone knows of any English schools that don't require teaching experience or a college degree. I know such opportunities exist throughout Asia but wasn't sure if there was anything like that in Argentina. I'm also open to any other jobs that don't require much experience. Please feel free to let me know if you need more details about myself and my friend to better assist us.

Much thanks,
Orion

After you started this thread in August of 2016  I posted the link to this one:

Moving To B.a. In January. Is Part-Time Work Easy For Expat?

Here is a quote from the thread (which begins with almost the same question you asked in this one):

nlaruccia, on 29 October 2014 - 04:51 AM, said:

Taking the time to use the search function in the forum is your best bet at finding the answers you crave, then start some dialogue.

As Noryega mentioned, organizing a full roster of tennis students will be demanding but also getting private students will be challenging as people usually require references or pick someone by word of mouth. I'm not sure you can go to and expect to be hired by a tennis club, especially if you don't speak Castellano. Maybe I'm wrong. As far as "working in a bar as fun", I highly doubt waiting or bartending work that will require you to work 6 days a week 9 hours per day to survive will be fun. Heed Noruega's advice and come with a contract from a company there, or bring money BTW, working without a visa in any country is illegal.

You may not have read this or you may have read this and ignored the part about working without a visa being illegal in any country.

It's also possible that you sincerely believed that, given the fact that Wall Street English hired you and paid you for three months, that as long as you were taking the actions to get a "work visa" that your employment was legal.

Unfortunately, it wasn't and if you let your tourist visa (or the prorroga) expire, you are now an "illegal alien" (as previously indicated in the thread you started about indemnizacion).

I realize that I am repeating myself here, but I am doing so with the hope it will prevent someone else from ending up in your situation, that is anyone who searches for information about jobs teaching English, especially those who might start working without  a "work visa" (aka temporary residency) or without (at the least) a precaria and a CUIL.

As Dr. Rubilar posted on May 11, 2016 (three months before you started this thread):

Bajo_cero2, on 11 May 2016 - 10:04 PM, said:

They are fines of about 300.000 for working without legal residency.

Argentine art for sale. Click on "view my complete profile" to find links to blogs featuring paintings by individual artists.




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