14O: Large protests and road blocks planned around the country

antipodean

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FYI - Here is a map and list on the planned locations for those moving around tomorrow by road. Pickets expected to start from 09:00. Plan accordingly if you need to be somewhere on time.

The protestors are demanding 1.000.000 quality new jobs and more food for soup kitchens that are overwhelmed.

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Redpossum

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Welcome to Argentina. What else is new.
This, exactly. This country has taught me to be more patient and philosophically accepting. Sometimes all you can do is shrug your shoulders and say, "Welcome to Argentina" or "y esto tambien es Argentina". Then make another cup of coffee and check the sports page.

The old British expats in Africa used to say AWA for "Africa Wins Again", and I think it's very similar.

Interestingly enough, it's not the FdT behind this action, it's the "Izquierda", meaning the Socialists and their ilk, who have actually been opponents of the Peronists for at least the last 70 years.

The first paragraph of this story identifies them, and the third paragraph is also interesting, saying roughly-

Anibal Fernández has already made a gesture in that sense, differentiating himself from the policy that his predecessor, Sabina Frederic, maintained. On September 24, the Federal Police prevented an attempt by former railway workers to block the Roca train line, at the Kosteki and Santillán station, in Avellaneda. These protests over the reinstatement of those laid off had been frequent in the previous months, without the security forces intervening to evict them.

Which is interesting, and shows how one person has many sides. On the one hand, there is his thuggish behaviour toward "Nik" which we were just discussing, and on the other hand his pugnacious nature makes him less lenient with such disruptions by protestors.
 

Alpinista

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This, exactly. This country has taught me to be more patient and philosophically accepting. Sometimes all you can do is shrug your shoulders and say, "Welcome to Argentina" or "y esto tambien es Argentina". Then make another cup of coffee and check the sports page.
This is the expat point of view, for those working from home - as you do, as I do - we are not really affected by this. But if you live in the conurbano, and work in capital, it is quite a different story. I think, not even Mahatma Gandhi in his prime could shrug this off.
 

jblaze5779

Registered
This is the expat point of view, for those working from home - as you do, as I do - we are not really affected by this. But if you live in the conurbano, and work in capital, it is quite a different story. I think, not even Mahatma Gandhi in his prime could shrug this off.

My job is greatly impacted by this shit but I've been through it enough times that I can't get too worked up about it. The worst part is I'm held accountable to gringo bosses that this concept is completely foreign to. What do you mean the roads were closed...?

Based on reactions from last weekend's southwest airlines fiasco most gringos would die if they spent any time here.
 

Redpossum

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My job is greatly impacted by this shit but I've been through it enough times that I can't get too worked up about it. The worst part is I'm held accountable to gringo bosses that this concept is completely foreign to. What do you mean the roads were closed...?

Based on reactions from last weekend's southwest airlines fiasco most gringos would die if they spent any time here.
It does drive you crazy at first. We are used to scheduling our days rather tightly, and expecting things to happen on time. The first six months here are a rude surprise for any yanqui. Either we give up in disgust and go back to the USA, or we learn to adapt.

Argentina taught me patience, and other things. Living here has genuinely made me a better, happier person. God bless Argentina!
 

Quilombo

Registered
This is the expat point of view, for those working from home - as you do, as I do - we are not really affected by this. But if you live in the conurbano, and work in capital, it is quite a different story. I think, not even Mahatma Gandhi in his prime could shrug this off.
This is very true; while I work from home, my husband commutes to GBA 5 days a week. Bless his heart, but he isn't the kind of guy to read the news or follow politics, so I try to remember to message him with a list of cortes when I read about them. I sent him this morning's and he was already trying to come back to CABA when he said he was wondering why traffic was a mess. Needless to say he gave up on that and will visit friends instead.
 

Ronnie Hotdogs

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No such luck for me, there was actually a lot more quilombo because I forgot Argentina were playing at Monumental so no taxis were showing up on Cabify.
Ended up jumping in a normal taxi, he didn’t have enough fuel to get me to ezeiza so he left me down the road on Libertador. Then got another taxi to Ezeiza vía el centro and au25 mayo and barely made the flight.
 
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