Afip Dog Finds $85,000 Hidden In A Car

#1
The AFIP dog squad have been busy today down at Buquebus.

Larishka , specially trained to found hidden cash, found the notes hidden in the air filter of a car about to leave for Colonia.

Bloody expensive ferry trip for the car owner......



http://www.infobae.com/2014/08/12/1587178-un-perro-afip-detecto-us80-mil-escondidos-el-filtro-aire-un-auto-que-iba-uruguay
 
#2
The AFIP dog squad have been busy today down at Buquebus.

Larishka , specially trained to found hidden cash, found the notes hidden in the air filter of a car about to leave for Colonia.

Bloody expensive ferry trip for the car owner......

http://www.infobae.c...que-iba-uruguay
If he had made eight separate trips instead of one, he woulda been OK.
 
#7
Yes I think it is an evil cause to try and block the movement of capital (and or people even) between countries. Passports for instance were not implemented until the beginning of the 20th century. During the height of the British Empire a person could travel most of the World unmolested without much documentation and carrying almost whatever goods he or even she desired to. That changed when Fascism rose in the 1920s...
Some regimes to the right and to the left require or used to require internal passports that subjected people to the same inspections and restrictions when travelling within their own countries. Do you agree with that?
 
#8
There are no limits on how much money you can bring into or out of Argentina, but there are controls in place to ensure (as GS said) that all taxes have been paid and that the money is not illicit. The suspects in question here were welcome to bring their money in, but they broke the law by not declaring it (presumably to avoid paying import customs).

Thus they are not trying to "block the movement of capital" as you allege.

Furthermore, I do not know of any countries that do not have these controls in place, and the 10,000 figure is pretty standard in the US, EU, Canada, Switzerland...
 
#9
the 10K arbitrary figure is indeed pretty standard I've found too, and it makes no sense whatsoever except to funnel money to financiers who can transfer any amount of money under the radar anyway, and to offshore havens, a bizarre creation akin to the black market.
It is evil and stupid and makes no sense. I was never saying it was an Argentina thing, it is a global thing.
 
#10
There are no limits on how much money you can bring into or out of Argentina, but there are controls in place to ensure (as GS said) that all taxes have been paid and that the money is not illicit. The suspects in question here were welcome to bring their money in, but they broke the law by not declaring it (presumably to avoid paying import customs).

Thus they are not trying to "block the movement of capital" as you allege.

Furthermore, I do not know of any countries that do not have these controls in place, and the 10,000 figure is pretty standard in the US, EU, Canada, Switzerland...
Actually you can only take more than 10000 USD out if you declare it and take it out of the country in pesos. i.e. You have 100k USD of taxes paid ganancia from the sale of your automatic choripan dispenser invention you want to take with you to uruguay. When leaving argentina you convert it into 827k ARS and hope that the guy at aduana didn't just call somo motochorros in montevideo to knock you off. Once in uruguay you'll be able to change those 827k ARS into 52000 USD

If that is not blocking the movement of capital I don't know what is/