Are The Price Increases Affecting You?

citygirl

Registered
The money saving threads have got me thinking. As of this morning the cost of gas is going up another 3.8% percent. That puts us on track for a 55% increase in gas/petrol prices this year. Train and plane fare also going up. Tolls have gone up quite a bit. Obviously prices on food are increasing. Just wondering if it is impacting your life and how? What are you doing to save money?

I'll start: With the rise in gas prices (and of course the cost of my insurance and services for my car has gone up), I'll cut down even more on driving and try to do everything in one trip a week if possible.

I will probably switch my pediatrician to someone closer since I've been driving to San Isidro but with time/cost of tolls/gas, etc, it is getting to be too much.

I'm shopping around on health insurance costs since OSDE is just so expensive.

We do lunch for all the workers here. I used to do a lot of dishes with ground beef but given the cost of carne picada, we've moved away from that and do a lot more non meat dishes.

When there is availability and something is on sale, I buy tons and tons of something and put it in the freezer or stock pile it.

I pretty much do all my shopping at Makro and rarely go to Carrefour/Disco/Jumbo.

Dinners out are becoming more of a rarity. It's not that we can't spend the money but I object to spending an average of 400 pesos for the two of us for an average meal.

*I understand that those who live in dollars might not care or say hey, it's still all so cheap at 10 pesos to the dollar. Maybe but since most of us who actually live here (as opposed to passing through) earn/live in pesos, that is irrelevant.
 

Vagrant Violet

Registered
In my household, we don't own a car or drive, but we are still very much feeling the effects of inflation.

Our expensas just went up over 100 pesos this month. Our Fibertel bill went up over 50 pesos this month. Insurance, basic utilties, etc. etc. etc. Every time we receive a new bill, we cringe.

Cutbacks, no matter how small, are essential. My husband has switched to drinking powdered milk instead of fresh milk, for example(it all adds up). We are using some cheaper, generic brand of washing machine detergent instead of fancy-schmancy Skip. I only shop at our local Coto when they have that 15% off oferta with credit cards. Eating out? Pffft! No, it's just not worth it at this point. I don't indulge in the occasional retail therapy treat that I used to allow myself once in a while, spending money on something unnecessary depresses me more than it lifts my spirits at this point.

Despite the fact that I know that we are a lot better off than many people, it's disheartening and depressing that I have to play Hot Potato with my monthly salary (in pesos) each month, and that each month we have to get creative and figure out new ways to save money.

Sigh.
 

Gringoboy

Registered
We used to eat out at least once a month.
Last Friday we went out to eat for the first time since December, really nothing special and including the wine, it was over $500.
Filling the bike up with petrol is a shock nowadays at more than $150 etc etc
The point being that if you earn in pesos, as we do, it's not keeping up with inflation in any shape or form.
 

Chet

Registered
Like it or not economies are global, dollars and euros and ron are all pretty much the same. Prices go up in whatever way you pay them.
 

steveinbsas

Registered
One of the biggest money saving changes I made in the past six months was to stop buying bread....and driving the 3 km (round trip) each day into the local village to buy a fresh loaf. Of course I could walk, but I get enough exercise (including walking) maintaining my property, which I hate to leave. I now drive into the village twice a week to buy fresh veggies and (on occasion) roast beef and/or picada to make chili con carne and pasta sauce.

Once a month I drive to the nearest city to stock up on "dry goods" at Walmart, withdraw pesos transfered via xoom, and. buy a remarkably good (large) ham and cheese pizza preparado fom a panaderia for $36 pesos. I also buy fresh roasted Brazilian coffee directly from a coffee roaster. The price is $160 pesos per kilo and worth every centavo. As often as possible, I take an Argentine friend with me who always chips in for the nafta.

In the past four years I have dined in restaurants twice (pizza both times).

I also shop on ebay and amazon and, once every year or two, have a friend bring one suitcase from the USA with the items I can't or don't like to buy here, especially Diesel brand jeans, Steve Madden casual shoes, Ecco sandals, and McCormik chili powder!!!!!!!.
 

thorsten

Registered
Like it or not economies are global, dollars and euros and ron are all pretty much the same. Prices go up in whatever way you pay them.
The difference is that in most countries the real wages are pretty stable, while in Argentina - if you earn in Pesos - you are facing a higher inflation compared to wage increases basically every year, which leads to lower spending capacity.
 

steveinbsas

Registered
The difference is that in most countries the real wages are pretty stable, while in Argentina - if you earn in Pesos - you are facing a higher inflation compared to wage increases basically every year, which leads to lower spending capacity.
I agree with this, but would use the exp<b></b>ression "buying power" instead of "spending capacity" as Argentines, as a result of wage increases, do have more pesos to spend, but an even greater number of pesos now buy less than they previously did.
 
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