Argentine-Born Us Citizen W/ Us Passport To Travel: 90 Days?

Frinkiac7

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Does anyone have any experience with how Argentine-born U.S. citizens traveling on a U.S. passport are treated? Are you given the standard 90 day tourist visa and subject to the overstay fee if you do? My wife is a naturalized U.S. citizen but has a current Argentine passport from before naturalization and a current (newer) U.S. passport.

I know for instance that they will not charge the reciprocity fee for people traveling on a U.S. passport but whose birthplace in the passport states Argentina. Are there any similar exceptions for the tourist visa or overstay, as they still consider native-born Argentines as Argentine citizens even after U.S. naturalization?

I have read some sites recommend entering Argentina using your Argentine passport, but won't this cause problems if you are a U.S. citizen and you left the U.S. on your U.S. passport?

Would appreciate any insight folks can offer. Thanks.
 

EJLarson

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Does anyone have any experience with how Argentine-born U.S. citizens traveling on a U.S. passport are treated? Are you given the standard 90 day tourist visa and subject to the overstay fee if you do?

I know for instance that they will not charge the reciprocity fee for people traveling on a U.S. passport but whose birthplace in the passport states Argentina. Are there any similar exceptions for the tourist visa or overstay, as they still consider native-born Argentines as Argentine citizens even after U.S. naturalization?

I have read some sites recommend entering Argentina using your Argentine passport, but won't this cause problems if you are a U.S. citizen and you left the U.S. on your U.S. passport?

Would appreciate any insight folks can offer. Thanks.
My wife is an Argentine-born US citizen. We travel to Argentina twice a year, for a month or so each time (so don't know about the 90-day limit). As you note, she didn't have to pay the reciprocity fee (she offered, to avoid potential problems, but the Argentines refused). She travels exclusively on her US passport and has never had any immigration issues. So to your last issue, if she did choose to travel on her Argentine document, it's possible she'd get hassled on the US side. But we've not done it, so we don't know.
 

ben

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Does anyone have any experience with how Argentine-born U.S. citizens traveling on a U.S. passport are treated? Are you given the standard 90 day tourist visa and subject to the overstay fee if you do?

I know for instance that they will not charge the reciprocity fee for people traveling on a U.S. passport but whose birthplace in the passport states Argentina. Are there any similar exceptions for the tourist visa or overstay, as they still consider native-born Argentines as Argentine citizens even after U.S. naturalization?

I have read some sites recommend entering Argentina using your Argentine passport, but won't this cause problems if you are a U.S. citizen and you left the U.S. on your U.S. passport?

Would appreciate any insight folks can offer. Thanks.

AFAIK, if you come on a US passport, and overstay, and they are aware that you are an Argentine citizen, you will not be permitted to leave on your US passport. You will be required to leave on an Argentine passport.


So to your last issue, if she did choose to travel on her Argentine document, it's possible she'd get hassled on the US side.

I'm not sure what this means. A US citizen cannot - cannot - travel on anything other than a US passport when entering/exiting the US.
If you use an Argentine passport, that would be when entering/exiting Argentina, which has nothing to do with 'the US side'.
 

joeschmoe1920

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So to your last issue, if she did choose to travel on her Argentine document, it's possible she'd get hassled on the US side. But we've not done it, so we don't know.
She can't choose to do that because by US law she has to show her US passport when leaving or re-entering the US.
 

RichardP

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My wife is a US citizen and enters Argentina with her Argentine passport. Never had a problem re-entering the US with her US passport on the way home and have been doing it for years.
 

HenryNisental

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I am in that situation and never have a limit imposed on any side, you are citizen of both places and therefore have the right to come, stay and go as you please.
 

Tangerine

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>Does anyone have any experience with how Argentine-born U.S. citizens traveling on a U.S. passport are treated? Are you given the standard 90 day tourist visa and subject to the overstay fee if you do?

What I get is.... Most exit before 180 days or use an Argentine passport and DIN to leave. No reciprocal fee.
Everyone needs a little fresh air and a change before the 180 days. How long can someone go with out good Mexican food? ;-)
 

estebandepraga

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Whar Richard P says is true
I enter on my Argentine passport and enter Europe on my EU passport. No questions asked...ever!
 

EJLarson

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I'm not sure what this means. A US citizen cannot - cannot - travel on anything other than a US passport when entering/exiting the US.
If you use an Argentine passport, that would be when entering/exiting Argentina, which has nothing to do with 'the US side'.
She can't choose to do that because by US law she has to show her US passport when leaving or re-entering the US.
Not surprised that this is the case post-9/11. As I said, she's never tried it, BUT - when she got her citizenship and US passport she specifically asked the question of the State Dept and was told she could travel from/to the US on either passport but it had to be the same one for both exit and entry (logical).

That, however, is information from the last century, and I'll defer to those with more current data.
 

Crema Americana

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Probably easiest to just use the local passport, always. Use the US passport to leave the US, use the Argentine passport to enter Argentina.


Your wife is an Argentine citizen so she can stay as long as she pleases, especially since she has a valid document.
 
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