Argentine visas

Meta998

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HoboZero said:
I wanted to add that I've been here doing the 90 crossing for three years, and was told, angrily I should add, last weekend by the argentine immigrations officer that the laws are changing and a tourist visa is just that and can't be renewed indefinitely. She told me that it was the last time I'd be granted admission.

I've heard that the crackdown was coming. They were going to institute a $135 dollar entrance fee this year, but it never came to fruition. I understand that this is still the plan. It's a matter of when not if.

I'm pursuing a temporary residency now am interested if anyone has gotten one under the "rentista" option. I've got some savings, but can't demonstrate income.


Until the "Official" change is codified, can they really tell you that it's the last time you can do the border crossing to and from Uruguay?

Wonder if anyone else has had the same experience. I'm heading to Uruguay next week - I'm at about day 60 of my 90 days. Curious to see what happens.
 

Liam3494

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Don't panic - The fee that is being talked about is for Americans, not EU passport holders. The authorities have been looking at reciprocation fees against US citizens, as the US charges Argentine citizens for a visa - I would guess that the hassle experienced by Hobo was simply because the tourista visa was on the US passport.
 

tinto

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bradlyhale said:
Very interesting. Well, I'd hope that this isn't the case. I really don't understand where the logic is in imposing limits. Yeah, yeah, the U.S. and other countries do it, but why does a country whose inhabitants are so hellbent on distancing themselves from U.S. policies choose to adopt those policies?

Reciprocity fees are not just immature, but they're ineffective. With regard to the U.S., a very small percentage of people travel internationally. Heck, most U.S. citizens don't even have passports. Obviously, foreigners traveling to countries like Chile or Brazil don't like the fees, and they would probably not support them either. (I sure don't!) However, as I said, this group is a minority. The only people that can change these policies are diplomats and the majority of U.S. citizens, both of which are not affected whatsoever by these reciprocity policies. I'd argue that the majority of the population in the U.S. couldn't careless about what goes on outside of their state borders (states' rights), much less the U.S. border. In most cases in the U.S., majority rules.

So, this all leaves me so confused. Most people who live in Argentina, like myself, have telecommute jobs in their home country. Perhaps I'm just hanging out with people who are too much like me, but this seems to be the case. I only know one person who earns Argentine pesos, and that just serves as supplemental income. Everyone else spends dollars from home. Thus, my point is, why would the government want to kick out people who are spending 100% dollars or even a partial amount?

It seems this country just makes the worst business decisions. With tourism significantly down from last year, restricting "tourists" just seems irrational. Allowing the tourists to stay is perhaps Argentina's smartest "foreign" business decision... and we all know they haven't made very good ones in the past.

While I'm the last one to praise the Argentine government and its policies (past and present), are you really arguing that it's immature to have reciprocity fees? And who is the 135-dollar, one-time fee going to deter from visiting Buenos Aires?

Not only does the U.S. charge for visas, it denies regular people from third-world countries tourist visas and still takes their visa fee. Can you even imagine being denied entry to a country that you simply wanted to visit? It's total discrimination.

I agree that Argentina could benefit from a boost in tourism overall, especially now, so any new restrictions on tourism will hurt the economy even more. However, I maintain that minor fees don't really count as "restrictions."
 

bradlyhale

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It's "immature" because it just reminds me of the schoolboy on the playground that has to get revenge. It gets a country nowhere. I'd like to see countries rise above U.S. policy. I'd like to see Brazil, Chile, Bolivia, Paraguay, etc. lead by their own example, and not the example set by the U.S. ... It's just so... "Nah nah nah boo boo, we're going to get you back!!" ... Ugh.

Putting aside our differences regarding it being immature, I'd like for you to argue how any of it is effective. Surely these fees are put in place in order to persuade the other country to change its policy. I know many U.S. citizens in these parts, and their reaction is, "Oh well. I guess I just won't go." No, we don't moan and groan too much about it. I don't know anyone who has ever contacted the U.S. State Department or their congresspersons out of frustration (nor have I, for that matter). Collectively speaking, we just don't care. In the end, we just go to Buenos Aires, Cancún... or Miami. The people that can change this policy in the U.S., as I already said, aren't affected by it. Diplomats have diplomatic passports, and the vast majority of U.S. citizens don't even carry a passport.

I never said I supported U.S. immigration policy. For the record, I do not. And I do know what it's like to get denied a visa. Three times, in fact, I was denied a visa at the Brazil Consulate of Chicago. This resulted in a Brazilian language institute losing more than $3,000 USD when I studied abroad in my final year at university. However, what was Brazil's loss, was Argentina's gain. Not a smart business decision, if you ask me.
 

steveinbsas

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This thread is closed but has some interesting information.

Tourist visa renewal and renewal and renewal....

Note: The renewal fee at migraciones as well as the fine for the overstay are now $300 pesos.

If you enter the words "tourist visa renewal" in the search box you will find additional threads on the subject.
 

HotYogaTeacher

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Here's my guess: The law was changed to keep workers from other South American nations from coming here to work and staying on tourist visas.

Here's the problem: Those people don't make enough money to do the 90 day crossings (Buquebus is up to almost $200 for a same day round trip on the fast boat). They just hide in plain site, don't get into trouble, work under the table and mind their business. I know entire families that live this way with nary a DNI in the house.

The disorganization of the Argentine government is responsible for the changes in the experience of people like HoboZero (;)~ There is no organization and information is not shared, training is not given. HZ is feeding the Argentine economy, as are many of us, at least in part, with dollars (or pounds or euros) earned at home.

The thing to do if you can't, or don't want to, get your residency, is to do what the workers do, hide in plain site. Stay out of trouble, don't try to act like you are a native, entitled to what they are entitled to. You aren't. You are, stupid as it may seem, an uninvited guest in their country. Most people call uninvited guests intruders. Of course, if someone broke into my house to bring me cake, or presents, I wouldn't throw them out, but then again, I am not the Argentine government. The rules will change back when the fallout from these changes lands in about 2 years. The country will have been emptied out of expats from wealthy nations as news travels around the world that people with apartments and pets and other such encumbrances here were stopped at the border and sent home disrupting their lives.

This will mean a major change in lifestyle for non-resident expats who choose to stay. No more freewheeling travel around the region. Maybe it's time to start researching other places to live......
 
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