Ba Herald To Go Weekly

chris

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Today's Herald reports that as of November 4 the paper will be published only on Fridays. That leaves this huge city with no English language daily. Tokyo has six. It's astonishing that in an age when English is more universally used than ever before Buenos Aires will have no daily English language paper. It's also a sad reflection of the decline of the Anglo-Argentine community that has contributed so much to this nation.
 
A real pity. It was a daily purchase for me despite the gradual decline in quality.
 
Not much of a loss in my opinion. It's been a sorry work for years. Would have been better to have ended on a high note years ago than sully what was a good brand
 
Times are a' changing.I expect that there will be a daily or weekly online edition.
When I came in 1979 under the milicos The Herald with Bob Cox was the champion of free press in Argentina
After it was taken over by Ambito Financiero it was not worth the purchase price in my view.Although I still speed read it online
The British,Irish,Scot and Welsh communities are not in decline.Their children and grandchildren have simply become Argentine "criollos". creoles and don't buy the Herald any more.
Lately most of its readership were tourists and the diplomatic community.
 
" When I came in 1979 under the milicos The Herald with Bob Cox was the champion of free press in Argentina
After it was taken over by Ambito Financiero it was not worth the purchase price in my view.Although I still speed read it online
The British,Irish,Scot and Welsh communities are not in decline.Their children and grandchildren have simply become Argentine "criollos". creoles and don't buy the Herald any more.
Lately most of its readership were tourists and the diplomatic community."


Anglo-Argentines have been around for nearly two hundred years though most probably emigrated in the early twentieth century. Throughout all this time they have continued to speak English and retain a distinctive identity. You are right that they are now merging into the majority and as a result the once ethnic Anglican churches, the schools (Saint Andrews, Saint George's and many others that still exist) have evolved. Nowadays the schools are bilingual as opposed to being British. This of course is inevitable when an ethnic group is greatly outnumbered by people who speak another language. In reality Anglo-Argentines are the last ethnic group in this country to retain any real identity -- all the rest (Italians, Germans, eastern Europeans, Spaniards etc) have merged. Nevertheless it is ironic that now that English is more essential than it has ever been, the current young generation of Anglo-Argentine families are often weak in English, a sign of the gradual extinction of the community's identity.

As for the Herald, it is sad that a city of this size cannot support a single daily English language daily. It really makes the city look provincial.
 
When was the last time you saw anyone in BA buying or carrying any newspaper? What about magazines? Never?Times have changed. These days, people are getting their news online and on tv. I think that this can be applied to most World cities. The newstand price of the NY Times in NYC is US$2.50 weekdays. Ouch
I used to buy the BAH Tuesday-Sunday'There were a lot of interesting articles' Later, it i became a total bore.
Audi and I said '"good bye, BAH""
'.
 
Newspapers all over the world are slowly closing up shop.

See the independent this year too.

I've only ever read the print version of the BAH twice, it has a prestigious history but the past few years its been terrible.
 
Newspapers are read in cafes here. There are invariably several available for customers to read. I don't see people doing a lot of reading at all in Argentina, to be honest. I almost never see it on trains, for example.

The Herald will apparently go to once a week as a print paper and presumably will remain that way on line, possibly with a few updates. I am not sure but there is no indication that there will be a daily online edition.

If the issue were only one of the decline of print newspapers and not just the decline of an English-speaking community, wouldn't there be the emergence of on line English news sources in Argentina? In the end I suppose the Herald's decline is related to several factors: the decline of a community, the decline of print media, soaring inflation in Argentina that has probably made a limited edition print paper unprofitable.
 
Chris, I think it's the Internet.

Now everyone can read The New York Times or the Telegraph or any other newspaper from around the world quite easily so a new paper would have to put a large focus on local news and then they're in competition with la Nacion, Clarín etc

I see lots of people reading on their phones on trains/busses/subways
 
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