Brazil's Fútbol Para Todos

ElQueso

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Seems to me that Brasil would have been better off expanding its police force and actually occupying large parts of dense forest through which things like new rail lines go (so the rails don't get "recycled"), in order to protect infrastructure, build roads and bridges and power stations and other needed infrastructure, work on weeding out corruption and roadblocks to economic expansion and let architecture and "high standing" in the world through the Olympic games and other relatively unimportant things (compared to poverty and lack of means of producing a better future) come later when they could afford it.

It would be like a poor family finally on the economic rise spending all their money on a sleek new luxury car, which they won't have the money to maintain, while their house is falling down around their ears.

My opinion, of course.
 

ajoknoblauch

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Seems to me that Brasil would have been better off expanding its police force and actually occupying large parts of dense forest through which things like new rail lines go (so the rails don't get "recycled"), in order to protect infrastructure, build roads and bridges and power stations and other needed infrastructure, work on weeding out corruption and roadblocks to economic expansion and let architecture and "high standing" in the world through the Olympic games and other relatively unimportant things (compared to poverty and lack of means of producing a better future) come later when they could afford it.

It would be like a poor family finally on the economic rise spending all their money on a sleek new luxury car, which they won't have the money to maintain, while their house is falling down around their ears.

My opinion, of course.

Certainly a reasonable analysis, but could Argentina possibly be a better place without "Fútbol Para Todos?"
 

steveinbsas

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I sincerely want to thank you for posting this. The article was an eye-opening expose of how central planning by collectivists can result in a "crippling bureaucracy, irresponsible allocation of resources and bastions of corruption."

Brazil’s model of "state capitalism" (a contradiction in terms) "gives extraordinary influence to a web of state-controlled companies, banks and pension funds to invest in ill-advised projects. Then other bastions of the vast public bureaucracy cripple projects with audits and lawsuits."

Thank goodness they were using what Sérgio Lazzarini, refers to as "government money" and not funds stolen from the poor.
 

EdRooney

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The article was an eye-opening expose of how central planning by collectivists can result in a "crippling bureaucracy, irresponsible allocation of resources and bastions of corruption."

It was enlightening to read collectivist-in-chief Mitt Romney's comments on the Sochi olympics. Based on his experience frittering away some $600 million in public funds on the 2002 games, Mitt the Collectivist said,


You don't need to spend $50 billion, as Russia has, or as China did, to put on Olympic sport. Olympic sport can be demonstrated at $2 [billion] or $3 billion," Romney said. "And all that extra money could be used to do some very important things, in terms of fighting poverty and fighting disease around the world. That's what we really ought to be using those resources for, as opposed to wasting them, in many cases, to show off a country or, I think more cynically, to show off the politicians in a country."

Freakin' Leninist.
 
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