Can you still afford to live here?

CarverFan

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Anyone know how much have prepagas risen over the last 3 or 4 years?
 

garygrunson

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Since I started my insurance in 2008, at around 380 peso per month, now about 770, so it has gone up 202 %, so this is no big shock.
 

Quinn

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CarverFan said:

Indeed, it is. But a couple can go out here, order a bife de lomo, chorizo, pure de papa and an average bottle of wine for $200AR. In the US, that cost would be the same number sans the 4:1 exchange rate.
 

PhilipDT

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Really? In a mid-upper end restaurant in one of seattles wealthiest suburbs an 8oz filet mignon with garlic mashed potatos runs 18 dollars and actually has flavor. Wine is a wash, higher base prices in bs as but generally lower mark ups. No cubiertos either.

Most dining here is the same or more expensive. No way in hell its 4 times cheaper to eat here.
 

Arizona Guy

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We go to Texas Roadhouse, which is a chain restuarant here un the USA and still has an 8 or 10 oz Top Sirloin Steak( dont recall which size off hand) with 2 sides for under $10.00.

Also, we never pay more than $1.99lb for boneless chicken breasts, They are on sale for this price or less about once a month somewhere and we stock up.

Extra Lean ground beef also is occasionally on sale for a little over $2.00 a pound.

T-bone or New York strip steaks are $4.99 lb on occasion...we buy several when on sale so we never pay the higher prices.
 

va2ba

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Yep I can, but if i had to depend on carnicerias in Palermo and Recoleta I would be broke by now. Its hard to live here than it was before, but we can still afford it.

And no, meat is NOT cheaper in the US than here if you go to the right places to get it.
 

chris

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My local health insurance is about 5 x more expensive than it was in 2003. My building 'expensas' have risen about 5 x in about seven years. I just came back from Pinamar. The one way bus fare (semi cama) was $123. Exactly one year ago (I have the receipt) it was $78,50. Same company, same departure time, same service.

I find costs quite high and don't know if I can continue without making some serious lifestyle changes.
 

dani28

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I have never heard of a filet mignon dinner being $18 in the States, but then again I have only lived in Chicago, NYC and Miami, which may be more expensive than Seattle.
As someone who has lived extensively in both European cities (originally from Madrid, also lived in Barcelona and London) and the aforementioned US cities, I certainly get an overwhelming feeling that my dime goes a lot further in Buenos Aires than it would (or should I say, than it did) if I were living in any of those other places and doing the exact same things as I am doing here, and that my quality of life has risen, and the amount of money that I am spending (the same as I spent in Europe and the States) has remained the same or is even less than before. I am aware of the inflation, but I am talking here and now.

It also depends on what your priorities are, how you live, and how you chose to spend your money, what things you MUST have regardless of over-paying, etc.

For one thing, I did not want to spend a lot on a place right off bat. So instead, I have opted to live in a shared flat in a very nice area of Recoleta where I still enjoy a very spacious bedroom with double closet and balcony, a good amount of amenities included (internet, international cable, local calls-telephone), three times a week maid service, for about a fifth of what a private ¨ex-pat¨ style flat would cost me. However, for many ex-pats, its the end of the world not have to have privacy, a kitchen with all the latest gizmos and gadgets, designer furniture, etc, and therefore, IMO, over-spend on rent which puts a HUGE dent on how you spend on other things and your overall outlook in general!

I do NOT cook and eat out just about every meal (lunch and dinner) at quality restaurants, including 1 or in some cases 2 ¨exceptionally nice¨ (IE: Las Lilas) splurges a week. I always try to scope out good ¨menu¨ type deals which with increased competition, even at dinner time are still available if you look around.

I go out 3-4 times a week to boliches/pubs, I regularly meet friends for coffee/beers during the week without keeping track.

Very importantly: I do NOT spend money on ANYTHING that I deem to be ridiculously overpriced (IE: things that are way out there as opposed to the States or Europe) unless I am in DIRE need of it. I'm not one of those ex-pats that buys the impossible-to-find US or European food item and while ecstatic to find it, grudgingly complains about having paid 8 x what it normally runs them back at home.
I also dont buy the trusty old recognized name brand items when it comes to things like shower gel, toothpaste, etc, I get quality locally made stuff (i dont mean generic, i mean labels that are made in argentina and cost 4 x less than say Colgate, etc)

I feel as though I am living very very well, at the moment it is affordable in my opinion.
 

starlucia

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Quinn said:
Indeed, it is. But a couple can go out here, order a bife de lomo, chorizo, pure de papa and an average bottle of wine for $200AR. In the US, that cost would be the same number sans the 4:1 exchange rate.

The argument that "restaurants are cheaper in BA" seems to apply to beef and beef alone. The minute you want to eat something that's NOT beef or potatoes -- be it seafood, sushi, salads, Thai, Chinese, Middle Eastern, Indian, vegetarian -- you'll pay as much or more than for the same dish in NYC.
 
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