Centuries Old Disagreement Continues

bigbadwolf

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The Falklands are a part of the proud British empire. They can never be allowed to pass into Argentinian hands. The sun never sets on the Union Jack. Margaret Thatcher was completely correct to fight a war for some rocky islands 7,000 miles away from Britain, and inhabited by 1800 shepherds.
 

esllou

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seriously, why do we now have THREE threads on this?? You couldn't have just posted the link into one of the two existing ones?
 

esllou

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Moonwitch said:
Someone is obviously trying to stir up trouble.
maybe. One of the other two threads has the phrase "British banging on war drums" or something - then inside, there is literally ZERO evidence of this. It's mind boggling.
 

Moonwitch

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Yes I know. That thread is also trying to stir up trouble. If anything it is Argentines doing all the war talking...
 

ElQueso

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Moonwitch said:
Yes I know. That thread is also trying to stir up trouble. If anything it is Argentines doing all the war talking...
Actually, it has always and only been the Argentines banging the war drums. The British and the Falkland Islanders are just defending themselves.
 

Moonwitch

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Yes. If the Argentine gov really wanted the Falklands they should have carried on the peaceful talks pre 1982. They would have the islands by now. I think the Argentine gov like the idea of playing the old Malvina card whenever they want some good will.
 

pikto99

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Falkland Islands An Unsettled Issue 25 Years After War
Contending Claims by Argentina, Britain Burden Relations as Anniversary Nears

By Monte Reel
Washington Post Foreign Service
Monday, January 8, 2007
BUENOS AIRES -- As they organize separate 25th anniversary ceremonies to remember their war over the Falkland Islands, Argentine and British officials have found that remembering is the easy part.
Resolving, however, is a much trickier proposition.
The windblown archipelago is once again claiming headlines here, climbing back near the top of Argentina's international agenda a quarter-century after its military surrendered the territory to Britain.
Last week Argentina aimed yet another rhetorical dart at Britain, publicly reasserting its claim to islands it says were stolen by the English in 1833. The British should be getting the message by now: President Nestor Kirchner's government in the past year has issued official complaints concerning rights to the islands at a rate of more than one per month.
Meanwhile, Argentina's legislature has convened a committee dedicated to bolstering its claim over the islands, which sit about 350 miles off its coast and where sheep outnumber people by about 220 to 1. The Argentine government has pushed for, and has received, attention from the United Nations, which drafted a committee resolution last year recommending negotiations. Some political leaders in the region, including Venezuelan President Hugo Chávez, have also publicly rallied around the cause.
"Until the United Kingdom gives the islands back to Argentina, we have a moral obligation as Argentines to work toward their recuperation," said Santiago Tettamanzi, 69, a former merchant marine who plans to participate in a ceremony in April commemorating the war. "We never lost our rights to sovereignty. Getting them back is a national cause."
So all of a sadden Argentinean National Sovereignty means nothing?
 

mini

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pikto99 said:
So all of a sadden Argentinean National Sovereignty means nothing?
The 3 year old article you posted said nothing that undermines the "Argentinean National Sovereignty". What's your point?
 
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