Change we can believe in

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bigbadwolf

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Over the past several months I've been a sceptic with regard to Obama's vague message of "hope" and "change." And now, with his appointments and with his intended policies now becoming clearer, we can see it's the same old story, and just applying some lipstick to the same old pig. In the Financial Times:

The flurry of appointments, which included the former first lady as secretary of state and Robert Gates to stay as Pentagon chief, filled in a picture of an administration that will look strong on experience and will tilt towards the hawkish wing of the Democratic party.
In Washington, the buzzword of "change" has been supplanted by the buzzword, "continuity."
 

criswkh

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The only change we can believe in is if we don't vote for a Democratic or Republican. I still think we should give him a chance. I am very skeptical of some of his choices. I don't plan on rushing back to the US anytime soon. I wonder if he is going to have more press conferences as President-elect than Pres. Bush did in his 8 years.
 

Dudester

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Ah, come on you guys, what do you want? Two 23 year olds straight out of College or something? I think Obama has made excellent choices so far (this is delicate stuff during a VERY delicate time) - a lot of brain power in his choices, no Sarah Palin's In other words. So far so good IMO - I can breath again !!! Just think of it this way, Hillary VS. Condi, get my point? A "can do/will do" vs. a "do nothing" - it's a fact, think about it.....
 

RWS

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That Mr. Obama's nominees can read and write better than some others doesn't mean that they're the most capable -- let alone, any sort of positive "change" (a silly slogan, as change is inherent in living: it would have come no matter who was elected).

At least as disturbing, I think, is the future president's easy adoption of the typical politician's dodges and mincing. His response to a question regarding the nomination of Mrs. Clinton -- how could he entrust foreign affairs to someone whose knowlege and experience in precisely that field he'd so strongly and repeatedly criticized? -- was deflected by a knot of words to the effect that he'd spoken so only during the campaign, because, of course, that was politics.

And is his present behavior statesmanship? A person's character may be one thing that seldom changes.
 

bigbadwolf

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Dudester said:
I think Obama has made excellent choices so far (this is delicate stuff during a VERY delicate time) - a lot of brain power in his choices, no Sarah Palin's In other words. So far so good IMO - I can breath again !!! Just think of it this way, Hillary VS. Condi, get my point? A "can do/will do" vs. a "do nothing" - it's a fact, think about it.....
But, er, what's going to "change" and what exactly can we "hope" for? Obama gave the game away when he appointed that tired old hack, Joe Biden. Virtually every appointment is a person who's had a similar or slightly more junior job in the Clinton administration. In some cases he's keeping on Bush appointees and he may yet appoint Republicans to a senior job or two (gotta do some "reconciliation," exhibit "bipartisanship," and show some "continuity.") Now that Boy Wonder has won supreme office, is anything going to change, or must we be truly audacious to entertain any hope at all?
 

soulskier

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I propose we all take a collective deep breath and wait for the transition and see who things go. Look at it this way, what ever Obama does will be an improvement over what the Bush adminstration has done the last 8 years.
 

bigbadwolf

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soulskier said:
Look at it this way, what ever Obama does will be an improvement over what the Bush adminstration has done the last 8 years.
Ah, but that's an open question. I think what will happen is he will "feel our pain" and "his heart will be in the right place," but what he does will be no different from a Republican. My theory is that voting for a US president doesn't really mean voting for policies since both candidates tend to be indistinguishable on the things that matter; no sirree, voting is about what's in the candidate's heart. Voting for a Democrat means voting for someone who wrings his hands each time he drops some cluster bombs or increases troop presence in Afghanistan. That's how we know he's a good man fundamentally, forced by circumstances to do what a man's gotta do. Obama is going to continue what Bush started (economically and militarily), but he's going to do it with a thoughtful expression on his face and express himself articulately (rather than the trademark Bush leer and the inarticulate fumbling for words). That is how much change we can hope for, all we dare hope for.
 

Moxon

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Not Palin, not Condy, at least better than Bush (a debatable claim) - so this is what it has come to already? It would have been nice if the partisan cheerleaders concerned could have spared the free thinking people of the world the Obamagasm they have been subjected to for the past several months.
 

TheGreatOne

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soulskier said:
I propose we all take a collective deep breath and wait for the transition and see who things go. Look at it this way, what ever Obama does will be an improvement over what the Bush adminstration has done the last 8 years.
I think that Barrack deserves the same respect that the democrats have given President Bush!!! "Selected not elected" ring a bell?
 

Stanexpat

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Why are people surprised that a lot of his choices people are starting to look a lot like what they were complaining about. Politicians after getting elected worry about getting re-elected. Radical changes sound risky and don't go down well with voters. Obama on 95% percent of issues will be indistinguishable from Bush. People need to get real.
 
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