Cheap Tango Classes?

Cath

Registered
Does anyone know where my boyfriend and I can take cheap and fun beginners tango classes in Buenos Aires? I have searched online, but it seems a lot of classes are either private or marketed towards tourists (and pretty pricey). We would like to take classes in a group, but are beginners, and would like to avoid very large classes with students of all levels (as our experience is that we don't learn much in these classes). Does anyone have any recommendations? We live downtown, and would ideally like to take classes somewhere relatively close by, two or three times a week.
 

tangobob

Registered
OK, the first thing is, if you want to take local classes at local rates then you need excellent spanish skills.

If you have good spanish try
Canelo Tango Estudio

4964-0324
15-5424-2847
If not Go to any milonga and pick up The Tango Map Guide (this will also have the best map you will find anywhere) and La Tanguita, a tango magazine. Both are free and are filled with adverts for classes.
Good luck an welcome to the home of Tango.
 

Cath

Registered
Thanks so much for the suggestion! I gave them a call, and they seemed very nice and friendly. We speak Spanish at an intermediate level, but sometimes have trouble understanding the accent here. We'll give it a try and see if we get totally lost.
 

tangobob

Registered
I have some more suggestions:
Most milongas have a class before the main event, although they tend not to be very beginners, it is kept at a simple level to allow for the group size.
Monday try Plaza Bohemia, Maipu 444 good teacher but I cannot remember his name.
Tuesday Try Salon Canning Scalabrini Ortiz 1331. Adreas y Genevia tour europe and speak good english.

I am not sure of the other milongas, but Roberto will definitely get you started. If I remember rightly Valeria speaks english but we last had classes with them in 2004 so I may be wrong.
 

Cath

Registered
Thanks so much for the advice! We're going to give Canelo a try tomorrow and then, if we're really confused, we'll try the other two. Also, tangobob, do the places you mention also offer free tango lessons on weekends, or is that just a during the week thing (our weeks are a little full). And also, pardon my ignorance, but at the one Milonga we visited in BsAs people danced exclusively to recordings of tango from the 1930's (Carols Gardel, etc). I know this is total sacrilege in the world of tango, but I prefer more modern recordings/arrangements or live music. Are there any Milongas at which people dance to live music or later recordings?
Thanks again for the advice!
 

tangobob

Registered
Cath said:
Thanks so much for the advice! We're going to give Canelo a try tomorrow and then, if we're really confused, we'll try the other two. Also, tangobob, do the places you mention also offer free tango lessons on weekends, or is that just a during the week thing (our weeks are a little full). And also, pardon my ignorance, but at the one Milonga we visited in BsAs people danced exclusively to recordings of tango from the 1930's (Carols Gardel, etc). I know this is total sacrilege in the world of tango, but I prefer more modern recordings/arrangements or live music. Are there any Milongas at which people dance to live music or later recordings?
Thanks again for the advice!
Sorry for the delay in answering, your post it got lost amongst the others.
You are right it is Sacriledge, if you are looking for "nueveo" or electronic, then try Villa Malcolm or Milonga X or La Viruta.
I belive Otros Aires and Color Tango have apeared at Viruta, thes are not my sort of places but they all have classes, although they are not free.
 

tangocherie

Registered
You sound like you're young, and probably interested in dancing tango nuevo, as opposed to tango milonguero. In any event, you should know that usually classes are in the one style or the other, and choose accordingly.

Generally speaking, the classes before afternoon milongas are more "milonguero," which emphasizes the embrace, music, improvisation, elegance, connection, and sensuality. The late night milongas, as well as most young teachers, tend to be "nuevo," which emphasizes patterns and figures, use many turns, is not danced in a tight embrace, can be athletic, and uses electronic and alternative music, as well as lots of Pugliese and Piazzola music. Nuevo, as well as stage tango, is more popular than milonguero style in other countries.

Why not go to a couple of milongas and watch the different styles and then choose which you wish to learn?
 

tangobob

Registered
tangocherie said:
You sound like you're young, and probably interested in dancing tango nuevo, as opposed to tango milonguero. In any event, you should know that usually classes are in the one style or the other, and choose accordingly.

Generally speaking, the classes before afternoon milongas are more "milonguero," which emphasizes the embrace, music, improvisation, elegance, connection, and sensuality. The late night milongas, as well as most young teachers, tend to be "nuevo," which emphasizes patterns and figures, use many turns, is not danced in a tight embrace, can be athletic, and uses electronic and alternative music, as well as lots of Pugliese and Piazzola music. Nuevo, as well as stage tango, is more popular than milonguero style in other countries.

Why not go to a couple of milongas and watch the different styles and then choose which you wish to learn?
While I totally agree with what you say Cherie, it is worth pointing out that some of the best miloguero milongas are also late at night. Milongas like Sunderland, Leonesa, Bodeo, Canning to name but a few.
I was going to put my favourite in there (Viejo Correo) but then I realised although it goes on until 3am it often starts early.
 

tangocherie

Registered
Hi Bob, Sure depends what you consider "best."

Milongas come and go here, and also rise and fall in popularity and quality.
While my favorite milonga is Los Consagrados at Region Leonesa on Saturday afternoons (we're always there from 7-10), the late night "Nino Bien" on Thursday in the same salon can be 80% tourists, as the late nights at Canning on Monday and Friday--many local people call those places zoos, and never go. I used to go to Canning on Wednesday afternoons, which is milonguero style, but the quality fell a year or so ago, and I don't go anymore.

Most people consider the milongas in Maipu 444 among the "best," although Ruben and I don't care much for the salon--small and low ceilinged. (This is the location for a late-night gay milonga on Wednesdays--La Marshal.)

Others are faithful to Lo de Celia, especially on Sunday afternoons--lots of old milongueros go there, and they are the best dancers.

Then there is the El Beso crowd. My favorite milonga there is Thursday afternoons--again, lots of milongueros.

The other days of the week in Region Leonesa are earlier milongas which are good.

Gricel on Thursday, Fridays and Mondays is also traditional.
Boedo Tango on the weekend is for groups and couples, and on Wednesdays it's another zoo--last Wednesday there were even 2 tandas of Piazzola while we were there!

I used to go to Viejo Correo years ago but no more--it has sunk almost out of sight.

What's wonderful in Buenos Aires is that there are so many milongas to choose from, and people can find the age group, the tango style, the music, the floor, the codigos where they are most comfortable.
 
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