Churches

davisestudiante

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Hello all,
My name is Davis and I am a student studying abroad in Buenos Aires for 6 months. I know that most portenos son catolicos but are there any protestant churches in the city? I have only been here a week, so I'll admit I haven't spent much time searching, but I would love it if I could find a church to attend. I live in Caballito so obviously close would be better, but I'll take what I can get. Thanks!
 

RWS

Registered
Argentina is historically Roman Catholic, to be sure, but other Christian congregations are becoming more and more numerous. I'd be surprised if any barrio of the Capital Federal were without a few, though I have little acquaintance with Caballito.

When I stay in town, I generally attend San Salvador, on Cramer, near the corner with Sucre, in the barrio of Belgrano (as in most Romanist countries, Protestantism seems to appeal mostly to the middle economic classes, artists, scholars, entrepreneurs); the church is Anglican, but traditionally so, not at all like many of the Episcopal churches in the States. The Anglican cathedral is on 25 de Mayo (not to be confused with the Avenida de Mayo.

Within an easy walk of San Salvador are Lutheran, free Baptist, Presbyterian, and numerous store-front charismatic, pentacostal, and other Protestant churches, too.
 

JSB

Registered
So glad to see this thread as I still entertain hopes of working as church musician in the Southern Cone (despite 100% dismal reports from everybody the profession there). Anybody been to a church where an organist or choir performs composed music of any era..... maybe with the titles listed in a printed bulletin?

Nothing against guitars, drums and PA systems, but it's just not what I do. Thanks!
 

RWS

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Anglican churches in Argentina (or, at the least, the few I've attended) have organ or choral music as the backbone of the service. So do the few Roman churches I've attended, both in the Capital Federal and in the provinces.
 

RWS

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Probably true, judging from church attendance. I'd guess that assimilation in the common (that is, Roman) culture (consider the United States, where hardly anyone of non-Protestant origin remains that after four or five generations), nearly global subsidence of spiritual fervor, and a general malaise are among the causes.
 

tangobob

Registered
I am guessing here, but it may be worth a try:
There is a Church of St George on Scalabrini Ortiz just below Cordoba. As the catholic church does not recognise St George as a Saint, I am making an assumption that it is not a catholic church.
As I said just a Guess but it may be worth your while checking.
 

nikad

Registered
tangobob said:
I am guessing here, but it may be worth a try:
There is a Church of St George on Scalabrini Ortiz just below Cordoba. As the catholic church does not recognise St George as a Saint, I am making an assumption that it is not a catholic church.
As I said just a Guess but it may be worth your while checking.
I believe this is an orthodox church
 

mini

Registered
tangobob said:
I am guessing here, but it may be worth a try:
There is a Church of St George on Scalabrini Ortiz just below Cordoba. As the catholic church does not recognise St George as a Saint, I am making an assumption that it is not a catholic church.
As I said just a Guess but it may be worth your while checking.
Well, it's not that he is not recognized by the Roman Catholic church. He was just demoted... He's considered a "minor saint". But still, he's the patron saint of many Roman Catholic places like Portugal, Catalonia & Aragon, Genoa.

Anyway, I agree with Nikad, I think the church on S.Ortiz is orthodox.
 
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