Coming soon, but need some advice... please!

#1
Hi there,
I understand that all the questions were probably asked and answered before, but I was wondering if I could get all the advice possible before making this grand move?!
My partner and I have just been travelling the world, living here and travelling there and are planning to make the move to Argentina. We immersed ourselves in China for a year and a bit and have been saving hard in the United Kingdom recently, so that we don’t have to work straight away when we make the move to Buenos Aires. Like a great deal of people, we are coming to learn Spanish until we are fluent. Then it’s off to see the rest of South America- motorcycle dairies style!
I have been researching my ass off, trying to find out as much info as possible, but I would like to hear from people that have made this move for real. My questions are:

  1. As being a citizen of a country that doesn’t need a tourist visa, what’s my limitations in regards to overstaying my 3 months? Is it true that we could pop over to Uruguay for the day and then pop back into Argentina? Just like Hong Kong into mainland China.

  2. To improve our Spanish faster, where’s a neighbour-hood that has few expats (no-offence) but is safe and has efficient public transport? Also has decent cheap housing? Lol.

  3. Where’s the “best value for money” place to learn Spanish? Uni, language school or private tutor etc?

  4. How much would someone need to have per month for two people to enjoy a nice but simple life, soaking up the culture of Argentina? We aren’t extravagant people who go out drinking every weekend or big fatties that need 6000 calories a day!

  5. Lastly, is Buenos Aires awesome?
2. China was great and I’m hoping Argentina will even better. Any advice would be greatly appreciated as making this move is tough and can be a quite expensive! So we don’t want to regret it and think...”we should have moved to.......” Thank once again for taking the time to read this and think “not another newbie”.
Ciao,
Thomas Allgood
 

Matty

Active Member
#2
Allgood, I hope you have catching up with the news here as of late. There are some things that you have to know before making this move, not sure why you would want to come to a place that you have to ask...is buenos aires awesome...You should come and live on an extended stay...say 6months before committing to anything..everything here just like anywhere costs money...and lately...those things that we buy at the grocery (aka food) have gone up 20% since the strike. I have receipts since April 25th up until today to show how prices have changed....
a) There are no limitations...jsut go in and exit Uruguay that should give you another 90days...but work (you have to be legal) is entirely another matter.
b) Where you live/sleep and where you speak your spanish are 2 worlds apart. I live in an area with lots of expats...but I speak with the locals more...and the expats when they look lost in the grocery store..I should not be worried about the expats really, just do not talk to them. It is the noise that one should factor in more than who is an expat and not...
c) Again...depending on your level of spanish already and your learning style...you should check out private tutors as well as university. And see where your learning style is best served.
d) Beauty they say is in the eye of the beholder - what might be pink to you is fushia to me...so come and visit...see for yourself and only you can answer that..and then make the decision yourself...
We love to help people out here on this site, we say what is black and what is white. Some people do not like what others say because truth often times hurts...but if you come here you can create your own truth and from that informed personal observation, you can make a well informed decision...visit BsAs...and if I see you around since I am an expat I will not be offended if you do not talk to me...really.
Good luck.
 
#3
"Allgood" said:
Hi there,
I understand that all the questions were probably asked and answered before, but I was wondering if I could get all the advice possible before making this grand move?!
My partner and I have just been travelling the world, living here and travelling there and are planning to make the move to Argentina. We immersed ourselves in China for a year and a bit and have been saving hard in the United Kingdom recently, so that we don’t have to work straight away when we make the move to Buenos Aires. Like a great deal of people, we are coming to learn Spanish until we are fluent. Then it’s off to see the rest of South America- motorcycle dairies style!
I have been researching my ass off, trying to find out as much info as possible, but I would like to hear from people that have made this move for real. My questions are:

  1. As being a citizen of a country that doesn’t need a tourist visa, what’s my limitations in regards to overstaying my 3 months? Is it true that we could pop over to Uruguay for the day and then pop back into Argentina? Just like Hong Kong into mainland China.


  2. To improve our Spanish faster, where’s a neighbour-hood that has few expats (no-offence) but is safe and has efficient public transport? Also has decent cheap housing? Lol.


  3. Where’s the “best value for money” place to learn Spanish? Uni, language school or private tutor etc?


  4. How much would someone need to have per month for two people to enjoy a nice but simple life, soaking up the culture of Argentina? We aren’t extravagant people who go out drinking every weekend or big fatties that need 6000 calories a day!


  5. Lastly, is Buenos Aires awesome?

2. China was great and I’m hoping Argentina will even better. Any advice would be greatly appreciated as making this move is tough and can be a quite expensive! So we don’t want to regret it and think...”we should have moved to.......” Thank once again for taking the time to read this and think “not another newbie”.
Ciao,
Thomas Allgood
Yikes! Two more foreigners who are planning to move to Buenos Aires...without ever having visited!...and without knowing that "working here" is almost impossible, unless $5.00US per hour or working at night appeals to them. You won't actually become "newbies" until after your arrival. Until then you are "wannabies".
I've been an expat in Latin America for seven years and lived here a little over two years without regrets or the desire to leave for more than a couple months a year (which I do), and here are my responses to your questions:
1. As others have noted on this forum, you will be granted a 90 day tourist "visa" (residencia transitoria) upon entry, and you can extend it for 90 days at the office of migraciones without going to Uruguay. After six months here, you can go to Uruguay and start over.
2. Cheap doesn't equal safe when it comes to renting an apartment. Even in Recoleta, which is popular with tourists, you won't feel like you are in an area filled with expats, unless you are very close to the Plaza Francia. Just stay close to linea D of the subway in Palermo or Recoleta and you will be able to take advantage of the "most efficient" public transportation, as well as "soak up the culture" of the city. A "decent" apartment in Recoleta or Palermo is probably "cheap" compared to similar sections of London and generally safer than other areas of Buenos Aires, where being an expat can have some disadvantages. 3. I've been teaching myself castellano, so I am not qualified to answer this one. However, I have learned that "ciao" is spelled "chau" here. (Looks weird, doesn't it?)*
4. Cost of living a simple life (careful shopping/cooking at home) for two adults, including rent for a furnished one bedroom apartment, cellphones, and minimal private health care insurance: $2000-$2500 USD per month. Check out the Cost of Living by Lifestyle topic for more info. The price of groceries could increase significantly while you are here. You'll probably pay more when you renew your short term (six month) lease and possibly be charged an additional agent's commission, even if you paid one upon inception of the agreement.
5. Buenos Aires can be awesome or awful. It all depends on what happens to you while you are here. I suggest you read as many posts as you can find under related topics in this forum (Avoid Being a Victim of Crime, among others). Many individuals have shared their experiences here (good and bad) in the hope that others will benefit from them. Researching your ass off prior to your arrival might actually save yours once you are here.*Learning Spanish in Buenos Aires until you are fluent might not serve you as well as expected as you travel through the rest of South America "motorcycle diaries" style. Castellano in Argentina is a different language, and even without saying a word you may still be identifiable as foreign bikers who have been in Buenos Aires by the mayonesa and mostaza stains on the back of your jackets.
 
#4
"steveinbsas" said:
4. Cost of living a simple life (careful shopping/cooking at home) for two adults, including rent for a furnished one bedroom apartment, cellphones, and minimal private health care insurance: $2000-$2500 USD per month. Check out the Cost of Living by Lifestyle topic for more info. The price of groceries could increase significantly while you are here. You'll probably pay more when you renew your short term (six month) lease and possibly be charged an additional agent's commission, even if you paid one upon inception of the agreement.

(...)
*Learning Spanish in Buenos Aires until you are fluent might not serve you as well as expected as you travel through the rest of South America "motorcycle diaries" style. Castellano in Argentina is a different language, and even without saying a word you may still be identifiable as foreign bikers who have been in Buenos Aires by the mayonesa and mostaza stains on the back of your jackets.
good points here.
I get astonished to see how many travelers go by there without any kind of medical insurance. Better if you have one.
And yes, there's no need to listen someone speaking to know that is not local. This happens here and everywhere, I think. I'm porteña, and was able to recognize argentinians sat down on a bench in Central Park, completely in silence. Body language. The same happens when someone sees foreigners in BA, quite easy to recognize.
a good place to learn spanish would be university http://www.idiomas.filo.uba.ar/extranjeros/espanol/extranjeros.htm
Hope this helps :)