Coming to BsAs with dog..

CarlyB

Registered
My husband and I will be arriving in BsAs in a couple of weeks to study Spanish and take a break from the grind in CA. We're bringing our dog and wondering if anyone can recommend a vet, comment on the ease/difficulty of getting around the city with a dog (will taxis take dogs?), places to buy dog food, etc. Any and all suggestions/recommendations are appreciated!
 

Skipper747

Registered
Carly -
My only concern, for the doggy, is his air travel. You will probably travel with him inside a kennel (in the baggage compartment) which is a dark, extremely cold and noisy place in the airplane in flight. I would suggest you put him in his kennel with his favorite dog toy, and maybe his winter coat if any. If you have to change airplane, he might be cooking in the sun while waiting to be loaded on another plane.
xxx
If you love your doggy, get him to travel with a dedicated cargo airplane, such as FedEx or UPS plane. In these airplanes, live domestic animals are loaded on the forward main cabin pallet, where there is light, air conditioning, decent temperature and less noise. It is likely that one of the pilots will sneak out of the cockpit maybe to smoke a ciggy (illegally) and when he sees your little doggy, will give him a pat on the back, or a cup of milk and a piece of a crew sandwich.
xxx
I am a retired airline pilot. I occasionally flew cargo airplanes, we had animals at times and this is my personal experience. I am an animal lover, and would send my doggy or cat as I suggest. Just get his travel to match your own schedule and put written instructions with the airbill about the dog with a contact phone number for arrival, and if need be join some instructions in English and Spanish for the arrival in Ezeiza. See a vet also for a dog tranquilizer... if you think he might need it.
xxx
In Buenos Aires, go to Carrefour market or Walmart for dogfood - Unlike USA, dogs are welcome in many restaurants, just ask a little dish with food or a small treat to be served for him under the table... I have a husky, he loves beef empañadas and I order one for him sometimes. Go to the parks with your dog, like in Palermo. Many students walk dogs to make a little money, and have half a dozen of them for part of the day to these parks.
xxx
Taxis will take dogs, at worst driver might ask you to leave him sit on the floor. Better than a taxi - look in phone book for a "Remis" (re-meess) nearby, they are unmarked private taxis (request a quote for your trip = often almost equal to regular taxis - and if need be, arrange for a return trip, time and location) - For "I have a doggy", just say "tengo un perro" in Spanish if you want to say it over the phone.
xxx
Enjoy your stay...
 

SaraSara

Registered
Another dog enthusiast here. Skipper's post is right on all counts. Here's my contribution.

-- Air travel is very hard on dogs, regardless of what airlines say. There are temperature restrictions for pet travel: airlines will refuse to carry animals if the temperature is below or above certain limits at any airport the plane touches down on. If your dog is small enough to fit in a carry-on, shop around for an airline that allows dogs in the cabin.
-- Choose non-stop flights if at all possible. My dogs have taken 18-hour flights with no trouble, and without wetting their cages.
-- Put an UNWASHED T shirt in your dog's cage. He'll be reassured by a familiar smell - means you are near.
-- Unless the dog is frantic, avoid tranquilizers. Most vets are against it because dogs have poor "thermostats" - if they are dazed or asleep they won't be be able to pant if they are too hot, or curl-up tight if they are cold.
-- Eukanuba and Royal Canin are two of the best local dog-food brands.
-- I have an excellent vet, but she's out in Martinez, a Northern suburb. Ask other people with dogs about good vets in your neighborhood.
-- Some taxis won't take dogs. It helps to carry a towel for the dog to sit on. Remises are safer, cleaner, and far more accommodating.
-- Most delis and grocery stores don't allow dogs and you'll be told to leave yours outside. DON'T....! Dogs are stolen regularly in BA, and are even "dognapped" for ransom. Mutts, or course, are another matter. (My two are mutts, and therefore ignored.)
-- On the whole, Args. are dog lovers. Many blocks have "block dogs", strays who live in the street and are fed and cared for by the neighbors.

Hope you and your dog have an easy flight. Welcome to Buenos Aires...!

Sara
 

mini

Registered
Skipper747 said:
Carly -
My only concern, for the doggy, is his air travel. You will probably travel with him inside a kennel (in the baggage compartment) which is a dark, extremely cold and noisy place in the airplane in flight. I would suggest you put him in his kennel with his favorite dog toy, and maybe his winter coat if any. If you have to change airplane, he might be cooking in the sun while waiting to be loaded on another plane.
It depends on how big the is, no? My dogs traveled with us in cabin.

CarlyB said:
My husband and I will be arriving in BsAs in a couple of weeks to study Spanish and take a break from the grind in CA. We're bringing our dog and wondering if anyone can recommend a vet, comment on the ease/difficulty of getting around the city with a dog (will taxis take dogs?), places to buy dog food, etc. Any and all suggestions/recommendations are appreciated!
You can take dogs in some taxis. It depends on the driver. I have small dogs & if they travel in their bag/box thing. I always ask if the driver minds. I've never had anyone say they wouldn't take us. I'm sure that if you try to flag a taxi, someone will stop for you & your dog.

You can not take dogs in buses or trains, but you can take them on the ferry to Uruguay. You can not take them to most public places, even the small ones. Unlike Skipper, I've never seen dogs in restaurants or stores unlike in Europe where I took my dogs everywhere. Of course you can sit outside at cafes with them.

People here love their "mascotas" and their is practically a vet on every block in some neighborhoods where you buy dog food. Pedigree (and other brands) are sold supermarkets and grocery stores. I've seen Royal Canine & Ikabana.

Depending on where you live, I can recommend my vet in Palermo. They are great.
 

SaraSara

Registered
Dogs are allowed in the Tigre line but only in the "furgon", the cattle car for people with bicycles or large suitcases. They (THE DOGS, I mean!) are supposed to be muzzled, but no one pays much attention to that.
 

French jurist

Registered
Here is my personal experience bringing a dog here (+ additional details) :

Everything has been well said.
I'll add : if your dog is a short-nosed one (like a bulldog, pug, etc), be aware that they can have respiratory problems in the airplane.
- I brought my dog (a 50 lbs one) from Paris back in 2003 (13 hours non-stop flight) in a kennel. I had bought the kennel one month prior to the departure and during this month, every day, I placed him one hour/day in the kennel like if it was a game (giving him a reward afterwards) so that he could get used to it.
- Sedatives : Some vets will tell you to give some, some other will tell you not to give (so that the dog can react and not hurt himself). I chose not to give the sedative.
- You need too to have some papers ready for the dog (somekind of good health certificate the veterinary authorities from your place will give you).
-My dog reached Buenos Aires in a state of nerves I had never seen before. Even a week after, he still was in some kind of shock. I have heard that this can happen quite often.
 

mini

Registered
SaraSara said:
Dogs are allowed in the Tigre line but only in the "furgon", the cattle car for people with bicycles or large suitcases. They (THE DOGS, I mean!) are supposed to be muzzled, but no one pays much attention to that.
Thanks! I'll have to crochet a muzzle for my dogs. Maybe that can be my project for next weeks Crafty Meeting. Wanna come?

French jurist said:
Here is my personal experience bringing a dog here (+ additional details) :

Everything has been well said.
I'll add : if your dog is a short-nosed one (like a bulldog, pug, etc), be aware that they can have respiratory problems in the airplane.
- I brought my dog (a 50 lbs one) from Paris back in 2003 (13 hours non-stop flight) in a kennel. I had bought the kennel one month prior to the departure and during this month, every day, I placed him one hour/day in the kennel like if it was a game (giving him a reward afterwards) so that he could get used to it.
- Sedatives : Some vets will tell you to give some, some other will tell you not to give (so that the dog can react and not hurt himself). I chose not to give the sedative.
- You need too to have some papers ready for the dog (somekind of good health certificate the veterinary authorities from your place will give you).
-My dog reached Buenos Aires in a state of nerves I had never seen before. Even a week after, he still was in some kind of shock. I have heard that this can happen quite often.
Yes. The papers are whole other thing. They are not difficult to get but your really need to make sure everything is in order.

Sedatives: NO! If they get sick (throw up) and are alone down in the kennel they could choke. Even the sedative can be harmful. My friend lost two of here 4 cats when the vet sedated them.

Your poor little dog! :( We travel a lot & I wouldn't have it any other way. But this is exactly why I choose such small dogs. So they can travel with us in cabin.
 

SaraSara

Registered
My beloved thirteen year-old mutt had a seizure a few hours hours after flying from Washington to BA. She lived for three more years after that, but had seizures every month or so.

My sister lost her dog to seizures after a three-hour flight from Puerto Madryn. He was eleven years old, and in perfect health.

After those two horrible experiences, I won't put a dog in the hold of a plane ever again. That's why I bought a vacation home in Colonia instead of in Bariloche, Salta or Mendoza. The one-hour ferry ride is nothing - my dog just curls up in the back seat of the car and sleeps all the way.
 

French jurist

Registered
SaraSara said:
My beloved thirteen year-old mutt had a seizure a few hours hours after flying from Washington to BA. She lived for three more years after that, but had seizures every month or so.

My sister lost her dog to seizures after a three-hour flight from Puerto Madryn. He was eleven years old, and in perfect health.

After those two horrible experiences, I won't put a dog in the hold of a plane ever again. That's why I bought a vacation home in Colonia instead of in Bariloche, Salta or Mendoza. The one-hour ferry ride is nothing - my dog just curls up in the back seat of the car and sleeps all the way.
I didn't insist too much on my dog's health after the 13 hours flight but in fact he died two months after from a non-related disease (the ugliest cancer : an osteosarcoma located on the spine...).
Nevertheless, until he died, his behaviour changed a lot (was very very nervous) and this was not related to the disease.

It's something to consider depending on how long you want to stay in Argentina (if it's just a few months, I would try to find someone who could take care of the dog instead of flying back and forth).
 

SaraSara

Registered
French jurist said:
I didn't insist too much on my dog's health after the 13 hours flight but in fact he died two months after from a non-related disease (the ugliest cancer : an osteosarcoma located on the spine...).
Nevertheless, until he died, his behaviour changed a lot (was very very nervous) and this was not related to the disease.

It's something to consider depending on how long you want to stay in Argentina (if it's just a few months, I would try to find someone who could take care of the dog instead of flying back and forth).
Sorry to hear about your dog. Perhaps the stress of the plane ride played a part in triggering the cancer.

Personally, I would not put a dog in a plane unless the move was permanent.
 
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