COVID-19 vaccine development pipeline gears up

gracielle

Registered
24 June 2020
Plasma: what it is, how it works and why it is one of the most promising treatments against COVID-19
In the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic, and when the entire world is in a race against the clock to find a vaccine or, at least, find a safe drug to stop this new virus, the plasma of recovered patients appears as the best alternative, since which, according to experts, is the only "remedy" that is available today. However, being such a scarce resource, it is essential to appeal to the solidarity of potential donors and bring them the peace of mind that the extraction procedure does not entail any risk to their health. In this interview with Infobae , Dr. Luis Sarotto (MN 78073), president of the Medical Association of the Hospital de Clínicas and full professor of Surgery at the University of Buenos Aires, clears all doubts.....


 

FrankPintor

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There's a lot of publicity about plasma, but it's really scarce, I think you need 100ml per dose, so 200ml of blood, and you need to be sure the donors got a good dose of the virus so they really did produce antibodies (they prefer male donors, since we get hit harder), so I don't think it's really useful on a large scale (unless the cloning in your first post here works).
 

Alpinista

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There is apparently a black market for this. A weird thought: If someone is living in poverty, young and healthy with no underlying conditions, he would probably be tempted to get the bug and make some money out of it.
 

artisans

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"During a regular blood donation, you will give around 470 ml of whole blood. This is about eight per cent of the average adult's blood volume. The body replaces this volume within 24 to 48 hours, and replenishes red blood cells in 10 to 12 weeks."
Lamentably, at this time, Buenos Aires and surrounds looks to be producing an abundance of donor types. Overe 2000 yesterday, 24 June, alone.
 

gracielle

Registered
There is apparently a black market for this. A weird thought: If someone is living in poverty, young and healthy with no underlying conditions, he would probably be tempted to get the bug and make some money out of it.
Not weird at all. But according to what is being reported on the media, the donor will not receive a remuneration. And the health authority decides who will be the recipient.
 

gracielle

Registered
"During a regular blood donation, you will give around 470 ml of whole blood. This is about eight per cent of the average adult's blood volume. The body replaces this volume within 24 to 48 hours, and replenishes red blood cells in 10 to 12 weeks."
Lamentably, at this time, Buenos Aires and surrounds looks to be producing an abundance of donor types. Overe 2000 yesterday, 24 June, alone.
"Todo por la patria"...
 

gracielle

Registered
25 June 2020
Fernando Polack: "We still don't know if convalescent plasma is used to treat the coronavirus"
The prestigious doctor, one of the world's leading experts in respiratory viral diseases, heads the foundation that is currently investigating whether the plasma of those who suffered from COVID-19 helps to mitigate the effects of the virus on newly infected people....


25 June 2020
Plasma for everyone? Why massive experimental treatment for COVID-19 is not possible
Convalescent plasma has become one of the most widely used treatments against coronavirus, against the failure of drugs that generate adverse effects. There are several requirements to donate and also to receive the donation, according to the protocol of each medical institution....

 
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