CUIL/CUIT/DNI/VISA etc...

fairchild

Registered
I have been living here for almost two years on a tourist visa. I have a fulltime job, however at a company that will not give me a work visa as of right now.

I am so tired of renewing my tourist visa, worrying about IF i can continue to renew it, not being able to have a bank account etc.

I need to do something to change my status but really am not sure where to start. I am wondering if anyone could please lend me some advice on what sort of visa i could apply for (if i can), whether i can apply for a CUIL or CUIT (and if that would help me) or any other advice.

At this point I am just considering marrying my Argentine boyfriend ~ but the whole 'marriage out of convenience' doesn't appeal to me ;)

Any advice would be very much appreciated!!
 

steveinbsas

Registered
fairchild said:
I have been living here for almost two years on a tourist visa. I have a fulltime job, however at a company that will not give me a work visa as of right now.

I am so tired of renewing my tourist visa, worrying about IF i can continue to renew it, not being able to have a bank account etc.

I need to do something to change my status but really am not sure where to start. I am wondering if anyone could please lend me some advice on what sort of visa i could apply for (if i can), whether i can apply for a CUIL or CUIT (and if that would help me) or any other advice.

At this point I am just considering marrying my Argentine boyfriend ~ but the whole 'marriage out of convenience' doesn't appeal to me ;)

Any advice would be very much appreciated!!
I'm not qualified to give you personal advice, but I do believe that you should be aware of your legal options.

It looks like you are in the perfect position to become the parent of an Argentine. You won't have to marry your boyfriend as long as the child is born in Argentina. You don't even have to use your boyfriend as the sperm donor though using him probably would be most convenient.

http://www.associatedcontent.com/article/360202/how_to_get_a_permanent_residence_visa.html?cat=17
 

Attorney in BA

Registered
You can see this link for a detail of all visa options.
http://www.fandinoabogados.com/english/migraciones.html

If, as Steve said, you're considering having a child, and he/she is born in Argentina, you could apply for a permanent visa.

Also, if you have a job here (even if you're not registered), you are entitled to all the benefits established in the labor laws. So if you are fired when you get pregnant, or in any way harassed, you can sue for your rights.

If you have any questions you may contact me through my website www.fandinoabogados.com or by email at info@fandinoabogados.com
 

jp

Registered
I think you can do a civil union as well. Less formal than a marriage, easily dissolved but gives you rights and priviledges that I think include residency.

Worth looking into. Not particularly romantic, but a hell of a lot easier than getting married to avoid border runs...
 

Attorney in BA

Registered
Immigration law says "conyuge" (spouse), and I'm not sure if it includes the Union Civil. I haven't seen any request for visa based on an Union civil (but can't say for sure it's not admitted).

"ARTICULO 22. - Se considerará "residente permanente" a todo extranjero que, con el propósito de establecerse definitivamente en el país, obtenga de la Dirección Nacional de Migraciones una admisión en tal carácter. Asimismo, se considerarán residentes permanentes los inmigrantes parientes de ciudadanos argentinos, nativos o por opción, entendiéndose como tales al cónyuge, hijos y padres."

We'd have to check the law that instituted the Union Civil in the city of Buenos Aires, to see what rights it grants. I think that you could at least argue something on a constitutional level if the request was denied.
 

fairchild

Registered
I certainly do appreciate all the comments, but i must say i really was joking about the marriage thing. Nor am i having a child here. Sorry if I directed the question in the wrong way!

I would like to live here on something more stable than a tourist visa ~ any advice towards that would help me!!!

Thanks
 

mini

Registered
If you do try to get your visa, I suggest you do NOT tell them you currently have an full time job & are working here. There was another post about something similar the person was being threatened with deportation. Technically what you are doing is illegal so don't mention it to the officials.
 

Attorney in BA

Registered
mini said:
If you do try to get your visa, I suggest you do NOT tell them you currently have an full time job & are working here. There was another post about something similar the person was being threatened with deportation. Technically what you are doing is illegal so don't mention it to the officials.
What mini says is correct. Avoid saying you have a job. If you do have any labor trouble the situation would have to be studied in detail, both from a labor and an immigration standpoint.

Explore your visa options and see if you can qualify for any of the other categories (rentier? pensioner?). This could even be set up with your own funds (invested) in some way that you get them back as a "rent".
 

Adios_USA

Registered
I am no authority, but I hear an affordable and easy to qualify way to stay long term is with a Student Visa, renewable yearly. You will need to register in a course, like say spanish. It just needs to be a course held at a location that is registered with Migraciones. Then at the end of 3 years you can theoretically qualify for permanent residency. I will use this option if for some reason my Rentista Visa isn't renewable.
 

Hellek

Registered
I figured it would be best to ask my questions here instead of opening a new topic, since it is closely related:
Is rentista of use when I plan to stay for i.e. 8 months (since it demands proof of rent for 3 years)? What kind of proof do they really want? I had a hard time finding explanations about the easiest/most convenient ways of fulfilling the rentier requirements.

Concerning what I could do as rentista and what not, is the following right?
- I can open a bank account in Argentina, have a mobile phone contract (instead of prepaid), etc. since I get a DNI
- I am not allowed to work

My situation is that I am finishing my studies and want some experience abroad. I already know the city from a language course I did there. Now I am writing lots of applications for weeks already, but without any success. If I don't find anything, I will go anyway. Being in BsAs I could then be available for interviews and continue to build new contacts, hopefully resulting in an employment/internship. I have put money aside for this project since, even in Austria, internships are often underpaid or unpaid so I don't expect to be able to make a living as an intern.
 
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