Didn't Receive 90 Day Stamp Upon Re-Entry To Arg. In Iguazu

westofwall

Registered
So, I was recently in Iguazu and visited both sides of the falls.

Upon re-entering Arg., I was stamped with a new entry date, but did not receive the additional stamped or handwritten "90 Dias" entry in my passport. The agent did sign his name on the stamp but made no other entry.

I did not overstay my original 90 day visa before going to Brazil and I was just there during part of one day, coming back to Arg. in the late afternoon.

Has anyone else not received a stamp showing length of stay allowed upon re-entry from a day trip to Colonia or elsewhere? If so, was it assumed to be a normal 90 day visa from the new entry date?

I'm not sure if it was an oversight on the agent's part or possibly means that I was not extended an additional 90 days and am subject to the original 90 day limit to avoid the overstay penalty?

Thanks.
 

steveinbsas

Registered
It would be interesting (and possibly helpful) to know how many 90 day stamps you already had in your passport, if you have previously overstayed or got your last 90 day stamp at migraciones in Retiro.
 

ElQueso

Registered
The stamp you get is not a "visa", they are just letting you in (which is within the immigration official's purview, as long as you have not been denied entry through the court system - tourists under visa waiver are allowed by law 90 days on entry, with another 90 day extension at immigrations, for a total of 180 days per year). By law, that stamp is only good for 90 days and it's really only keeping you from having to pay the overstay fee/penalty by getting that stamp. Beware that the immigrations official who stamps your passport can decide to flag your passport so that it goes through a court case which gives you 30 days to apply for residency or citizenship (the results of which you may not see if the letter issued by the court does not find you at whatever address you gave them) and if that happens and you pass the 30 days of the letter, they may not let you in again if you leave and come back.

Not trying to panic you, but you should be aware of this. There were a couple of posts last year about people (by those people) who were denied entry (you might use "denied entry" as a search result to see more) along with reports of other hearsay denials of entry. It doesn't seem to be a common occurrence (yet).
 

westofwall

Registered
Steve, I have been coming to Arg. every year for 6 or 7 years. I overstayed for the first time last year, staying about 6 months without going out of Arg. My current 90 period ends in early February. I'm traveling under an EU passport, if that matters (no reciprocity fee was ever due).

ElQueso: I know it's not a visa, just not sure what you call it, so that's my placeholder word! I am aware of the various rules about length of stay, extensions, etc. Hopefully this isn't the prelude to something bad and he did let me back in with no comments or warnings.

I guess what's not clear is whether the agent did this on purpose or by accident. I forgot to mention something which is probably relevant: I was with two other people, one of whom is here in Arg. for the first time and one who has my history. The other two were inside the 90 day window, too and we all did not receive a 90 day stamp.
 

cwo4uscgret

Registered
Like the 90 Temporary Visitor for Business (WB) or Pleasure (WT) entry into the US that from many countries does not require a Visa (Visa Waiver Program) everytime you leave or enter the US on the 90 Day Stamp it does not change the end date of the 90 day period of time.

I suspect the same holds true in Argentina; you are in the middle of a 90 day temporary stay that is still valid. Anything past the end date is an overstay.
 

steveinbsas

Registered
Like the 90 Temporary Visitor for Business (WB) or Pleasure (WT) entry into the US that from many countries does not require a Visa (Visa Waiver Program) everytime you leave or enter the US on the 90 Day Stamp it does not change the end date of the 90 day period of time.

I suspect the same holds true in Argentina; you are in the middle of a 90 day temporary stay that is still valid. Anything past the end date is an overstay.
It isn't the same here. Many expats have been applying that line of thinking to the 90 day visa and have been making repeated trips to Uruguay every 90 days to stay "legit" with migraciones while they are not in compliance with the immigration laws of Argentina by doing so.

In spite of reading the correct information, many of them cling to their suppositions and continue to make the "visa runs" to Colonia which usually results in getting a new entry stamp that "grants" 90 more days.

I'm not sure how often the 90 days are indicated in writing on the new stamp as I never made the run..
 

ElQueso

Registered
Argentina simply has policies in immigrations that allow people to be here, if they are from a country with visa waiver status (or Mercosur status, possibly others), in violation of the actual immigrations law mandating the 90/180 day maximum stay. Like in the US (and most, if not all, other countries), the immigrations official actually has to power to make that decision (although, realistically, policy may require that agent to clear any denial of entry with his/her supervisor).

WestOfWall, sorry if I was being somewhat pedantic. I also wrote the comment for anyone reading this thread because it's been a little while since anyone mentioned the "visa run" and possible consequences.

But by law, what's important is the stamp with the entry date in your passport - because it's the law that declares the 90/180 limits and the absence of the stamp saying "90 days" doesn't mean anything as far as I'm aware. I have a few stamps in my passport from some 7years ago when I didn't understand the whole "visa run" thing clearly (which is a reason I usually comment about this when the "visa run" comes up), that states "3 months" which is not accurate either (probably why they changed it to be "90 days" later).
 

westofwall

Registered
Thanks all for your responses!

El Queso, I think/hope that you're right that the lack of '90 day' extra stamp won't be big issue. It's probably much ado about nothing, and hopefully not a policy change to stop 'visa run' type trips.

I'll know for sure when I leave Arg. in a month or two and will let everyone know what happens...
 

ajoknoblauch

Registered
I cross the border frequently when traveling in Patagonia, as I will be for the next two months, and the Argentines invariably give me a new 90 days every time - even if I've only been in Chile for a few days.
 
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