Different types of visas/DNI- benefits /disadvantages?

darmanad

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The thread on the change of $ requirements for a rentista visa has triggered my curiousity about the various forms of visas/residence available to non-Argentines. Is there a website that has a comprenhensive overview of the benefits and disadvantages to the various visas and types of residence available to non-citizens? Something which will provide good practical advice, not just technical data.
I prefer to minimize my involvment with government, especially taxing authorities, and have always believed a 3 month renewable tourist visa was preferable to anything else since I do not reside full time in Argentina (although it is approaching 6 months a year). Are there some benefits to a rentista visa or any other form of visa which I should consider? I have a local bank account, opened when I bought an apt in BA (registered with the authorities in my name). Thus far, I have contented myself with leaving before the 3 month tourist visa expires (although I realize the penalties for overstaying are not great) Are the penalties for staying in the country for more than 6 months in 1 year on a tourist visa more severe?
 

mini

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Getting a resident visa probably won't make a difference except when you want to sell your apartment. Apparently, so I hear, you can find a surprise as a non-resident trying to sell.
 

gunt86

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darmanad said:
Is there a website that has a comprenhensive overview of the benefits and disadvantages to the various visas and types of residence available to non-citizens? Something which will provide good practical advice, not just technical data.
http://www.argentinaresidency.com/

benefits to a visa (rentista or other non-tourist type):
-able to get a DNI
-able to get subsidized airfare on Aerolineas Argentinas
-able to open bank account
-able to get a monthly cell phone plan
-able to work legally
-able to apply for permanent residency after a few years
-easier to import personal goods duty free
-can get a driver's permit
-can buy a vehicle
-able to sell property without the 'rentiers' tax
 

French jurist

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gunt86 said:
http://www.argentinaresidency.com/

benefits to a visa (rentista or other non-tourist type):
-able to get a DNI
-able to get subsidized airfare on Aerolineas Argentinas
-able to open bank account
-able to get a monthly cell phone plan
-able to work legally
-able to apply for permanent residency after a few years
-easier to import personal goods duty free
-can get a driver's permit
-can buy a vehicle
-able to sell property without the 'rentiers' tax

Correct, except that one can buy a vehicle with just a tourist visa
 

darmanad

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gunt86 said:
http://www.argentinaresidency.com/

benefits to a visa (rentista or other non-tourist type):
-able to get a DNI
-able to get subsidized airfare on Aerolineas Argentinas
-able to open bank account
-able to get a monthly cell phone plan
-able to work legally
-able to apply for permanent residency after a few years
-easier to import personal goods duty free
-can get a driver's permit
-can buy a vehicle
-able to sell property without the 'rentiers' tax

Thank you. Quickly perused the link. I am not sure what privileges a DNI provides in addition to the ones you listed, but I suspect it triggers tax consequences so I don't think it is something I want. The only practical benefit to me of those you list is the airfare subsidy and given my limited flying patterns it isn't a biggie. I would never drive in BA and the higher rates for cell phone prepaid cards are not a major outlay given my aversion to protracted cell phone conversation.
I understand there may be some hangup if and when I sell my apartment ( esp if I neglect to pay all taxes as they fall due), but I strongly suspect that will be a matter for my heirs to confront.
 

steveinbsas

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The obvious reason to have a resident visa is to be able to legally reside in Argentina for more than six months in any 12 month period (without leaving the country).

It also allows a property owner the bienes personales tax exemption if the value of their property and auto(s) total less than $305,000 pesos. Without it, the tax rate foreigners must pay is 1.25 percent. Note: This is not the ABL tax and apparently many nonresident property owners don't even know about the tax which carries an interest rate of 2% per month on any unpaid balance owed.
 

gunt86

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darmanad said:
I suspect it triggers tax consequences so I don't think it is something I want.
I understand there may be some hangup if and when I sell my apartment ( esp if I neglect to pay all taxes as they fall due), but I strongly suspect that will be a matter for my heirs to confront.
Are you a US citizen? if so, then having a non-tourist visa for living in ARG will allow you to be a tax resident of Argentina, which means that you will be able to exclude about US$100k from your US taxes. in addition, all taxes you pay in ARG, can be deducted from your US taxes.
About your apartment, the issue is that as you are not a resident, the gvmt assumes you are renting out your apartment, and they assess a tax based on what they assume your rental income is...you must pay that every year or face interest on the tax (like 25% or something harsh). I have a friend who sold an apt after 6 years and made nothing on the sale as all his profits went to pay the ARG gvmt taxes because he was not a resident.

I am going to put this as clearly as I can: if you reside in ARG on a tourist visa, but are actually living here permanently, then you are taking a risk. Laws do change, and they change rapidly, and they change usually not in your favor. It is entirely possible that the gvmt decides to seize all the property owned by tourists. The only way to protect yourself from future law changes is to get yourself legal rights per your legal status in the country. For example, being an illegal immigrant in the US used to be not a big deal, but things have gotten harder and harder recently..
 

Maikito

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All I can say is that by becoming a resident I gained peace of mind. Now I just want to get my driver's licence which seems to be another hassle.
 

steveinbsas

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gunt86 said:
I am going to put this as clearly as I can: if you reside in ARG on a tourist visa, but are actually living here permanently, then you are taking a risk. Laws do change, and they change rapidly, and they change usually not in your favor. It is entirely possible that the gvmt decides to seize all the property owned by tourists. The only way to protect yourself from future law changes is to get yourself legal rights per your legal status in the country. For example, being an illegal immigrant in the US used to be not a big deal, but things have gotten harder and harder recently..

This is as clear as a bell. No one has said it better!

Though I don't see the government seizing property owned by non-residents in the near future, this is Argentina, and hammer is clearly on it's way down.
 

darmanad

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steveinbsas said:
The obvious reason to have a resident visa is to be able to legally reside in Argentina for more than six months in any 12 month period (without leaving the country).

It also allows a property owner the bienes personales tax exemption if the value of their property and auto(s) total less than $305,000 pesos. Without it, the tax rate foreigners must pay is 1.25 percent. Note: This is not the ABL tax and apparently many nonresident property owners don't even know about the tax which carries an interest rate of 2% per month on any unpaid balance owed.

Its academic for me, but I thought the property tax did not kick in until one had domestic assets of 305K irrepsective of whether they have a resident visa or not.
And if the rate of inflation is 25% per year, then what is the real financial penalty for not paying the real estate tax on an apt worth more than 305K pesos?
 
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