Digital nomad visa questions

perro y lobo

Registered
1. The only regulation is regarding to get it. I have many cases that were applied with 2 weeks in Argentina.
Long term lease?
Depending who is the judge, it is going to be process righ away of after you have 2 years here.
2. The right to inhabit is at the Bill of Rights.
To apply protects you from deportation.
Forget about student visas.
We have freedom of religion. It means you can apply under muslim requirements (legal everything), or under Christian requirements: to inhabit.
3. They double check it. If you do not apply for student visa, you do not get a deportation order, simple.
Do US and or European citizens get deported from Argentina?
 

perro y lobo

Registered
1. The only regulation is regarding to get it. I have many cases that were applied with 2 weeks in Argentina.
Long term lease?
Depending who is the judge, it is going to be process righ away of after you have 2 years here.
2. The right to inhabit is at the Bill of Rights.
To apply protects you from deportation.
Forget about student visas.
We have freedom of religion. It means you can apply under muslim requirements (legal everything), or under Christian requirements: to inhabit.
3. They double check it. If you do not apply for student visa, you do not get a deportation order, simple.
Does the Right to inhabit also apply if you own a house and land in Argentina?
 

mark-tango

Registered
Hello group!

I just joined the forum, hoping you can give me some advice or your view regarding a question.
Since about five years I frequently travel to BsAs as a tourist as i fell in love with the city and dace tango for year now.
The topic is a bit old here, but besides the fact that there is a lots of discussion going on regarding citizenship, the topic perfectly hits my question.

Visa for "digital nomads".

I would like to hear your opinion if a person working remotely for their employer in their home country, in their fixed contract, with an account in their country, paying taxes in their country, would have to apply for a special visa? Currently I do not plan to stay longer than the 90 days. So the aspect of the duration of the stay is not that important in my case.

Of course I know this has a theoretical (what is the law?) and a practical (who should find out?) aspect :). Currently I am more interested in the theoretical aspect.

Thanks for any Input!

Mark
 

cbbsas

Registered
Hello group!

I just joined the forum, hoping you can give me some advice or your view regarding a question.
Since about five years I frequently travel to BsAs as a tourist as i fell in love with the city and dace tango for year now.
The topic is a bit old here, but besides the fact that there is a lots of discussion going on regarding citizenship, the topic perfectly hits my question.

Visa for "digital nomads".

I would like to hear your opinion if a person working remotely for their employer in their home country, in their fixed contract, with an account in their country, paying taxes in their country, would have to apply for a special visa? Currently I do not plan to stay longer than the 90 days. So the aspect of the duration of the stay is not that important in my case.

Of course I know this has a theoretical (what is the law?) and a practical (who should find out?) aspect :). Currently I am more interested in the theoretical aspect.

Thanks for any Input!

Mark
Hi mark, it depends which country the person is coming from, can you clarify if you’re US, UK, something else?
 

JohnPaul2

Registered
@Bajo_cero2: first of all many thanks for all the information on this forum

My situation: I came here regularly as a Tourist to Argentina, in 2014 I was more or less for one 1 year here. Then I was living for three years in the UK, and now since August 2018 I live here in Buenos Aires permanently. I am married to an Argentinian Citizen, I have two Children (and I own a property here, in my Name). So technically it should not be a problem to get permanent residency. I also attempted twice to get it. The first time I was ill prepared (documents not legally translated etc), the second attempt was then a pure technicality (I did the electronic process, and the when I showed up at imigraciones, I didn't have the receipt for the payment with me). So I am still on a Tourist Visum here. (and tax wise that is obviously even the better solution, as I am neither registered in Europe nor in Argentina).
I do work remotely for my own company in Europe. Twice a year I go to the UK for 2-3 weeks (work related), and twice per year I go usually to Colonia. So far I dont have any overstays here.
What is actually the risk that I am facing in entering in Ezeiza (coming from Europe) or in Colonia? What I hear among my expat friends here: some are living here for 10 years on a Tourist Visum without any problems.
So far I thought that I could still mention that I am married and have two kids in Argentina. I could also mention that I tried to get my residency solved (I am registered at least that I applied twice). So I always thought that the Risk of actually being rejected at EZE or Colonia is actually very small (probably in Colonia a bit higher).
What is the Risk from a tax point of view? Could they argue that I have to pay tax retrospectively or is it always applying then from the point where I would get the permanent residency?
 

Bajo_cero2

Registered
Nowadays and in future the Colonia runs are dead because there are going to be tight controls because of the pandemia.
In my opinion, you might have a deportation order in process because this is what happens when you fail to get residency. So, you should ask for a vista of your file having in mind that you have 3 working days to appeal after that. It means that you then must submit all the papers. However, now, your issue is to prove your income here, something they are going to request.
In my opinion, your have a trasightforward case for citizenship having spoons and children argentines while at the DNU 70/2017 it does not really matters.
You can apply by yourself because the DNU didn't affect the marriage and paternity or art. 2.2 of law 346 but then you have to wait until the quarantine is over.
Last week there was a decisión of the Chamber of appeals that, plus an administrative decision of Supreme Court, allow the work 100% digital. It means that if you hire a lawyer, you can start the case right away. This is important, no matter how long it takes (because you cannot do the fingerprints or domicile certificate our translations) because there are new leading precedents that bans the deportation or rejection at the border of citizenship applicants.
Having a local family is difficult for you to be rejected, forget the Colonia runs however, but they might think you are a criminal and for this reason you didn´t apply for legal residency.
For the citizenship case your foreign income is Ok.
Spanish was banned by SC as a requirement recently.
 
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