Discriminatory pricing for foreign travelers

#1
My wife and I will be wintering in Buenos Aires and want to see some of the country. In my initial research it has become quickly obvious that there are two price lists for everything - one price for Argentines and a higher price for foreigners. As a foreign national, how do you beat this price discrimination and get the "citizen's" price? Is it recommendable to make reservations through local travel agents instead of on the internet? What methods have you found to get the best airfare and hotel prices? Thanks for your help, and for what looks like a great web site.
 
#2
as far as plane tickets within Argentina, you can't get around the foreigner's price unless you have the DNI from here. the only way to beat the other foreigner prices on certain trains and things is to hang out with the locals and let them do all the speaking with the ticket buying while you hide your accent.
 
#3
Why they have had this policy, for years now, of shaking down the visitor is beyond me. I dont know alot of locals who dont believe the politicians just steal it.
Does anyone believe when the military govt. sold their "patramony", a prime chunk of national parkland at Iguazu falls, that they used the money to buy textbooks for kids? A ranger told me that a rich family bought, or he implied bribed, the land inorder to build the Sheraton hotel. rangers arent even allowed on the property without hotel permission.
Double pricing, nationalization of airlines, a bullet train that no one believe will ever exist, all these are just ways for politicians to line their pockets. Its how this place operates.
 

CABJ

Active Member
#4
Travel to a place abroad where you are welcome. Take the bus, which is better, more relaxt and you can see more if you take trips from 12-16 hours at most you will be fine
 
#5
I do understand why foreigners have to pay more to enter national parks
I don't understand why foreigners have to pay more for services and/or goods on the free market.
 
#6
Its not a free market. Its a market part subsidised by taxes paid by residents.

If you are a tax paying resident, you benefit from reduced travel and entrance fees. If you are a tourist, you are expected to pay the full rate. If you want the citizens price, you have to be a citizen. You aren't entitled to free or subsidised healthcare as a tourist for the same reason.

Same practices happen in countries all over the world. In spain domestic flights are cheaper for residents than tourists. In Cambodia locals can visit Angor Wat for free, whereas tourists have to pay. As a tourist you can expect to pay more, just budget accordingly and don't take it too personally :)
 

CABJ

Active Member
#7
"jp" said:
Its not a free market. Its a market part subsidised by taxes paid by residents.

If you are a tax paying resident, you benefit from reduced travel and entrance fees. If you are a tourist, you are expected to pay the full rate. If you want the citizens price, you have to be a citizen. You aren't entitled to free or subsidised healthcare as a tourist for the same reason.

Same practices happen in countries all over the world. In spain domestic flights are cheaper for residents than tourists. In Cambodia locals can visit Angor Wat for free, whereas tourists have to pay. As a tourist you can expect to pay more, just budget accordingly and don't take it too personally :)
In Spain there are gringo prices

 
#8
"jp" said:
If you are a tax paying resident, you benefit from reduced travel and entrance fees. If you are a tourist, you are expected to pay the full rate. If you want the citizens price, you have to be a citizen. You aren't entitled to free or subsidised healthcare as a tourist for the same reason.
Are you sure about public health care as it applies to tourists? As a tourist I went to the emergency room at the public hospital at Cordoba and Uriburu when I had chest pains. They performed an electrocardiogram without charge, refusing payment when I offered. I enrolled in a private health care plan shortly thereafter.

Though I now have "temporary residency" and A DNI, I am still not a citizen, yet I am "entitled" to the discount airfare (though I have yet to take advantage of the discount) and public health care (though I don't want it). I pay IVA on all purchases in Argentina, just like I did when I was tourist, but I pay no other taxes in Argentina (except for the departure tax at the airport, a portion of the social security taxes for the porteras in my apartment building, and ABL), and I can actually get a partial tax refund on some retail purchases if I submit the appropriate form whenever I depart EZE (though I have yet to do that, either).
 
#10
"CABJ" said:
Foreigners don´t need to pay for public hospitals, Argentines must pay
Except for those from neighboring countries who come to Argentina to work and don't really have any money, what foreigner (especially a tourist) would ever want to go to a public hospital in Argentina? One brief visit on a Sunday morning (able and willing to pay) was enough for me. I enrolled with a private provider in the next week. Any Argentine with sufficient income does the same. It looks like business in these plans is booming: Their waiting rooms are usually full.