Do Argentines Know the meaning of fresh

markus

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"tangobob" said:
DQ please I was not whinging, just an observation. It really seems to me that the Argentines do not like thier bread and pastries fresh.
I agree with Sergio you can get better veg from the street vendors, but if that is the case, why not buy from them? they are cheaper as well.
Tangobob, don't pay attention to that guy... He must belong to some weird pro-argentine cult LOL
 

Marc

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Cut it out you lot!Argentines are like anyone else in the world, maybe even a bit more fussy.Fresh veg? Who gives a shit?Go out and find it. There's loads out there.This continual Arg bashing really does my fucking head in. Get real.
 

tangobob

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Apologies to those of you who are not the knockers. I started this thread as a bit of a joke, because Argentines seem to prefer their pastries and cakes at least a day old. Not so much a criticism more an observation.
I should have know what would happen. Sorry!
Lets call it a day.
 

perry

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Food in Buenos Aires is as fresh as anywhere in the World and the quality in general is very high.
The meat here which is grass fed and eaten very quick after slaughter is the best and freshest on earth. The icecream is one of the Worlds Best and there are literally hundreds of Bread shops with excellent Breads and Pastries.
I do no see any evidence of stale food here . There is extremely little food that is lefted in Baymaries for many hours waiting to be served . In Australia where I grew up the quality of fast food was absolutely terrible. Stale sausages and Dim Sums, Chiko Rolls and Battered Fish and Chips was the norm.
Just about everything you order here is cooked at the moment using very good ingredients. I have had no food poisoning here by the way and have lived here for many years.
 

jennesis

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The food here is mostly good quality. There is some poorer quality also sometimes, just like anywhere. In less than two years I had food poisoning twice! Was my own fault suppose, the places were a bit dodgy...
 

kurtdillard

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Lots of good points and suggestions already made in this post that I won't repeat. A key difference between Latin America and the US is that they don't use as many hormones and chemicals to make their produce and farm animals look so big and brilliant. They do use pesticides and fertilizer in Argentina, and I'm not sure that the food is always healthier from the perspective of an organic afficiando since I don't know how much pesticide they do use, but they don't do all the stuff manufacturers to in the US such as spraying apples with wax and injecting cattle, pigs, and chicken with hormones. The result is that the meat often looks scrawnier than what you might be used to. Well, chicken's aren't supposed to have breasts that weigh 500 grams each, apples aren't supposed to reflect your face as well as a mirror, and lettuce isn't supposed to arrive in 2 kg heads. At least, not in nature:)
 

Tomokoar

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As I understand, the Argentians do not like to have scones and cakes too warm.
They wait for them cold and they have...
They love home- made milanesas and pizzas cold, too.
 

sergio

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I find the quality of vegetables in the supermarkets to be quite disappointiong, especially considering that Argentina is an agricultural country. You can get better quality from some street vendors however there should be fresher lettuce and other vegetables, and greater variety, in the supermarkets as you will find in many countries. There are many bakeries in BA but my experience has been that almost all are quite poor. They use lard instead of butter, lots of artificial ingredients, have little imagination and often sell products one or two days old. Even Dos Escudos, probably the classiest of the bakeries, does this. It's true that Argentine beef is generally healthier (lower cholesterol) and I quite like bife de lomo however I find other cuts such as roast beef better in the US. I have heard that Argentine beef producers are starting to get away from grain fed beef. Is this true? Maybe someone out there has some information. As for chickens, I believe they are raised in the same way as other countries - not grass fed. I am used to eating organic chicken and find chicken in Argentina tasteless.
 

ramon

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The quality of cakes is very poor. Artifical flavours and too much sugar . Very cheap ingredients are often used to sell something .
Fruits are always non existent in cakes here and nuts are like gold bars used in the most tiny qualities.
Where is the generosity and warmth in the food here.
 

sergio

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Ramon mentions nuts. There is poor quality control in Argentina, so be VERY careful when eating some cakes - or fruit-cake type confection - that you do not break a tooth on a hard piece of nut shell. Ramon is right about the excessive amount of sugar in sweets. This, though, seems to be a Latin American characteristic and not just Argentina. I find it hard to get jam that has any fruit flavor due to the excessive amount of sugar. There is one "national" brand of preserves sold at Disco that consists of fruit only. It's rather expensive but much better than the rest.
 
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