English literature: Shakespeare

bf4

Active Member
#1
Could anybody give me a hint or two with this portion of A&C?




Eno. Never; he will not:



Age cannot wither her, nor custom stale



Her infinite variety; other women cloy
272


The appetites they feed, but she makes hungry



Where most she satisfies; for vilest things



Become themselves in her, that the holy priests



Bless her when she is riggish





i only understand that even old she will be beautiful but what is meant by what follows?

Many thanks in advance
 
#2
The extract you reproduced is from Shakespeare´s Anthony and Cleopatra: Act II. Scene II. There are companion books to shakespear´s plays that can be used to understand them better. Additionally some books have the modern english translation side by side the original text.
 

bf4

Active Member
#3
Thanks Baires, I know that it is A&C (I have been analysing with an literature teacher) but I thought that among so many american and brits sbdy might have read it as well. After all Shakespeare is to brits, what Borges is to us
Regards,
B.
 
#4
"bf4" said:
Thanks Baires, I know that it is A&C (I have been analysing with an literature teacher) but I thought that among so many american and brits sbdy might have read it as well. After all Shakespeare is to brits, what Borges is to us.
The passage is self-explanatory except the last bit about "riggish." The line:



"Age cannot wither her, nor custom stale




Her infinite variety."
is one of the more famous ones from Shakespeare (comparable to "Et tu, Brute" and "Friends, Romans, Countrymen, lend me your ears.")
"A&C" is of course a sequel to "Julius Caesar," but played on a global stage -- the backdrop is the Roman empire in its heyday.
 

bf4

Active Member
#5
thanks badwolf,
how would you traduce for me either in modern english or spanish
NOR CUSTOM STALE HER INFINITE VARIETY
thanks in advance
B
 
#6
"bf4" said:
NOR CUSTOM STALE HER INFINITE VARIETY
Prolonged exposure to her wouldn't lead to feelings of boredom and jadedness because she was capable of appearing, talking, and behaving differently each time.
 

bf4

Active Member
#7
Mil gracias, Wolf
The teacher I had said it had sexual connotations but as you see it it's more general.
Regards,
B
 
#8
"bf4" said:
The teacher I had said it had sexual connotations but as you see it it's more general.
Your teacher is right but I didn't want to allude to it. The connotation is clear if the line is examined in the context of the passage.