English Words Used in Buenos Aires

Moonwitch

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ha everybody has said my ones. The most common ones I come across is OK. I can do a very OK in an Argentine accent. I'm very proud.
 

Delfina

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I like this one:

Chimichurri:There are various fanciful etymologies for the word. One story claims that it comes from 'Jimmy McCurry', an Irishman who is said to have first prepared the sauce. He was marching with the troops of General Jasson Ospina in the 19th century, sympathetic to the cause of Argentine Independence. The sauce was popular and the recipe was passed on. However, 'Jimmy McCurry' was difficult for the native people to say. Some sources claim Jimmy's sauce's name was corrupted to 'chimichurri', while others say it was changed in his honor.
Other similar stories involve Jimmy Curry, an English meat importer; a Scot, James C. Hurray, travelling with gauchos; and an English family in Patagonia overheard by the group of Argentinians that were with them while saying "give me the curry". All the stories share an English speaking colonist and the corruption of names or words by the local population.
The Argentinian gourmet Miguel Brasco claims that the word chimichurri originated when British were taken prisoner after England tried to invade the Spanish colony of Argentina. The prisoners asked for condiment for their food mixing english, aboriginal and Spanish (castilian) words. Che-mi-curry stands for "che mi salsa" (dame condimento) or "give me curry". Later "che-mi-curry" corrupted to chimichurri." (Wikipedia)
 

CoachGayle

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ghost said:
Open is used frequently.
My favorite is FULL. Just pass by any used car lot and on many windshields you will see "FULL".


and of course FULL is pronounced just like FOOL.

It me smile when my friends here say they have a "FOOL HOUSE"
or that they are working "A FOOL."......
 

fifs2

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don´t you love when they talk about "un smoking"..meaning a smoking jacket or god knows mabe a dinner jacket..and someone please tell Leader Price they got their words in the wrong order..drives me mad everytime I see it on the way into work...
 

SaraSara

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fifs2 said:
don´t you love when they talk about "un smoking"..meaning a smoking jacket or god knows mabe a dinner jacket..

Tuxedos are called smokings here - "un smoking" = a tuxedo.
 

fifs2

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ah ha I suspected so..but was yearning for the old days of men in velveteen jackets puffing on their cigars whilst the ladies retired to play bridge after dinner....
 

gusgutier

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Carlosgreat said:
Interesting how languages influenciate each other here there are more:
pulover (pullover) sueter (sweater), pantymedias, PC (personal computer) tela satin, boulevar (possibly french), sandwich, wiskey, short (pants), snack (also snack-bar), playstation, picknic, DVD, CD, walkman, mouse, pc, aerobics, lunch,tenis, bus, express, motocross, notebook, call center, laptop, cd-rom, short, diskette, DVD, modem, ethernet, basketball, too much, gillete, long play (disk) flash (camera), light, lifting (facial surgery),rafting, personal trainer, etc.
Some of these words are the name of new things so proper word in spanish doesn´t exists. E.g. , some days ago i was tryng to buy "una base para que mi notebook (un cuaderno?) no recaliente ". Just asked for a cooling pad.
 

gusgutier

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SaraSara said:
"Es muy guau" for wow, or great.
You`re taking the Disney channel mexican translation. If you are going to a boliche (dancing place not a bowling) and a you like some boy, say " ese chabon tiene onda" not " el chaval es guay"
 

SaraSara

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gusgutier said:
You`re taking the Disney channel mexican translation.

No, I'm going by what my teenage niece uses. I asked her what she meant by saying "Es muy guau", and she kindly spelled the word for me.
 
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