Expats in Buenos Aires, Argentina -news article-

RWS

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No writer credited for the article, but I think that she (or he) was asking in this forum for leads a week or two ago.
 

Lucas

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Well, yes that's interesting just "Por Clarin" no credit at all to the writer of the note.

Anyway according to the article one of the interviewed was Terrence Henry

Biography: Terrence Henry

"Terrence Henry is a former journalist who entered "temporary retirement" earlier this year and moved with his wife to Buenos Aires, Argentina. He plans to spend his days there devouring huge steaks, hunting for bargain wines, and making all the dishes he's never had time to until now. He is also writing a book about his adventures in "retirement."

From the magazine The Atlantic Monthly.

In Food Today

Author articles: Terrence Henry

Here are some links of his latest articles, interesting to read.

In Recession, Good News for Diners

One-Way Ticket to Buenos Aires
 

LiXueLee

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I was in the article and the writers are interns from the Columbia School of Journalism -- very nice young women. I wrote some about the experience and what got them on the subject matter in the first place in my latest blog post if you want to learn more!

I think they attended the last BA Expats lunch as well!
 

2GuysInPM

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Thanks for the article link. :)

Maybe I'm getting this wrong, but I find their use of the yearly number of "permanent" residency applicants to denote newcomers (as a result of the crisis), is somewhat misleading...

To apply for "permanent" residency, one must have already been here at least 3 years with "temporary" residency. Which means those numbers from Migraciones represent people who have been here for at least 3 years or more under a temporary residency visa. Those people, I presume, did not come here "running away from the [2008] crisis" as the article implies.
 

Lucas

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Thanks LiXueLee for the link...but I wish to add something, Michelle Reeves on the video is talking about a decision they made 2 years before (2007?) according to they presumption of a worsening financial situation, and they were right on that one.

Similar case with Terrence Henry they were considering that the immediate future is bleak and to escape this period they must move now and wait until the storm pass, at least will try to live comfortably for the time been...but trust me on this one I been there, do that..years pass, kids come along, school, friends, work, etc. etc.

LivingLargeBA, you got a point there, but as I said above many people may a decision to move well before the crisis began on they own vision and logic that the situation wasn't going to improve but just to get worse.
 

cavemanugh

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Yes, the 2 girls as well as the fellow talking about agriculture were all at the BAExpat Luncheon. Really nice people, hope to meet more you guys at future luncheons.
 

2GuysInPM

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Lucas said:
LivingLargeBA, you got a point there, but as I said above many people may a decision to move well before the crisis began on they own vision and logic that the situation wasn't going to improve but just to get worse.
Lucas, thanks for the comment. I don't disagree with the reason to move here, timing, etc. I just find the metric they used in the article somewhat misleading. People have been coming here for many years for hundreds of different reasons. The current economic crisis (or a prediction of one years ago) are valid reasons as well. But those are just two of many, many reasons why someone may have come here, and one cannot assume everyone applying for a permanent residency visa at Migraciones came here just because of those two reasons. I know it wasn't our case at all. For all I know the number of people coming in due to the crisis could be a lot higher or lower than they suggest on the article. It just that metric they use (alone) is not the best measure for it. :)
 
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