Feminist Group

nitehawk57

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Hi everyone,
I'm new here, both in the forum and in the city. I'm a 23-year old woman from Sweden and I was wondering if anyone here knows of any feminist groups/gatherings of some sorts.

If not I'm thinking of starting something like that, where one can meet other feminists and discuss issues of sexism, patriarchy, or just books, tv-shows and movies we like. For me, meeting other feminists is meeting friends.

Anyone interested?
 

StuckLikeGlue

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This is a pretty large group, it's the Buenos Aires "SlutWalk" (an international organization) group, they march and also have events like self-defense workshops.

Code:
https://www.facebook.com/MarchaPutasBA
 

enriquetta

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Hey, I arrive in Buenos Aires in september, I study gender and I think we could maybe start a group of feminist studies. I have lived in Argentina before and I never found such a group, maybe we would have to create our own!
 

robwerwe

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Argentina really needs to treat people more equally. Attitudes towards women are terrible here.
Then again so are they towards Bolivians too.

So don't forget everyone should be treated equally regardless of their sex.
 

Montauk_Project

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Argentina really needs to treat people more equally. Attitudes towards women are terrible here.
Then again so are they towards Bolivians too.

So don't forget everyone should be treated equally regardless of their sex.
how do you think women are treated terribly here?
I am a feminist and have lived here for more than ten years. I am directing my second film (a hard thing for a woman to do in Hollywood) and have never experienced discrimination due to my gender. The president is a woman, 45% of congress is made up of women, lots of women lead companies, no predjudice that women can´t be doctors or scientists (which there are a lot in the US). I think Argentina is ranked as 7 in the world as a good place to be a woman, much ahead of the US and UK.
yes, men may comment a lot on women´s bodies and the TV is quite awful, but I think Argentina is not a bad place to be a woman. Of course this is my opinion and I would like to here other experiences.
This article is about Mexico, but I think it speaks to the larger shift about how younger Latin Americans see machismo as a burden and are more open to new roles for women and do not discriminate against gays as they did before:
http://www.nytimes.com/2013/05/17/opinion/how-latin-culture-got-more-gay.html


This varries a lot by class--I just finished up a documentary that takes place in the Villa 31 and found that gender roles are very defined, with a lot of women becoming young mothers. The documentary is about discrimination that women face when they want to play football, but we used it as an example of how this is the last obstacle for women to overcome.

In the documentary we interviewed Victor Hugo and he had a great quote:
"Who said that machismo is a tool used by men to opress women? Many of the largest proponents of machismo are women. Machismo is a system of discrimination that has as many male as female victims."
 

robwerwe

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how do you think women are treated terribly here?
I am a feminist and have lived here for more than ten years. I am directing my second film (a hard thing for a woman to do in Hollywood) and have never experienced discrimination due to my gender. The president is a woman, 45% of congress is made up of women, lots of women lead companies, no predjudice that women can´t be doctors or scientists (which there are a lot in the US). I think Argentina is ranked as 7 in the world as a good place to be a woman, much ahead of the US and UK.
yes, men may comment a lot on women´s bodies and the TV is quite awful, but I think Argentina is not a bad place to be a woman. Of course this is my opinion and I would like to here other experiences.
This article is about Mexico, but I think it speaks to the larger shift about how younger Latin Americans see machismo as a burden and are more open to new roles for women and do not discriminate against gays as they did before:
http://www.nytimes.c...t-more-gay.html


This varries a lot by class--I just finished up a documentary that takes place in the Villa 31 and found that gender roles are very defined, with a lot of women becoming young mothers. The documentary is about discrimination that women face when they want to play football, but we used it as an example of how this is the last obstacle for women to overcome.

In the documentary we interviewed Victor Hugo and he had a great quote:
"Who said that machismo is a tool used by men to opress women? Many of the largest proponents of machismo are women. Machismo is a system of discrimination that has as many male as female victims."

ahahha do you live in the real world?

Have you seen the adverts asking for you to be a woman and under 30??? That would be illegal in many other countries, not here!
As soon as my blonde flat mate walks down the street she gets called names.
My girlfriend often gets 'touch' on the bus and subte, this rarely happens in developed countries.
There is a general macho culture here if that hasn't passed you by.

Perhaps you've lived here too long and just become used to it.
 

Gringoboy

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Hey, it takes two to tango.
My other half is Argentine and when she walks down the street she attracts all sorts of comments....morocha, quiero morir para vos etc etc.
I asked her about this and whether she ever felt offended. She doesn't and takes it as a compliment.
 

ajoknoblauch

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In the 1990s, I interviewed dozens of Mexicans, straight and gay, in Guadalajara, the country’s second largest city. They spoke about how they wanted their lives to differ from their parents’. Women wanted to be recognized as sexual beings, with legitimate desires and the ability to pursue them. Men felt the old models of machismo were constraining, not empowering. As the anthropologist Matthew Gutmann found in Mexico City around the same time, this was the first generation of Mexicans for whom machismo was a dirty word.

I know the insufferable Gutmann (cited in the article), whom fellow Berkeley anthropology grad students referred to as a "feministo."
 

ajoknoblauch

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Hey, it takes two to tango.
My other half is Argentine and when she walks down the street she attracts all sorts of comments....morocha, quiero morir para vos etc etc.
I asked her about this and whether she ever felt offended. She doesn't and takes it as a compliment.

Piropos can be complimentary and even creative, but they are more often crude and offensive.
 

Montauk_Project

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I´m talking about the difference between the "feel" and the numbers.
Does Argentina have more women in power than in the developed world (minus Sweeden)?
Does Argentina have more female directors than Hollywood?
Does Argentina have more women studying hard sciences and medicine than in the developed world?
Does Argetina have more CEOs that are women than the developed world?

BTW, I used to get a lot of catcalls. 90% were from men over 50, so I think the younger generation has changed. They began to stop when I got older and started wearing ugly clothes. I haven´t heard one in about 4 years. And if you want catcalls to stop, it is quite easy. Women don´t want them to stop.

you are right about the ads, but while they aren´t common in other countries I think it is easier to get a job if you are hot and young in NY. (and the under 30 thing is more about them wanting to pay little).

I´m not saying it is perfect, but I got more catcalls in New York City than in Buenos AIres. When I started my film career in the US I got a long list of jobs I would never get because I was a woman. I have heard a lot of very sexist things in Argentina, but in the reality, the only limit on women here is their own fear.
 
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