Flying With A Large Dog

BoxerArg

Registered
I will be leaving Argentina for the U.S. in a month with my husband and dog. My dog is a boxer and weighs around 60 pounds. He will be flying as cargo through United. We were informed by United that they only ship pets through cargo companies and they recommended using DAF cargo. The only problem is that we are having trouble finding a kennel that is big enough for him. Today the 500 size kennel arrived from DAF and while he fits in it and can turn around easily based on the width and length, his head does touch the roof of the kennel while sitting. According to the website, the kennel is technically too small for him based on his hieght. The airline website says he need a couple of inches betweeen his head and the roof of the kennel while sitting. I have been informed by the cargo company and multiple vets that the 500 is the largest size available. Also, in his connecting flight from Houston to Atlanta, United told me that the 500 is the largest size kennel allowed on the plane.

How strict are the airlines in Ezeiza with this? Are larger kennels even available? Has anyone moved with a large animal? Suggestions? Getting a large, short-nosed dog out of here has so far been really complicated and expensive. At this point, I don't care so much about the price, I just want to be able to move with my dog. Thank you!
 

Girino

Registered
I have seen dog crates with various dogs at the Montevideo Airport (a family leaving with 4-5 dogs!), and so you can fly them out from BsAs, as well. The larger carriers are quite expensive, though, and you can get an idea by searching "jaula transportadora perro" or also "dog kennel". You will find results as these:

http://articulo.mercadolibre.com.ar/MLA-572612921-jaula-transportadora-kennel-k400-90x70x60-_JM
http://articulo.mercadolibre.com.ar/MLA-575450247-transportadora-pet-suite-19-en-oferta-_JM (this one is small, they have also a XXL model) I have this in a medium size and it is very sturdy!

The only issue I see her is being your furry friends short nosed. Some airlines don't accept animals with short noses due to breathing issue they have and that increases their chance of death. I think this is limited to certain breeds and you should check this directly with your airline.
Some airlines don't accept pets at all, and there might be restriction due to external temperature in your departure and arrival airport. A lot of variables!

Also, be sure to have your dog chipped with the US chip - I understand this is a requirement to ID the pet at the US border, besides the various shots. (It is not a requirement to leave Argentina, so you should check the US requirement to enter, as well)
 

Fangar

Registered
Thursday night on the non-stop flight to BA from Atlanta a couple dragged their dog, lying on a blanket, down the aisle toward the back of the economy class. It was a big ass dog, looked something like a mastiff. I know it was bigger than your 60 pound boxer. What up with that?
 

mmoon

Active Member
Yeah, that does sound complicated. I'm actually amazed they will fly your boxer, because I thought the short nosed dogs had too many breathing issues and it was too much of a liability.
We have flown our 60 pound dog internationally four times for moves, using Delta, LAN and American. LAN was seemingly the most disorganized but ended up being the best. We also had to buy the extra large carrier (we have since sold it, but I'm sure it's the same size as yours) and there is no way to fudge the airlines with a larger size. We learned that those big carriers only fit into certain planes because of the cargo passages. If it's bigger than you tell them it will be, they physically cannot get it on the plane. I'm sure our dog would have touched the roof sitting, but I never heard that requirement...only that she could stand and turn without touching, which she could. Never had any problem there. But, every time, the airlines freaked out when we arrived with that huge carrier and said it was too big, so make sure you buy a legal size airline crate and then call the airline and give them the exact measurements of the carrier and make sure they put it in their records and get your hands on a copy or call back and confirm they have it. Also, weigh your dog in the carrier and give them the total weight. You only get a certain number of "points" for height and weight and it depends on the airline equipment they are using whether they will accept the dog. Call and confirm yet again before your flight in case they change equipment on you (once, we dropped from a 747 to a 757) so you don't show up with any nasty surprises. Make sure you know the heat requirements because they don't make exceptions there. Honestly, it was the most stressful part of our moves, but in all four flights, everything turned out okay.
Suerte!!
 

cwo4uscgret

Registered
Um gee here is a thought....buy your dog a seat and document it as a "service" dog. What's that? You have equilibrium issues and the dog helps you to balance...you have PTSD and the dog is your ticket to remaining calm? Use a laser color printer and dummy up an ID for Rover. I've never done it but I've heard from fellow customs officers working at airports....that it's been done.

Only posted for the entertainment value...
 

jeff1234

Active Member
I flew my 80 boxer to BsAs 3 years ago. Sorry I'm not able to lend you my crate.
At that time Continental had an excellent program. They even walked him in Houston during a stop over.
At that time there were runway temperature limits for dogs and for short nosed dogs. I think 75F was the limit for him.
If you haven't already heard this, here are a few tips: make sure he's comfortable with the crate before shipping him. My dog had never been in a crate so I had to start by going inside first and then taking naps with him inside so that he had no stress when he travelled in the crate.
Drill lots of big holes in the back of the crate to increase the air flow. Don't give him any sedatives or meds that will affect his metabolism. Start the trip with some ice in his water bowl.
My dog arrived in excellent condition. But he was held by the bureaucracy at EZE for a couple of hours while my wife ran around showing documents and making payments. During this time he was not given water and, even though he saw his family he was restrained, giving him stress after a 16 flight.
The only effect of the trip seemed to be his drinking about a gallon of water in the parking lot at EZE.
I wish you and your boxer the best trip.
 

BoxerArg

Registered
Yeah, that does sound complicated. I'm actually amazed they will fly your boxer, because I thought the short nosed dogs had too many breathing issues and it was too much of a liability.
We have flown our 60 pound dog internationally four times for moves, using Delta, LAN and American. LAN was seemingly the most disorganized but ended up being the best. We also had to buy the extra large carrier (we have since sold it, but I'm sure it's the same size as yours) and there is no way to fudge the airlines with a larger size. We learned that those big carriers only fit into certain planes because of the cargo passages. If it's bigger than you tell them it will be, they physically cannot get it on the plane. I'm sure our dog would have touched the roof sitting, but I never heard that requirement...only that she could stand and turn without touching, which she could. Never had any problem there. But, every time, the airlines freaked out when we arrived with that huge carrier and said it was too big, so make sure you buy a legal size airline crate and then call the airline and give them the exact measurements of the carrier and make sure they put it in their records and get your hands on a copy or call back and confirm they have it. Also, weigh your dog in the carrier and give them the total weight. You only get a certain number of "points" for height and weight and it depends on the airline equipment they are using whether they will accept the dog. Call and confirm yet again before your flight in case they change equipment on you (once, we dropped from a 747 to a 757) so you don't show up with any nasty surprises. Make sure you know the heat requirements because they don't make exceptions there. Honestly, it was the most stressful part of our moves, but in all four flights, everything turned out okay.
Suerte!!
United was actually the online airline that would let him fly. LAN no longer transports short-nosed dogs. I have called and checked with United about the two flights he will be on and luckily, both planes accept the large kennels. It is turning into the most stressful part of our move as well! Thanks!
 

BoxerArg

Registered
I flew my 80 boxer to BsAs 3 years ago. Sorry I'm not able to lend you my crate.
At that time Continental had an excellent program. They even walked him in Houston during a stop over.
At that time there were runway temperature limits for dogs and for short nosed dogs. I think 75F was the limit for him.
If you haven't already heard this, here are a few tips: make sure he's comfortable with the crate before shipping him. My dog had never been in a crate so I had to start by going inside first and then taking naps with him inside so that he had no stress when he travelled in the crate.
Drill lots of big holes in the back of the crate to increase the air flow. Don't give him any sedatives or meds that will affect his metabolism. Start the trip with some ice in his water bowl.
My dog arrived in excellent condition. But he was held by the bureaucracy at EZE for a couple of hours while my wife ran around showing documents and making payments. During this time he was not given water and, even though he saw his family he was restrained, giving him stress after a 16 flight.
The only effect of the trip seemed to be his drinking about a gallon of water in the parking lot at EZE.
I wish you and your boxer the best trip.
Thanks so much for the tips! Getting in the crate with him has been very helpful! Hopefully since Continental and United have merged, the United program is still excellent.
 

BoxerArg

Registered
Thursday night on the non-stop flight to BA from Atlanta a couple dragged their dog, lying on a blanket, down the aisle toward the back of the economy class. It was a big ass dog, looked something like a mastiff. I know it was bigger than your 60 pound boxer. What up with that?
Um gee here is a thought....buy your dog a seat and document it as a "service" dog. What's that? You have equilibrium issues and the dog helps you to balance...you have PTSD and the dog is your ticket to remaining calm? Use a laser color printer and dummy up an ID for Rover. I've never done it but I've heard from fellow customs officers working at airports....that it's been done.

Only posted for the entertainment value...
I cannot believe they brought a dog of that size on the plane! I read about getting him certified as an emotional service dog. It really would be so much easier but there is no way he could handle it. He gets way too excited around other people!
 

mmoon

Active Member
A few more things that helped us...we found a spill proof water bowl (really works) that we could Velcro to the bottom of the crate. We only had that, a sleeping pad and a used shirt from our child in there with her. The first time we put in some food, but she didn't seem to eat any of it and we had some customs issues with the food!
Also, assuming you will be bringing the dog back to your home of origin in the crate, leave all of the airline stickers and forms attached to it. On our fourth and final trip back home, it was the key to getting that crate onto the plane. Truly, it looked so massive that the agents were sure they wouldn't accept it. But, the fact that we had all of the original tags and stickers from flight number three still attached to the crate (thankfully, the same airline) nullified that argument. It's easier to deal with those obstacles in your home country of origin rather than in your adopted country.
Regarding the temperature issue, they now estimate it based on cabin (not just outside) temperature, assuming the dog will be in cargo for an hour or so at your origin point, longer at any stopovers, and arrival location.
Side note, on a recent flight home from Europe, there was a woman in economy class (young and seemingly able bodied), who had a standard poodle traveling in the cabin with her. The emotional support dog reigns supreme. I definitely would have flown with far greater ease of mind if I didn't have to worry about my dog every time we hit a patch of turbulence.
 
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