Getting back into Argentina if I leave for short time

esllou

Registered
I've been over to colonia for the visa-renewal fun and games twice now. I believe that, technically, once I've been here 180 days, I'm supposed to leave, but it's something that's not really enforced.

I plan on heading back to europe in sept/oct, possibly just for a week or so. Is there a danger on re-entering argentina that the immigration at the airport are likely to be a lot more "on the ball" than those working at the ports? Could I be refused entry and does anyone have experience of doing such a thing with a quick trip to europe/US?
 

BlahBlah

Registered
There is always a risk that you will be deported or denied entry. I think the risk is not that big but you are breaking the law

If you are not over 90 days there is no risk if you leave for Europe
 

John.St

Registered
esllou said:
I've been over to colonia for the visa-renewal fun and games twice now. I believe that, technically, once I've been here 180 days, I'm supposed to leave, but it's something that's not really enforced.

I plan on heading back to europe in sept/oct, possibly just for a week or so. Is there a danger on re-entering argentina that the immigration at the airport are likely to be a lot more "on the ball" than those working at the ports? Could I be refused entry and does anyone have experience of doing such a thing with a quick trip to europe/US?
You could be refused - and pigs could fly - but never heard about an incidence of either.

Many expats on tourist visa pop across to Colónia or Montevideo on a one-day trip with BuqueBus year after year and AFAIK at most hear a few grunts, when they are allowed back.

A trip to Europe should be even safer, I mean it's genuinely abroad, while Uruguay is considered more or less some sort of Argentinian province.

If you do get deported or refused entry, please let us know - it will probably get an entry in Guiness' record book.
 

John.St

Registered
BlahBlah said:
Try get yourself arrested or stopped by the police with an expired visa
Read esllou's mail again, it is about re-entering Argentina and obtaining a brand new tourist visa after a trip to Europe.
 

davonz

Registered
I went over to colonia 3 times to get the visa renewed then got stick of the whole process. An america friend told me not to worry and just pay the 50 peso fine at the airport when i leave. He had done that 3 times before they said anything to him, and he was staying here for a year or more at a time, so not just overstaying for a couple of days or months. Anyways i paid my 50 pesos and had no problems coming back into the country 4 months later. I always have a return ticket (it usually works out cheaper than 1 way anyways) but never been asked to see it or anything.
The 50 peso fine was last year, so maybe more now.
I now have the retirement visa thing. Which cost me NZ$124 (US$80), which has solved that problem for me.
 

steveinbsas

Registered
davonz said:
I went over to colonia 3 times to get the visa renewed then got stick of the whole process. An america friend told me not to worry and just pay the 50 peso fine at the airport when i leave. He had done that 3 times before they said anything to him, and he was staying here for a year or more at a time, so not just overstaying for a couple of days or months. Anyways i paid my 50 pesos and had no problems coming back into the country 4 months later. I always have a return ticket (it usually works out cheaper than 1 way anyways) but never been asked to see it or anything.
The 50 peso fine was last year, so maybe more now.
I now have the retirement visa thing. Which cost me NZ$124 (US$80), which has solved that problem for me.

The fine for the tourist visa overstay is now $300 pesos and the annual renewal fee for your "retirement" visa is now $600 pesos (US$150+/-). I recently made a police report and only showed a photocopy of my passport. I was asked how long I had been living in Argentina (three years), but not about my status with migraciones. The photocopy of my passport included the page with the latest entry stamp, but the officer taking the report never unfolded the paper so I know he did not see it...or care.

Back to the OP: I've never heard of (or read about) anyone being denied entry to Argentina, no matter how many times they had previously overstayed their tourist visa or if they had made multiple day trips to Colonia in order to renew.
 

esllou

Registered
I suppose (and being uber cynical here) that even if I did have a few problems coming back, I could always take out a few hundred peso notes and say "so can i pay someone for the re-entry visa?" and I'm guessing my problems would disappear pretty quickly.
:)
 

John.St

Registered
davonz said:
... An america friend told me not to worry and just pay the 50 peso fine at the airport when i leave. He had done that 3 times before they said anything to him, and he was staying here for a year or more at a time, so not just overstaying for a couple of days or months. Anyways i paid my 50 pesos and had no problems coming back into the country 4 months later.
steveinbsas said:
The fine for the tourist visa overstay is now $300 pesos and the annual renewal fee for your "retirement" visa is now $600 pesos (US$150+/-).
IMO we shall be very careful about giving this sort of advice or hinting at such behavior.

Even with the higher fine (AR$ 300) we are talking of breaking the law to save 82 centavos a day + 4 BuqueBus tickets a year, or - as in my case - the bus ride or airplane Chile ida y vuelta.

The enforcement of the 180 days rule is very slack today - to say the least.
If I should venture a guess, this has to do with the foreign currency expats are bringing into a very strained economy.

There is a risk, however, that one cloudy day an election seats a Chavez-type president and then it may not be the best of policies when you re-enter for the umpteenth time, to have broken one or more laws time and again by overstaying.

I very strongly advice to not save a 1 or 2 pesos a day while taking the risk of being denied re-entry if things change, also never break the laws of your adopted Vaterland added: - unless you have a very good reason :D

Analyze what it will cost you, if one day you are refused re-entry either for good or for e.g. three years .
 

BlahBlah

Registered
esllou said:
I suppose (and being uber cynical here) that even if I did have a few problems coming back, I could always take out a few hundred peso notes and say "so can i pay someone for the re-entry visa?" and I'm guessing my problems would disappear pretty quickly.
:)
Or you will be taken to the office and they ask you for a lot of cash. Just ask to someone what can happen if you bring electronics into the country
 
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