Got shouted at on first border hop at the Buquebus terminal in BA

Bajo_cero2

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I was advising for 12 years against visa runs here while there was only one person here who asserted it was 100% safe to do the visa runs. Today that person is not taking any responsibility.

I suggest you apply for legal residency or citizenship.

You do not need to marry for papers in this country.
 

americas

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I claim no expertise in this, however I have followed the matter reaonably closely here. I have a clear recollection of Bajo clarifying it very clearly in the last 12 to 18 months, as follows:

The infraction is (or was at the time he wrote) translatable as "abuse of the tourist visa" and I recall him saying something about it being interpretable as "espionage".

My memory is clearer about the penalty: should a border official detect this and use his or her discretion (which probably almost happened in your case), the penalty is/was: banned from entering for 5 years, a stamp placed on the passport indicating this ban (presumably the system also updated to show this). Bajo's advice was to take out a habeus corpus immediately.
Thank you very much for this answer! Good to know!!!

Re: table height - great point!

@BeraRane jajajaja

@reply-guy thanks for the info. Good to know, thanks for the answer

@jbeast176 - thanks for the advice! Generally, I believed that those clear answers didn't exist and am not expecting clear answers. What I was surprised by in this thread is that people seemed to claim that actually the clear answers do exist and they are really grim & unfavorable -- there seems to be so much evidence to the contrary of that, although there is also evidence of really bad outcomes so the risks do exist. And that's really interesting about the weekend workers, this happened on a weekend.
 

dsp27

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Thank you very much for this answer! Good to know!!!

Re: table height - great point!

@BeraRane jajajaja

@reply-guy thanks for the info. Good to know, thanks for the answer

@jbeast176 - thanks for the advice! Generally, I believed that those clear answers didn't exist and am not expecting clear answers. What I was surprised by in this thread is that people seemed to claim that actually the clear answers do exist and they are really grim & unfavorable -- there seems to be so much evidence to the contrary of that, although there is also evidence of really bad outcomes so the risks do exist. And that's really interesting about the weekend workers, this happened on a weekend.
First visa run is safe if you leave before before you run out of 90 days. They cannot refuse you re-entre for the remaining days. If you wait till day 90 and come back same or next day you become a target. 2nd 3rd etc runs always hold some risk....common sense.
 

Cordoba

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"it isn't pretty for you or your employer".... what does that mean?
If you are a tax resident which isnt hard to become with any visa then a foreign company cannot employ you to work here remotely directly anymore. They need to establish a domestic entity. So most employers wouldn't want to unknowingly be put in a situation of violating those requirements in a country they may no have presence in otherwise.

I have only saw enforcement by savvy employers rather than AFIP so if your company doesn't know or care.

Or if you are an independent contractor I think any noncompliance would just be on you instead of dragging the person paying you into the mix.

Whether it is pesifying the income or double taxation, I think compliance may not even possible when you put all your cards on the table.
 

ventanilla

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You can be denied entry at any time for any reason. That it's legal to re-enter doesn't mean you'll be allowed to.

It is legal to overstay. This is different.

You should attempt to get a legal migration status to ensure this doesn't happen again, if you plan to stay for longer. That or stay in the country for long enough to get citizenship (though this can require 2-3 years without leaving)
 

ventanilla

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Here, taken from the official BA page for digital nomads:


Given the context that these statements are on the "Digital Nomads" page, and that the "Visas" section says that a visa isn't required for stays that do not exceed 90 days -- it seems very clear that they're okay with digital nomads being here without a visa.

Of course, I also see the other sections emphasizing how important visas are... but, it's compelling to me that the Digital Nomad page dedicates an entire section to saying that visas aren't required for digital nomads on short stays. I recognize that I'm pushing it because it's been 2x 90 days, which is why I'm changing at this point!

There is a separate PDF resource on that page, that is called "Guide to services for digital nomads". It has a Visas section which literally makes no mention of visas other than, essentially, "visitors from most countries don't need a Visa if they're here for less than 90 days".

----

Copy and pasted + screenshot, below

Visas and Procedures​


Working remotely from Buenos Aires is a unique experience but it can involve a few tedious procedures! Therefore, it is very important you are well aware of all you need to do before arrival, and once you get here.

Visa procedures are obviously the most important. Take a good look at visa requirements and complete the step by step instructions. Information on visas will be updated in the coming days.

Visas​


Visitors from the vast majority of countries do not require a visa for stays that do not exceed 90 days (citizens of Mercosur countries do not need their passport, they only need their identity document). Check your situation at the National Migration Office

Embassies and consulates​


It is worth consulting immigration requirements with the Argentine embassy or consulate of your country of origin. You can also consult foreign embassies and consulates in Argentina.

View attachment 8252

This is the BA government, they have nothing to do with migration. They're basically just giving people advice, not actually stating anything to do with federal migration policy
 

Bajo_cero2

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You can be denied entry at any time for any reason. That it's legal to re-enter doesn't mean you'll be allowed to.

It is legal to overstay. This is different.

You should attempt to get a legal migration status to ensure this doesn't happen again, if you plan to stay for longer. That or stay in the country for long enough to get citizenship (though this can require 2-3 years without leaving)
It is not correct that the stay must be uninterrupted. You must be here no less than 7 months per year to be considered a resident for citizenship.
 
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