Grit and seediness at arm's length?

dsc

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Where can one go in BsAs to see some gritty/seedy things but not put oneself in harm's way? ie.) perhaps riding on a bus or on a train?

I've done this a little bit in other Latin American cities like Montevideo and Panama City.

I'm talking purely in the daytime. Back at home even before dusk.


I'm not sure why, but I've always had this morbid fascination.

I guess it's the same kind of thing that makes one look when you drive by the scene of an accident..
 

tangobob

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Take the train to Pilar (in the day time) you will pass through some really seedy slums and squats, and you will be safe as there is an armed guard on the train, won't stop you being pestered by beggers though.
 
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dsc

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Sounds like the perfect thing, tangobob.

I've taken the train from Belgrano station to Tigre with a local friend, so it should be somewhat similar. Beggers on that line too.

Thx
 

EliA

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Am I really the only one horrified not only by this idea, but by the fact that people are taking it seriously and giving real advice on how to go about doing it?

If what distinguishes me from being a 'traveler' is that I don't go out of my way to gawk at the less fortunate like they were animals in a zoo, well, call me a tourist any day.
 

Ailujjj

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There's a world of difference between seeing poverty and gawking at animals.

It may not be for everyone, but at least consider that for some people, getting a first-hand look at what so many people live is something that builds and enables their compassion for others. Sometimes it's important to step out of the bubble - even if on a train - and see what reality is for so many. Makes it a lot easier to put your problems in perspective, appreciate all that you have, and develop your ability view the world with a different perspective. Maybe even inspire you to take action in some form.

I don't see what's horrific about that.
 

arty

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EliA said:
Am I really the only one horrified not only by this idea, but by the fact that people are taking it seriously and giving real advice on how to go about doing it?

If what distinguishes me from being a 'traveler' is that I don't go out of my way to gawk at the less fortunate like they were animals in a zoo, well, call me a tourist any day.
A traveler should be able to see everything a place has to offer- the good and the bad.

Now, if he exploits it for personal gain, that's a whole different story.
 
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