Have you accustomed to Argentine Life?

MatiArg

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Hey expats!

Just wondering if you consciously or unconsciously have picked up argentine customs while living in Argentina and realize it when you go visit your home country. For example, one expat that went back to visit her parents mentioned that when she went to the food court in the US she could not believe how long the line at Dunkin Donuts and the amount of consumption that was going on at that place! I imagine that when she was living there she was not even aware of that observation... Im currently in the US but am from Argentina and every time my father visits he's amazed by how much inventory US car dealers, stores etc carry. My parents also think im crazy because i have eggs for breakfast! I would like to hear what your experiences have been like. Share!
 

Napoleon

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Have you grown accustomed to...?

Have you acclimated to...?

Have you become a porteño/a? (Or an Argentine?)

Short answer:

YES

The long answer will have to come after I've had more sleep. Pero che, medialunas will never hold a candle to real croissants.
 

KatharineAnn

Registered
Yeah I definitely picked up the complaining bit.

And the facturas and mate.

More deep things, probably, but it would require some serious reflection to figure out.
 

citygirl

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Yes, in many ways.

Like your father, I'm constantly amazed when I go back to the US at how much inventory there is in the supermarkets, stores, etc. There is just so much STUFF!

I'm surprised by the portion sizes. Everything is bigger there.

I'm pleasantly surprised/reminded how easy life is there - pay all your bills online, a trip to the bank takes 20 minutes vs 2 hours, ATMs always work, everything can be done online, etc.

I probably complain a bit more since I moved here ;)

I frequently gasp at the prices in NYC when I'm there.

I don't drink coffee anymore - my mate comes everywhere with me.

On a personal level, I'm probably a bit less PC or less reserved about sharing my feelings these days. Here, it seems nothing is taboo. So sometimes I think I shock my friends in the US with how open I've become about saying how I feel.
 

wineguy999

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My (Argentine) wife and I were at a restaurant in Houston last night, and we never cease to marvel at the amount of food people here shamelessly consume when it's obvious their time would be better spent on a treadmill. Looking around you in Houston (number 6 of America's fattest cities) is surreal when you're accustomed to spending time in BsAs.

And then there's the ultra-casual clothing issue...
 
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Davidglen77

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For me it's been a mixed bag. I definitely have picked up some fun habits, like when I want to emphasize something I do that italian (or argentine) gesture where you bunch your fingers together and move your hand back and forth. However what I certainly have had to adjust to is learning to live without planning for the long-term. Since everything changes SO frequently here.......rules, laws, prices, etc. I no longer plan far in advance for ANYTHING. I cap off planning for 1 to 2 months in advance as opposed to "next year" or "within 2 years I want to......." When I lived in the US I found it much easier to plan for the long term as life in general is much more stable. For some crazy reason I still love being here, go figure.
 

Kyra

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citygirl said:
Yes, in many ways.

Like your father, I'm constantly amazed when I go back to the US at how much inventory there is in the supermarkets, stores, etc. There is just so much STUFF!

I'm surprised by the portion sizes. Everything is bigger there.
Oh lord, then I'm probably going to have a fit when I visit the US. Because I think portions here are HUGE, and I feel that there's so much stuff in the supermercados. I mean, 20 different kinds of mayo?

It's weird how everything is so different from country to country, but still feels so similar..
 

EliA

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I LOVE kissing on the cheek as a way of saying hello and goodbye. I have always loathed shaking hands and it's probably the hardest thing for me to adjust to when I go back.

I have also picked up the 'sho' accent, use 'che' more than any other word, and have incorporated many other typically Argentinean phrases into my grab bag of Spanish.

I'm sure there are a million other things but those are the two that stand out. Oh, other than fearing for my life every time I get in a car here...
 
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