Hello From A Wannabe Expat

diegoro

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Hi, I'm Diego, and although I'm born and raised here in Argentina, I would like to be part of this Forum.
I'm 45 years old, married, father of 2 kids.
First of all, I apologize for my english, and then I'd like to thank you all in advance to allow me to read and write in here, not being an expat at all.
I can't even remember how I reach this site a few days ago, but I can tell you that I've enjoyed a lot reading other's points of view of my country, my society and my culture.
So I thought I'll better register and sign in.

So far, among other things, I've learnt that our Pizza, Medialunas and Alfajores may be not the best in the world. So I think I'm gonna need to travel a lot more to know if that true.
At least the quality of the "bife de chorizo" and icecream seems not to be in discussion. :)

I think I understand how hard it could be to live in another country and even more when the reason is not love.
Anyway, I think I'll happily live abroad if I the conditions are met.

Any Thoughts, of this nonsense ?
Diego.
 

Girino

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Welcome Diego!

Are you feeling an expat in your own country? I used to and I used also to hang around an Expat forum to read what the other people found so interesting in my country. You will read a lot of complaining, but nobody takes time to write about the pros, however we surely find some if we live here!
 

Redbeanz

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Diego, I think that my words might reflect the views of some others on the forum. We very much appreciate and respect the people of Argentina, and we also admire the beauty and the abundant natural resources. As a large group, we differ greatly in our opinions of the government of your country, just as we differ greatly in our opinions of the governments of our own countries (just read this forum one year from now, to see the arguments about the U.S. Elections, for example).

It will be very interesting to read your opinions, and I hope that you become a very active member of this forum. No need to apologize for your English! You will soon see how bad our English and our Spanish are.
 

diegoro

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Serafina, RedBeanz. Thank very much for your kind and wise words.

I always thought that there is more to learn from the people that thinks differently than me, than the other way around.
In this case I'd would add, that there is much more to learn from people from other cultures, other countries.
People that have travel, know lots of places, met many different people.

A recent phenomena in my country it's that I feel that I can't have a peaceful, non-aggressive discussion about politics with other countrymen.
People against or in favor of this government gets angry easily.
So I try to avoid any kind of politics opinion in the cab, in a queue, in dinner (even with family). And that's really sad.
Hope the time changes (for the best) and everybody can agree to disagree.
 

Ceviche

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A recent phenomena in my country it's that I fell people against or in favor of this government gets angry easily.
So I try to avoid any kind of politics opinion in the cab,

Very true. Today, I was chatting with a cab driver. I told him I supported Macri. And he was extremely angry with me. His eyes became red and he started frothing from his mouth, and he growled and barked at me like a mad/crazy dog. ** shudder**
 

EJLarson

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Most of the drivers expressing opinions to me seem completely disgusted with the whole system and all politicians. I usually try not to take sides and just ask something like "what do you think will happen in October" and usually don't have to say anything else for the rest of the ride (even to Ezeiza). I think it would be pretty hard for someone who works as hard as a cabbie to be a hard-core populist - guess you found one, though.
 

Dada

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That's the beauty of being a foreigner, you get away with many things, unforgivable in a local B) Even hard-core excentrism, such as respecting and appreciating both Cristina and Macri, not being able to choose between Boca and River, not being into asado etc.
 

RodalfoWalsh

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In capital at least I've found taxi drivers to be representative of the population as a whole, which is to say, overwhelmingly in favor of macri.


Back to the point though. There is always a negative bias to these forums since people generally don't post about the things they find acceptable but I've been here over 6 years now and I'm probably more content with the country than most Argentines.

That said....... your pizza sucks, your medialunas suck, your alfajores suck and if you want, you can come to my house on sunday and I'll teach you how to cook a bife de chorizo.

I do have to give you the ice cream... ;)
 

Ceviche

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When I was a kid, I was taught by the elders in the family, never to discuss religion or politics with anyone other than immediate family members. That lesson has served me very well for most of my life.

At times, when I have ignored that lesson, I have always regretted it.
 
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