how do other spanish speaking countries perceive argentine spanish?

ckjb

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i think it sounds really pretty compared to say, spanish spoken in spain. but i'm not originally from a spanish speaking country and can't speak spanish very well. thoughts?
 

Davidglen77

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Argentine spanish certainly runs the gamut from "pretty sounding" to outright strange sounding depending on the person who is speaking it and where they are from within Argentina. I would say your average porteño speaks fairly well in terms of vocabulary but if you have been to other spanish speaking countries or have lived in a US city with a large spanish-speaking populace, you would find it bizarre sounding to say the least.
 

MatiArg

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I have watched Argentine movies in castellano dubbed in Espanol neutro! Neutral spanish is used for cartoons, shows and movies made in US and elsewhere. Sounds a little bit mexican. I remember a couple years algo kids in argentina would ask their mom for xmas toys and they would use the terms they heard on cartoons. For example " quiero un balon" (ball, pelota). Parents were like WTF is that?? Interesting i must say....
 

dsc

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I've asked my Guatemalan co-worker this (I'm not in BA, up in Canada).

He says Argentine Spanish is understandable, it's just a bit funky with the 'zh' for the double LL's.

Really it's quite comparable for someone like me listening to someone speaking English with a thick Scottish or English accent. You really have to listen & of course, there are some words they use that we don't (and vice versa).
 

RWS

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I like the sound of Argentine -- well, porteño -- Spanish, with the "zh" redolent of Andalusia and the still slightly exotic (less and less so, as more and more present-day Moslems come to the West) epoch of the Moslem occupation of Spain. Even without that, though, Spanish of educated speakers from throughout la república sounds sweeter to my ears than the loose-and-lazy Puerto Rican or machine-gun Mexican more often heard here in the northeastern United States.
 

syngirl

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The Spaniards don't look on it as badly as the French do the Quebecois accent, but they do seem to think it sounds provincial -- haha, that coming from a people that lisp their way through life!

However, you should bear in mind that Porteno Spanish is not the same as Argentine Spanish -- the accent changes quite a bit and in many regions there's no zh-zhing for the double Ls -- and there's more use of usted in a lot of regions, whereas you barely even hear it in C.F. these days. When you're from Capital, everyone knows it as soon as they open their mouth -- and they get the same kind of looks a New Yorker might get when he's out in the heart of rural Texas "Y'all ain't from around here, are ya?"

The Santiago del Estero accent is quite lilting compared to the Porteno accent, and they speak much slower. The Cordobese is much more neutral, and again, much slower. If you're looking for a place to learn Spanish, Buenos Aires isn't necessarily the ideal, as it has some many of it's own things going on. However, you'll get so used to the speed with which they speak that you shouldn't have too many problems understanding when you travel abroad -- you just have to pay more attention to the y's and ll's then you've been accustomed to. Mendocinos as far as I remember don't use the zh at all, it's been a long time since I talked to one so can't quite recall.
 

syngirl

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RWS said:
the loose-and-lazy Puerto Rican or machine-gun Mexican more often heard here in the northeastern United States.
lol -- to me Mexicans always sound like they've been smoking weed -- the Puertoriquenos have been smoking twice that plus laying around in the sun and humidity and can just barely care to put any effort into the words coming out of their mouths!
 

BA_local

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Hey Guys, here's an advice from a Local that speaks both English and Spanish fluently. If you are here in BA learning spanish, do not pick up the "sh" noises, like "Yo", instead say "io", because we Argentinians are the only ones that talk like that. A perfect example would be the word "Pollo" (chicken), but we say it like this: "Posho".

Well, hope that helped. I'm glad to be here, love to help newcomers here in my City :)

See ya,

Mariano.
 

aidahdz

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syngirl said:
lol -- to me Mexicans always sound like they've been smoking weed -- the Puertoriquenos have been smoking twice that plus laying around in the sun and humidity and can just barely care to put any effort into the words coming out of their mouths!
As a Spanish speaking Puerto Rican woman in Buenos Aires, it was surprising for me at first the differences in Spanish and Castellano. Although, I am understood clearly, and have been incorporating the 'll's, I am in agreement with syngirl that the Castellano spoken here in Buenos Aires is slightly different than the Castellano spoken in other parts of Argentina. I have Argentine friends and family who are mostly from other regions and they speak slightly different than Portenos. However, this is the case for all of Latin American countries, as language is fluid, flexible, and influenced greatly from people and contact with other languages, therefore ever changing and dynamic. Accents vary from country and region, and I can only speak for myself and the Spanish I speak, which is at a slower pace and does not include the 'che' or 'sh' or even the 'voz' form, and neither does the Spanish spoken in the Mexican community I lived in the Northeastern US. Perhaps syngirl, like you suggest, it's because of all of da weed we smoke, or the tropical Caribbean heat has somehow damaged our capacity to speak faster ( I'm using the 'da' form here, since I am from the Northeast and we are speaking in generalizations, right?). So there is a correlation between humidity and the 'voz' form? And all this time I thought the differences in how Latinos speak Spanish, from our accents to what second person pronouns we use, was due to cultural and historic factors, immigration and the influence of other ethnic communities. Now enough, I can't believe I 'barely cared' to write this, I gotta go lay around in the sun and smoke twice as much as the Mexicans, whatever that means.
 
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