How long before Starbucks kills off the classic Argentinian cafe?

Fiscal

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There's a Starbucks on virtually every street corner, and the usually seem pretty damn crowded, despite being expensive (by Argentinian standards).
 

Stantucker

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There are lots of hip, trendy Argentine chain cafes that are also always full. But you may be right that Starbucks and their Argentine equivalents will be the death of many, but not all by any means, traditional Argentine cafes-- places that never innovated. Of course, some will argue that MM is responsible for those closures, even though this sort of thing happens, and is happening as we speak, all over the world.
 

Anna3313

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I don't know, I still see all the older cafes packed to the brim as well. Likely because they also serve full meals and have better prices for what you're getting. The newer swath of Argentine cafes are also incredible because they're paying attention to the coffee beans and how they prepare each order. I think there seems to be a spot in the market for all of them at the moment. I haven't seen the classic Argentine cafes losing that much business to Starbucks. For me, Starbucks is the least exciting of the lot. Mediocre coffee that costs too much and an environment that isn't that inviting to inhabit as well as highly processed tasting foodstuffs. Both the classic and newer independent cafes seem to be going strong. Mcdonalds didn't put anyone out of business but they're also always packed. If anything, they created independent burger joints that rival it, all around town. Also, have to take into consideration that a lot of expats and travelers patron Starbucks and similar chains because they're familiar and easy for someone who's just used to that brand back home and wants a quick fix of caffeine while cruising around the city.
 

Stantucker

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I don't know, I still see all the older cafes packed to the brim as well. Likely because they also serve full meals and have better prices for what you're getting. The newer swath of Argentine cafes are also incredible because they're paying attention to the coffee beans and how they prepare each order. I think there seems to be a spot in the market for all of them at the moment. I haven't seen the classic Argentine cafes losing that much business to Starbucks. For me, Starbucks is the least exciting of the lot. Mediocre coffee that costs too much and an environment that isn't that inviting to inhabit as well as highly processed tasting foodstuffs. Both the classic and newer independent cafes seem to be going strong. Mcdonalds didn't put anyone out of business but they're also always packed. If anything, they created independent burger joints that rival it, all around town. Also, have to take into consideration that a lot of expats and travelers patron Starbucks and similar chains because they're familiar and easy for someone who's just used to that brand back home and wants a quick fix of caffeine while cruising around the city.
You are right that a lot of older, more traditional cafes are doing well, but I think those are the ones that are in a good location, have a touch of charm, and have updated their menus or have well priced meals, as you suggest. Even a couple of traditional places near the Congreso (a good location) closed and were replaced by Argentine chains. I assume that's because they neither renovated nor innovated over the years.
 

MatameBA

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Lots of high school and college kids frequent Starbucks. Weak coffee and sugary drinks in paper cups is the new norm for an entire generation. So, I don't think the Starbucks expansion will slow down. That said, I've been coming to BA for ~12 years and there have never been as many gourmet coffee shops as there are now. The hipster boom definitely has its upsides.
 

Rich One

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Martinez, Bonafide and others will survive...! I will keep having the Cheesecake and Cappuccino served at a table in regular China Cups... Hahahahah
 

Daniel82

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It won’t ever happen. For one- Starbucks is very expensive in Argentina. I know it’s not cheap practically anywhere in the world but in comparison to salaries in Argentina, even most professionals here don’t do the US style daily Starbucks coffee run, but see it as an occasional treat.

I don’t see the little old folks sitting in Starbucks the way they do in typical cafes for hours either.
 
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