How to learn Spanish?

Rich One

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Perhaps the moviemethod.com can help you it`s based on sentence mining and movie watching to build your language base
Children don't learn languages with grammar rules or from books.
 

Greg S

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This is the best, easiest video explanation of por y para I have ever come across.

It's not perfect, but it will help you be correct in each use 90%+ of the time.

The Argentine economy would explode if--in one generation--the country committed to teaching everyone English. Keep Spanish, but become a completely bilingual country. The Chinese are certainly doing this. Then again, they want to take over the world. It's India's one great advantage as well.
 
The Argentine economy would explode if--in one generation--the country committed to teaching everyone English. Keep Spanish, but become a completely bilingual country. The Chinese are certainly doing this. Then again, they want to take over the world. It's India's one great advantage as well.
Won't work - The Chinese are very motivated.
 

Renzi

Registered
The Argentine economy would explode if--in one generation--the country committed to teaching everyone English. Keep Spanish, but become a completely bilingual country. The Chinese are certainly doing this. Then again, they want to take over the world. It's India's one great advantage as well.
There is little correlation between economic development and the English language. It's strange that you used India as an example, the entire Indian subcontinent remains one of the poorest regions on Earth even though English is one of the official languages. The only tangible benefit to being bilingual in India is that it comes in handy while begging and scamming tourists.

As for China, it's not their language skills that got them ahead, it's their reliance on slave labor and their theft of resources and intellectual property.
 
There is little correlation between economic development and the English language. It's strange that you used India as an example, the entire Indian subcontinent remains one of the poorest regions on Earth even though English is one of the official languages. The only tangible benefit to being bilingual in India is that it comes in handy while begging and scamming tourists.

As for China, it's not their language skills that got them ahead, it's their reliance on slave labor and their theft of resources and intellectual property.
Renzi - The voice of truth and reason!
 

Greg S

Registered
There is little correlation between economic development and the English language. It's strange that you used India as an example, the entire Indian subcontinent remains one of the poorest regions on Earth even though English is one of the official languages. The only tangible benefit to being bilingual in India is that it comes in handy while begging and scamming tourists.

As for China, it's not their language skills that got them ahead, it's their reliance on slave labor and their theft of resources and intellectual property.
 
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Renzi

Registered
"On a micro level, improved English skills allow individuals to apply for better jobs and raise their standards of living." No shit, Sherlock. It doesn't take a degree from HBS to point out that having legs makes it easier to walk.

The scatterplots provided in the article don't prove anything other than high-income countries also have greater English proficiency, but this isn't proof that their economies grew because they spoke more English. Again, I'll point out that India has actually been slipping in the HDI index, it's fallen to 131 as of last year, even lower than Iraq and Venezuela.
 

Iznogud

Registered
FWIW, I visited both China and India in the 80s. Chinese spoke their stuff and didn't have much chance of learning English or anything else. Look at them now.
The Indians spoke English. Look at them now, SSDD.

Iz
 
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