I own an apt here and I STILL don't have a garantia?!?!

Heather G

Registered
Long story short, I tried to rent in 2005 and found it was impossible. The easy option (which has also proved more economical in the long run) was to buy. Now I'm getting tired of the city and figured I'd just go somewhere else, rent out my place and use the money to rent a nice house with a yard and a bbq and enjoy small town life. And it should be pretty straightforward to set up now that I own a property in Capital, right? Wrong. Apparently you can not be your own garantor. Why? Because you might die. Thing is, if you die, you "vacate" their property and there shouldn't be an issue (?), or am I confused as to what the garantia is actually for?
 

mini

Registered
I would hope that one would get vacated should one die! :-O

I imagine though that any family that lives with you might stay? Could that be it? It does seem a bit strange.
 

Neil

Registered
We tried to do the same, with persistence :mad:we were able to convince an owner to rent to us, using our apto as a guarantee....:eek: It took lot's of convincing though..!!!
 

gouchobob

Registered
Another way around this is to offer say 6 months rent in advance to the owner. I was able to rent a house on this basis without a granatia. I'm sure many owners would be willing to rent to you on this basis.
 

Heather G

Registered
Yes, we did manage to work something out. It's just frustrating to have walked into to many real estate offices and confidently said that we have a garantia before going to look at as many more houses only to realize that we were up against the same wall as before. So we end up in the position of them doing us a favor by working out our complicated foreigner circumstances.....
 

billsfan

Registered
A third-party must be involved to be considered a regular "garantia".
Depending on some conditions (demand, offer, economic stability, etc) you may not be required to have a "garante" with a property of his own, he/she could just demonstrate enough income.

The key is NEGOTIATION and whatever the owner considers to be a valid "garantía" to cover for any damage his/her property could suffer.

The higher the demand, the more picky owners get, but there is no rule (at least in practice) on what to ask for.
These may be a list of what they tend to ask, from high demand to low:

* 2 garantes with 1 major property each
* 2 garantes, 1 with a property and the other may presentl his/her pay cheque
* 1 garante with a property
and so on...

During the worst economic periods (2001, 2002 for example) I could rent a place by just demonstrating my own income.
 

Alzinho

Registered
It's a joke isn't it?!

I found a place and got a 2 year contract paying a 6mth deposit and 6mths up front, but I've been looking for something similar for my ex for over a month now and still haven't got past an agent to even be able to put a proposal to an owner. It's made me realize just how lucky I was.

The short-sightedness of the agents is unfuckingbelievable. They even claim that they wouldn't recommend their clients accept an offer, even if the offer is to pay the entire 2 years up-front!

The issue is the fundamental lack of trust that Argentinians have of Argentinians. My landlord quite openly says that the only reason he accepted my offer is because I'm from a civilized country and he feels he can trust me. It's a pretty sad state of affairs when a people has such a low opinion of its own.
 

billsfan

Registered
No, it's not a joke.
I believe it comes from the time when people could occupy a place and not leave even if the contract expired and while not paying any rent. And because of laws to protect the "family home", it got difficult for owners to force people out.
And actually, I could not take side in such a conflict, because even when private owners are not responsible for the well being of needing people (say the parents were laid off and they don't have any other place to go), the goverment is never that quick to reach for a solution.

OK, enough with history... paying up front is usually good to cover for any house damages and being an expat will obviously NOT make you a risky business. It's not like you are here to squat or anything.

Again, it's not a joke and it all comes to negotiation. If you don't like it, look for a more reasonable owner.
 

French jurist

Registered
Never had a garantia, I found my homes by speaking to many people, being opened/courteous/educated.
The house I am renting now was even proposed to me by the owner.

Being from the 1st world indeed helps a lot since we are considered as being more reliable than Argies.
 

Alzinho

Registered
billsfan said:
No, it's not a joke.
I believe it comes from the time when people could occupy a place and not leave even if the contract expired and while not paying any rent. And because of laws to protect the "family home", it got difficult for owners to force people out.
And actually, I could not take side in such a conflict, because even when private owners are not responsible for the well being of needing people (say the parents were laid off and they don't have any other place to go), the goverment is never that quick to reach for a solution.

OK, enough with history... paying up front is usually good to cover for any house damages and being an expat will obviously NOT make you a risky business. It's not like you are here to squat or anything.

Again, it's not a joke and it all comes to negotiation. If you don't like it, look for a more reasonable owner.
You've misunderstood billsfan - when said in the context above 'what a joke' is not meant literally. It's more an expression of exasperation or frustration with something. And I already found a reasonable owner.

I understand the history lesson, but like I said previously it's basically a problem of a lack of trust.....even of a legally binding contract!
 
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