If You Were The Next President Of Argentina

Pensador

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What steps would take to bring change to the economy, poverty, criminal justice and corruption?
 

jbeas176

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you start with opening the trade restrictions. free trade impossible but open the doors and reduce the taxes and tariffs.
 

Bajo_cero2

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you start with opening the trade restrictions. free trade impossible but open the doors and reduce the taxes and tariffs.

Right, but the op was about to reduce poverty, not to increase it. More imports means less work here. If you do some research, this is exactly what Videla did and he destroyed the local industry that was very strong until 1976.

http://www.pagina12....2013-05-18.html

At the same time, you need usd to pay for these imported goods, 3 years maximum there is no one single usd left at the Central Bank, and then what?

Here is an example of what happends then: 196% of inflation on june 1989. Yes, 196% was only was month inflacion.
http://es.wikipedia....gentina_de_1989

Peron solved the problem of lack of USD with simple barter with Italy and Spain. This worked out with a State monopoly of foreign commerce. Instead of selling the weat at 135 usd, he sold it at 400 and he paid 200 to the farmers. Is free market better? right! for who?

It is clear that to continue paying the foreign debt has to be a priority and to produce local instead of importing and, if possible, to export.
 

Pensador

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You say, you are -supposedly- a "thinker"

Ksters are mindless bumblers and igorance is the darkness you call light and under achieving your is the sign post of everything you stand for. Poverty is the fruit of your insanity. Pleace spare me.
 

thorsten

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Do what you are supposed to do as a president here: just open you pockets and let the money flow in :D
 

gpop

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Stimulate small - medium business development and ease trade restrictions to open exports (and imports...how many industries are strangled by inability to get a hold of necessary hardware and materials needed to continue their production).
Guarantee protection from crooked inspectors and cops in exchange for honest sales-tax reporting and payment, plus reduced over-all taxation for small businesses. Small businesses employ more people collectively than large corporations. If it's all legit, then AFIP ( a seriously audited and reformed AFIP) would probably collect more than their misguided reliance on soy crops.
Work training programs (not just putting people to work, but training them) to prepare , or retrain people for current and emerging industries.
Fire the entire police force once start fresh. Require all civil servants to re-apply for the jobs they hold and be evaluated by a 3rd party auditor.

...all the above as a start.
 

ben

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The problem is the same as in the political system: institutions like democracy only have even a chance of working if they're backed by a stable system, traditions, informed (to some extent) voting public, and that in the absence of these, democracy starts to look more like Iraq and various Arab Spring countries.

So too it is with economic systems. Liberal trade policies only work if the local economy is likely to be able to adapt and work with the global one. If quality used clothes, let alone new, can be sold alongside local stuff which loses both on quality and price, local industry will either adapt or go out of business. If the entire cultural makeup of the country makes it next to impossible to adapt without enormous pain being inflicted for close to a generation, then liberal trade policies, even though they normally ultimately work, won't (or perhaps one can argue that they 'ultimately' will, but that the cost in the interim is too high).

Protectionism ultimately won't work, and it's akin to painkillers and short-term medication keeping the patient alive and conscious for long enough to die from cancer as opposed to a brain aneurism, but it is what it is.

Videla to the best of my understanding (and I am no expert) simply brought in Western-style trade policies without dismantling the populist gimme culture that predated Peron and was greatly exacerbated by him on his watch. (Not to say that doing that was necessarily easy or even possible). This is the same as deposing Saddam, Assad or Gaddafi and expecting a stable democratic process to take root.

The problem is that in a much more global economy than 40 years ago, there are not many modern equivalents of bartering wheat with Spain. There is China, yes, and Iran - which Argentina is unlikely to want to deal with. Wait, what?
 

camberiu

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What steps would take to bring change to the economy, poverty, criminal justice and corruption?
Until the people of Argentina change, you can swap presidents as much as you want and nothing will improve. Argentina can't be fixed from the top down.
But when even the most well educated here clamors for a ridiculous amount of central planning and protectionism in the form of the semi fascist/communist model of Peron, you can be sure that Argentina is going nowhere fast.
 
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