Info on traveling to Brazil

steveinba

Registered
Any US citizens in Argentina know what the best way is to get a visa to travel to Brazil? Is there an office somewhere in BA where I can go to apply for the visa?
 

Kushluk

Registered
Perhaps the Brazilian Embassy might be the place to go. It is on Carlos Pellegrini, 1400 ish. Although I feel I am stating the obvious.

I think the fee is 120 USD.
 

bradlyhale

Registered
I'm a pro when it comes to traveling to Brazil. :p I've had the displeasure of having to get two visas with Brazil, one in the states and one here. I also had to go to their Federal Police Department and get an extension. What can I say? I love the Brazilian bureaucracy.

In Buenos Aires, you can go to the Consulate-General of Brazil. It's located at Carlos Pellegrini 1363, piso 5. Their hours are 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., Monday through Friday. On the day that you apply, make sure you arrive before 12:30 p.m. for the "interview," which really isn't an interview at all.

You will need:

PASSPORT, valid for six months at least

01 PASSPORT SIZE PHOTO (I'd bring 2 just in case. This seems to be a new rule, but I wouldn't be surprised if the consular staff wasn't all on the same page...)

A ROUNDTRIP TICKET TO BRAZIL (I've never had immigration ask me about my return ticket, but I'd have it to be safe...)

YOUR ADDRESS IN BRAZIL. If you're staying with a friend in Brazil, don't put his/her address. Book a hotel with a website that will refund the full amount, and bring a copy of that reservation with you. If you give a friend's address, they may ask you for a letter of sponsorship.

A BANK STATEMENT
identifying the account holder (CHECKING AND/OR SAVINGS ACCOUNT) - CURRENT and PREVIOUS MONTH, as well as the presentation of CREDIT CARDS. You may also have to present a WORK PROOF (employment contract or letter from employer) and EARNING STATEMENT (PAY CHECK);

A VISA APPLICATION FORM printed or machine typed, completely filled-out and signed by the applicant;
If STUDENT, original and copy of STUDENT CARD;

Payment of a PROCESSING FEE. Currently: 547.25 ARG.


Once you have all of those documents, you'll turn in everything. It usually takes them a few days to process the visa. They will give you a receipt, which you will have to take to Itaú and pay the fee. Once the fee is paid, they will process the visa.

The Consulate of Brazil in Buenos Aires can only give foreign nationals requiring a tourist visa a maximum of 90 days. You can get your visa extended by 6 months with the Brazil Federal Police. (If that's your plan, make sure your entry stamp is a 1 and not 2 to avoid a headache.)

You also have 90 days to enter the country after the visa has been issued. If you do not enter Brazil within 90 days of the date of issuance, the visa will expire.

Let me know if I can help with anything else! I speak Portuguese too... :p haha Good luck!
 

steveinba

Registered
Thanks Bradley. Sounds like an absolute nightmare :)
So if I book my ticket online, can I show them a copy of the itinerary? I haven't received paper tickets for a flight in years.

Also, I don't have proof of employment because I am self employed (freelance). Is this going to be a problem?

Thanks again for all the info!
 

DA

Registered
This is why i choose NOT to visit Brazil and their ridiculos visa requirements. The question is what happens if you do not have a visa while being there and what happens when you leave without having an entry visa???. I do know you can enter without a visa.
 

bradlyhale

Registered
The airline itinerary just has to be printed from the airline's website. I would make sure that you print the reservation from the website, and not your e-mail account. Make sure it also has the reservation code, and the "ida e volta" are on the printout.

In terms of employment, they really don't care so much about that. They just want to see that you have money in your bank account and a few credit cards so that they are sure you can support yourself in the country. I would bring not only a credit card (or more than one..more the merrier!) with you to the Consulate, but a print out from your credit card company showing the available credit. I would print a copy of your bank account summary (including last statement you have) and the credit card summary from the internet the morning of your appointment, just to ensure that they have the most recent documents.

DA, you can enter Brazil without a visa at one of the sleepy border towns, but that is illegal. If you get caught, you might as well say goodbye to ever coming into the country legally. Besides, they could make an example of you. Not a good idea... at all.

(It is worth noting that the U.S., Canada, and Australia are among the countries whose citizens are required to obtain a visa before traveling to Brazil. Citizens in the European Union and nearly all of the countries in Latin America are not required to obtain visas for travel and leisure to Brazil.)

The visa may be a hassle, but it is totally worth it.
 

steveinba

Registered
How do I get the 5 yr tourist visa? I would rather not have to do this again if I want to return to Brazil in the future.
 

DA

Registered
bradlyhale said:
DA, you can enter Brazil without a visa at one of the sleepy border towns, but that is illegal. If you get caught, you might as well say goodbye to ever coming into the country legally. Besides, they could make an example of you. Not a good idea... at all.

(It is worth noting that the U.S., Canada, and Australia are among the countries whose citizens are required to obtain a visa before traveling to Brazil. Citizens in the European Union and nearly all of the countries in Latin America are not required to obtain visas for travel and leisure to Brazil.)

The visa may be a hassle, but it is totally worth it.
I wasn't planning to enter brazil, but it does make you think when I read that the government there was going to grant all the illegals citizenship, that it would be less hassles to sneak in there and get a citizenship than applying for a tourist visa.:). Personally I think they are angry that they need a visa to go the the US and that is why they make it so hard to visit Brazil, unfortunately they are the ones losing a lot of revenue from tourists.
 

bradlyhale

Registered
The Brazilian Senate did authorize an amnesty for those who entered LEGALLY. In other words, you had to be documented by immigration to qualify. This is not a problem for most people in neighboring countries because all neighboring countries are associated with the MERCOSUR.

You are exactly right that their policies are rooted in reciprocity. I agree with you that they are losing a lot of revenue from tourists. But it's their policy, so we just have to deal with it.
 

bradlyhale

Registered
Steve -- a 5 year visa can only be obtained in the U.S. at the consulate serving the state in which you have residency. However, I've never received a 5 year visa. The maximum I have received is 1 year. Your chances might be higher if you don't reside in the jurisdiction of the Brazilian Consulate in Chicago....assuming you're a U.S. citizen.
 
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