Introduction/resident visa question

#1
Hi everyone,
This might be a bit on the early side, but I wanted to make an introduction as I've been perusing these threads periodically these days. I'm a 24 American relocating from NYC/London to work in finance for 2 years. I went to Argentina for a tango festival about a year and a half ago and loved the city, so I'm very excited to be heading back longer term.
My work is takig care of most of my emerging issues regarding the relocation, but I was wondering if any of you might be able to give me some advice. I have to apply for a resident visa instead of a work visa b/c of my being in London before heading to BsAs. My first question is this. To those of you Americans out there, any recommendations for getting the apostille for the birth certificate and criminal record? Secondly, regarding the criminal record, Argentina evidently wants it from the state level, but my state of residency only provides the county level. Any idea if the FBI record would be accepted?
I know these are boring, technical questions, but any insight would be appreciated! I've already read postings about places to live, hair salons, etc., so you all answered my more interesting questions before I was able to post them. :)
-Pri.
 
#2
Pri, To obtain a resident visa (visa rentista) you would need to prove "STABLE" income of about $900 USD per month from an irrevocable trust or an annuity. "Active" sources of income from a business (as well as money in the bank, cd's, mutual funds, rents, etc.) may qualify for this type of visa if you can show a history of the income and provide reasonable "proof" it will continue while you ARE LIVING IN ARGENTINA. If you are going to work and be paid here you will need a work visa.

I had my birth certificate and all documents receive the seal of the Apostille by the secretary of state in Illinois and sent to me in Argentina (where I did apply for and receive the resident visa). That was just over two years ago and migraciones here accepted a police report from my city of residence in Illinois, so I don't have any information about state or FBI reports, sorry.There are private companies on the web that can have docs receive the seal of apostille and sent them to you as well. If they have all of the docs, there is a flat fee which usually includes the shipping charge, but if you need "something else" you will end up paying again. A google search will lead you to a number of websites for this service.

USE THE SEARCH ENGINE OF THIS SITE for threads on this subject. There is a lot of additional information about translating and legalizing the docs here and getting the DNI.
 
#3
This post is very relevant to me and a particular question I have. I have a rentista visa and entered BA but left after a short time. My wife is having a baby and we won't be back for a while. In fact we may only be back a month or two before the first year of the visa expires and has to be renewed. Do you know if there is a minimum amount of time you have to be in the country during the year to be eligible to renew the rentista visa ? We went to such a lot of effort to get it that I would hate to jeopardise it.
thanks, any help is appreciated
Rhys
 
#4
I'm confused are you working at a job here or not? If you are why isn't your employer doing all this for you? If you are going to work why are you applying for a residency visa?
Frankly, if you aren't going to work and you plan on being here only 2 years I personally wouldn't bother with the hassle and bother of getting a residency visa. You'll save time, frustration, and money if you don't.
 
#5
I have to apply for the residency visa once I arrive because of complications with the work visa. Yes, the logical thing would be for me to apply for the work permit from London, but because I'm undergoing training in London and will be a "business visitor" on a tourist visa, I am ineligible to apply for the work visa from the UK (gotta love bureaucratic dictums). I get paid through an offshore account, so the matter of being paid in Argentina is circumvented.

Steveinbsas, thanks for the info about migraciones accepting the local police report. I'll be taking care of the apostille stuff this week and your insights were quite helpful. I'm sending the documents to BsAs ahead of time so they can be translated in the country. If you don't mind asking (so I can verify what my employer has told me...) how long did it take between application for the residency visa and receipt? I was told by the relocation staff that if all of the documents were in order, that it should only take "a few days."

Stanexpat - yes, I will be working and yes, my employer is handling this. Nonetheless, I've learned that even the best of HR people can get confused, so I wanted to reach out to the online community here, as I'm sure I'm not the first one to deal with this type of situation.
 
#6
Pri,With the additional information you provided in your last post, its clear that you aren't applying for the "visia rentista" so the financial requirements I noted would not apply. I am not familiar with the "work visitor" visa, but I do know there are many types of visas. Ten are listed at the following site:
http://www.mininterior.gov.ar/migraciones/radicacion_e_mercosur.aspPerhaps a business visitor visa is a variation of the migrant worker visa (#1)?
I applied for and received my visa almost two years ago and, as I noted in my previous post, a police report from my city of residence in the US was accepted at that time. I don't know if this has changed in the interim. I did not apply for the "report" in person. I faxed my signed request directly to the police department of my "home town" (fortunately a small city--I don't know if you could do this in Chicago, LA, or NYC). The letter I asked them to write (one page) included my name (spelled out in full), date and place of birth, my US passport number, and my personal home residence address (matching my current state driver's license (a photocopy of which I included on the one page fax). Argentine immigration won't care about the DL number, but it was necessary to get the police report which should also be notarized before receiving the seal of apostille.
 
#8
1. The law requires that you stay in the country at least half of the term authorized for residency (if you got 1 year you should stay 6 months at least) BUT as of June 18, 2008 the inspector of "renewals" (prorrogas de permanencia) are not currently checking this requisite (at least not with my clients), but you never know when they will start enforcing minimum stay (keep fingers crossed ;)
This post is very relevant to me and a particular question I have. I have a rentista visa and entered BA but left after a short time. My wife is having a baby and we won't be back for a while. In fact we may only be back a month or two before the first year of the visa expires and has to be renewed. Do you know if there is a minimum amount of time you have to be in the country during the year to be eligible to renew the rentista visa ? We went to such a lot of effort to get it that I would hate to jeopardise it.
thanks, any help is appreciated
Rhys[/quote]
 
#9
As of June 18, 2008 the issuance of residencies filed at the Immigration Office in BA takes 40 days from the day of filing BUT that same day you get a "residencia precaria" that allows you to work etc, and that you will exchange for your "residencia temporaria" after those 40 days.
If you don't mind asking (so I can verify what my employer has told me...) how long did it take between application for the residency visa and receipt? I was told by the relocation staff that if all of the documents were in order, that it should only take "a few days."
 
#10
Thank you, this is all very helpful. Steve, we may take you up on your offer of a translator. My Spanish is coming along but not at a level to discuss immigration intricacies. As I mentioned we have a rentista visa but are in the UK at the moment having a baby. Combination of business and not being able to fly until the baby has had its vaccinations means we will only get back into BA 3 months before the year expires (hope they don't check how long we have been there in the year).
A question I have is that when we apply for the rentista extension will I be able to leave BA briefly (wife and family will stay) during the 40 days (?) it takes to process the application ? I have a separate passport if they need to hold onto the main one but I need to finish up some business before settling down in BA properly but don't want to upset the Migraciones people.
Any help appreciated
Rhys