Married To An Argentine With No Dni Yet And Traveling Abroad

Mari Yagami

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As I have recently been seeing a lot of posts regarding people being denied entry at EZE I was wondering if anyone knows what to expect for my current situation.

I am an Argentinian and my husband is an American citizen. We got married in Argentina on June last year (within his last prorroga period, which had been requested specially for that purpose). Since then, we had to wait for a bit before starting his DNI process, as we didn't know if my work would require us to travel to the US for a short period of time, and after that did not happen, we attempted to get his criminal record from the FBI once and the fingerprint sheets got lost in the trip (our bad). Since then we have decided NOT to get him a DNI, as we have started gathering everything for my Green Card application.

Now - my company wants me to travel to the US for a short period, which would actually be perfect for us to avoid having to ship the paperwork for the GC internationally and all that jazz. We know we will have to pay the overstay fee, and we are fine with this. My question is, with him being legally married to me (by an Argentinian judge, no less!) is it reasonable to fear he could be denied entry when we attempt to return?
 

citygirl

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I highly doubt it. There have been a handful of cases we've heard about out of how many people that travel in/out of Argentina every day? Easiest thing is just to bring your marriage license with you and tell them the paperwork is in process.
 

ben

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When we did this, we had no problem whatsoever with migraciones, but the airline wanted proof I'm leaving, wanted me to buy a refundable ticket etc.

As city girl said, the only cases we've heard of problems were serial colonia runners, not people who are actually processing residency.
 

irina

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Ya'll will be fine. I had the same situation, I couldn't start the process because I had a couple US trips coming up that I knew would invalidate my US background check.
I brought my red marriage book, it doesn't have any legal standing on whether you can get in or not but I brought it just in case they didn't believe me. But actually everyone I came across in immigration (on my in and out of EZE) gave me a huge smile and congratulations.
 

Mari Yagami

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Thank you guys - I understand none of us (or most at least) are lawyers, but hearing from people who have been in this situation is a great relief.

:)
 

MadelineB

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Hi everyone,

I have a related question and I didn't even foresee this as a complication. My fiance is AR and I am a US Citizen. We and I are getting married in March of 2015 and five months later we are planning to travel to the US for a 2 months. My plan was to begin my DNI process immediately after our March wedding in AR (my FBI background check will still be valid by this point), but if I travel back to the US while my paperwork is still being processed will that create a problem?

Any insights would be very helpful!
 

La Fleur

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As I have recently been seeing a lot of posts regarding people being denied entry at EZE I was wondering if anyone knows what to expect for my current situation.....

My question is, with him [US citizen] being legally married to me (by an Argentinian judge, no less!) is it reasonable to fear he could be denied entry when we attempt to return?

I don't have any experience with the marriage situation. But since he is the spouse of an Argentine citizen he is entitled to citizenship here himself - he just needs to apply for it. So I suggest you do as others suggested - carry a copy of your marriage certificate and maybe even a photo of the wedding if you have one.

I left BA for a holiday two years after applying for citizenship (but before I got it). At the time my visa was also two years out of date, so of course I paid the overstayer fee. On the way out I got a serious lecture about how I would not be allowed back in. I showed them a photocopy of my application for citizenship (date stamped by the court) and said that my lawyer had told me that if I wanted to be a real Argentine I needed to learn patience! The immigration guy laughed a lot and waved me through. I think he also made some note in the computer but I can't be sure. On the way back in I just got waved through with a smile.

It is dangerous to jump to conclusions from one or only a few experiences, but I think that if you can show them you are in the process of doing things properly (and maybe even if you humanise it) they leave you alone. In your case you will need to say that you have come back to process your husband's residency (or citizenship).

Someone else in the forum might be able to give you the exact part of the law that states his entitlement to each so that you could have a copy with you.

Good luck.
La Fleur
 

ghost

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One pill makes you bigger and one pill makes you small.
 
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