number of tourists to Argentina

garryl

Registered
#1
Number of tourists that visiting Argentina has been steady up over the recent year, from 5.5m in 2010 to 6.6m in 2017.
That's not bad. If you are in hotel business or have a few airbnb units in Argentina, this number is quite small for
a country of this size, compared to visitor number of:

France -- 83m
Spain -- 76m
Italy -- 56 m
Greece -- 33m in 2018

(US 76m, China 60m Germany 36m Mexico)
 
#2
Number of tourists that visiting Argentina has been steady up over the recent year, from 5.5m in 2010 to 6.6m in 2017.
That's not bad. If you are in hotel business or have a few airbnb units in Argentina, this number is quite small for
a country of this size, compared to visitor number of:

France -- 83m
Spain -- 76m
Italy -- 56 m
Greece -- 33m in 2018

(US 76m, China 60m Germany 36m Mexico)
Surprised that so many come from Greece. I didn't think many Greeks could afford to travel, especially so far from Greece.
 

Ries

Registered
#6
Whats interesting to me is that Tourism numbers, TO Argentina, have been pretty much the same for years. We have seen inflation, we have seen locals losing purchasing power, we have seen everybody complain about how expensive everything has gotten- but Tourism is still relatively steady.
Admittedly, a lot of Argentine tourism numbers are for things like 2 days in BA on the way to Antarctica, or trekking in El Calafate, or fly fishing in Patagonia. And, thus, Portenos dont see a lot of that money, or the tourists, much.
But the overall numbers of visitors keeps slowly going up.
On this forum, we hear grumbling from expats- but even at the expat peak, 2004-2008, when it was really cheap here, expats, in total, were a pretty small number, compared to 5 million tourists a year, who do things like come on a cruise ship, get bussed to San Telmo, and go back to sleep on the ship.
 

garryl

Registered
#7
Whats interesting to me is that Tourism numbers, TO Argentina, have been pretty much the same for years. We have seen inflation, we have seen locals losing purchasing power, we have seen everybody complain about how expensive everything has gotten- but Tourism is still relatively steady.
Admittedly, a lot of Argentine tourism numbers are for things like 2 days in BA on the way to Antarctica, or trekking in El Calafate, or fly fishing in Patagonia. And, thus, Portenos dont see a lot of that money, or the tourists, much.
But the overall numbers of visitors keeps slowly going up.
On this forum, we hear grumbling from expats- but even at the expat peak, 2004-2008, when it was really cheap here, expats, in total, were a pretty small number, compared to 5 million tourists a year, who do things like come on a cruise ship, get bussed to San Telmo, and go back to sleep on the ship.
Your observation is correct. The number is steady. The airlines do not see a big increase in business, that's perhaps United killed one of the routes after merging with Continental. 5 million a year, is not a small number, but not significant either . One of the reasons is that it's too far for Americans in west coast and Europeans to visit, which can be a good thing, makes Argentina unique, unlike Mexico, that is full dumb American tourists.
 

mmoon

Active Member
#8
Your observation is correct. The number is steady. The airlines do not see a big increase in business, that's perhaps United killed one of the routes after merging with Continental. 5 million a year, is not a small number, but not significant either . One of the reasons is that it's too far for Americans in west coast and Europeans to visit, which can be a good thing, makes Argentina unique, unlike Mexico, that is full dumb American tourists.
Definitely it is challenging to get to Argentina. Few nonstop flights from only a few cities in the US, always very expensive. The reverse seasons from the US, Canada and Europe must have a big impact too, especially for those with school-age children. Not many people want to leave their summer vacation to head to winter.
 

garryl

Registered
#9
Definitely it is challenging to get to Argentina. Few nonstop flights from only a few cities in the US, always very expensive. The reverse seasons from the US, Canada and Europe must have a big impact too, especially for those with school-age children. Not many people want to leave their summer vacation to head to winter.
Yes, the ticket is always expensive, never there is a break. It's cheaper to fly to any part of Europe from US cities than to Argentina. You pay more to visit a poor man's Europe than real Europe :)
 

Ries

Registered
#10
Actually, starting at the end of last year, there is a direct flight from Los Angeles to BA. Thats a great thing for me, as I live in the PNW in the USA, and it usually takes me at least 24 hours, door to door.
 
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