Pilão Coffee?

bradlyhale

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I know the import of foreign goods is dicey right now. But has anyone seen Pilão coffee (Brazil) in any stores here?

I knew I should have brought a canister of Folgers with me. (Yes, I'd even drink Folgers over the stuff here.)
 

Napoleon

Registered
I've never heard of Pilão coffee, so I can't say for sure.

1 option is Starbucks House Blend. (Then have it ground.)

Another option is that Establecimiento General de Cafe: http://www.estcafe.com.ar/ It should be good, because it's roasted here, but really, it still kind of sucks. But some on here like it.

There is also a coffee place on Corrientes (I think... or Corodoba) between Reconquista & San Martin. It's on the NORTH side of the street. (I'll let you look at the sun and figure out which side that is.) I bought some coffee there (it's a cafe & whole bean seller) and the beans looked and smelled great... but they kind of tasted like crap and they didn't grind up that well in my coffee grinder. It's like the beans were exceptionally hard. Disappointing crap.

Instead of Folgers, I brought 3 pounds of coffee back from the States from one of those local coffee houses that are popping up in ever medium to large city across the country. (Typical bio: "He was was a lawyer who hated his job, she was in pharmaceutical sales and hated being on the road all day, so they quite their jobs and started roasting their own coffee...")

Coffee should be consumed soon after roasting and if it's not, it should be sealed and frozen. Well, I bought my coffee 2 1/2 months ago and I haven't frozen it and it still beats the shit out of the crap they sell in this town. Sorry, I'm not sharing, but really I would say that Starbucks House Blend is better than nearly anything else you can get in this city and it's about AR$30/250gr.

Good luck.
 

bradlyhale

Registered
Last year, I remember how much of a nightmare coffee was here. So when I went to Brazil, I bought this Pilão stuff -- it's amazing.

Anyway, I just got back here yesterday. I thought that if I had some space in my suitcases, I would buy some Folgers and bring it along. (More clothes won!) Folgers isn't great. However, compared to the stuff here, it's truly the best coffee in the world.

I bought the Morenita stuff this morning. I'm not joking when I say that it took about 4 cups of the stuff to get rid of my caffeine-withdrawal headache. A cup of Folgers takes care of it almost instantly.

I think i'll check out Starbucks. I wasn't sure if it was sold here or not, but Starbucks isn't bad at all. Mil gracias!
 

mini

Registered
Try Bonfide. The sell it both at the supermarket and at there own stores. The store people say the one in the supermarket is not the same, but they aren't bad. It's a more Brazilian style coffee. I get the Sigafredo also at the disco when I run out of my stash. It's good too, but it's an Italian roast. So different from the kind you are looking for. But still yummy.
 

elhombresinnombre

Registered
I think I've confessed before (and so far I haven't been expelled from the board) but I like coffee the way that it's made in Argentina. Bonafide is good and they have different varieties, but I think I like Cabrales better. I'm not impressed by supermarket own-brand coffees but if you haven't actually tried Cabrales or Bonafide I'd recommend giving them a go before giving up entirely on locally produced coffee. I know some people reel away in horror at the thought of coffee that had been 'torrado con azucar' but that no more means that sugar has been added to your coffee grounds than oak smoked ham means wood shavings have been mixed into your meat.
 

mini

Registered
elhombresinnombre said:
I think I've confessed before (and so far I haven't been expelled from the board) but I like coffee the way that it's made in Argentina. Bonafide is good and they have different varieties, but I think I like Cabrales better. I'm not impressed by supermarket own-brand coffees but if you haven't actually tried Cabrales or Bonafide I'd recommend giving them a go before giving up entirely on locally produced coffee. I know some people reel away in horror at the thought of coffee that had been 'torrado con azucar' but that no more means that sugar has been added to your coffee grounds than oak smoked ham means wood shavings have been mixed into your meat.
Cabrales is also good. I do like it better (when made at the cafe) than Bonfide. Although, I've never bought Cabrales to make a home. Where can you buy it? It's definitely tastes like Brazilian or Colombian coffee. I really dislike the coffee that has been roasted with sugar. It's adds a horrible burnt bitter yucky taste. blah!
 

elhombresinnombre

Registered
You'll find Cabrales in your local Chinese, Disco, Carrefour etc. It is roasted in sugar - but then so is Bonafide - but as far as I can tell, this just serves to caramelise the roast and I'm not aware of sugar being added during or after the grinding process. I'm willing to be corrected on any of this - but I still like it!
 

mini

Registered
elhombresinnombre said:
You'll find Cabrales in your local Chinese, Disco, Carrefour etc. It is roasted in sugar - but then so is Bonafide - but as far as I can tell, this just serves to caramelise the roast and I'm not aware of sugar being added during or after the grinding process. I'm willing to be corrected on any of this - but I still like it!
If it was roasted in sugar then that is probably why I passed on it at the store. The Bonafide that I buy is not. At least it doesn't say it is like the others do.

It tastes burnt to me, not caramelized. But I could be wrong about the sugar thing & and the ones I've tried that have been roasted in sugar just started with really bad coffee or are just not good quality, ie. it was other factors that made it yuk! I'll have to explore this a bit more.
 

mini

Registered
I just checked the Cabrales coffee that I buy does not have sugar. It's the purple package & it's about 2 pesos cheaper than the one with sugar... go figure.
 
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