Plättar (Mini Pancakes)

Tilda

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I'm turning to the international community with a question. I make mini pancakes for my kids using a special frying pan so that I get six 10 cm diameter pancakes per go. My son asked if this was something specific to Sweden since his friends don't know about it.

Is there anyone out there who has this in their culture?

Thank you,
Tilda
 

wineguy999

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Go into many restaurants that serve breakfast look for "silver dollar pancakes"...you'll get something smaller than 10cm. More of a southern thing, but I've seen them all over.
 

syngirl

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I know what you are talking about but never used one -- they do sell in North America though.

It does make me consider picking one up next time I'm back home, though I've previously just used cookie cutters to make shapes.
 

Girino

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I had them in Denmark for breakfast, they were called Aebleskiver.



In the area of Mantua, Italy, we use the same mold (actually, slightly larger) to cook salty bread that we cut in half and stuff with hams and cheeses, they are called tigelle.

 

Tilda

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Sleuth, it's far to your house, but if you decide to take the family for a vacation to Villa la Angostura I'll gladly rent you a house and make plättar.

Interesting to hear about the silver dollar pancakes. The pancakes that I make aren't as thick as the American, more like the ones for cannelloni.
 

Tilda

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Serafina, the Danish ones must have baking powder to rise like that, don't they? They look delicious.
 

Girino

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I definitely think so, Tilda! I have never tried to make them myself since I don't have the mold.
Yesterday I made waffles and of course I used baking powder. They turned out delicious. (and for Sleuth - yes, I did have maple syrup from Canada on them)

My grandma used to make palačinke, a specialty of eastern Europe known in Austria/Germany as palatschinken, in eastern Italy as panicelli, which is a sort of crepe, but smaller in size in with a lighter batter. They can be eaten folded in 4 or rolled up as cannelloni. In the former case, you eat them with a fork and a knife, in the latter, with your hands.



They are about the size of a plate and can be stuffed with either jam or nutella or a cream spread with ricotta, sugar and lemon (that is the one my great-grandma did). Sometimes they are served with beaten cream, a scoop of ice cream, fresh fruits, etc.

They don't call for baking powder since they have to stay flat, but as a trick to make them lighter and melting in your mouth, you can add seltz or beer or water with gas to make them fluffier. They are fried in butter.

When eaten with your hands, you have to use your little finger to keep the "tail" upward so that the filling doesn't spill out. I wasn't able to find a picture because I can't google in the relevant languages (Croatian, German). I remember that even in Prague they had something like this, I am sure Esteban can fill us in.

I prepare them with a simple crepe pan (I actually use two and juggle between them to make them faster).
 

wineguy999

Registered
Interesting to hear about the silver dollar pancakes. The pancakes that I make aren't as thick as the American, more like the ones for cannelloni.
The first time I was invited to an Argentine house for "canelones", I stood around wondering where the pasta was, but was excited about the idea of crepes for dessert.

Breakfast is served...

 
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