Question About Teaching English (Private Schools)

jking1904

Registered
Joined
Dec 6, 2014
Messages
9
Likes
7
Hi everyone,

I was wondering if anyone had any information about teaching English at private school as a foreign language teacher at a bilingual/international school, not just odd jobs/language institutes. So far what I have heard is peak hiring is in March, you need to contact headmasters directly for information on job openings, and you need a college degree as well as a TEFL certification. I also have read different information about further certifications; some say you have to register with the Ministry of Education, however other sources say it doesn't really matter.

If anyone can confirm this info or throw in some more tips, that would be great!
 

Girino

Registered
Joined
Jan 1, 2014
Messages
2,616
Likes
2,118
The school year has just finished (or is about to finish), so this would be a good time to apply, unless the headmaster really did their homeworks in advance.
 

Tilda

Registered
Joined
Dec 17, 2013
Messages
248
Likes
184
I would get my CV in now, but don't expect an answer until March. Then resend in March to remind them that you are available.

4 years ago I worked at a private school and I didn't have to get my overseas degree approved by a local instant. This was because only one of three teachers per grade was 'official'. But, I did have to have a degree as a classroom teacher. We all did. Some teacher who had been teaching for 30 years had to go get one to be able to continue working.

If you get a job as an assistant you probably don't need a degree... But, the rules are changing fast.
 

jking1904

Registered
Joined
Dec 6, 2014
Messages
9
Likes
7
Yea I've gone ahead and sent in my resume including teaching experience to some international schools/bilingual private schools for school age children, however I wasn't sure if it was even a possibility for me...I'll have a BA in political science and a TEFL but since my degree isn't in teaching specifically, I wasn't sure how likely it would be I'll hear something from any schools. Thank you for the advice though, super helpful! I'll go ahead and keep sending out my CV
 

Crema Americana

Registered
Joined
Sep 18, 2011
Messages
1,404
Likes
1,145
Do you have a DNI / residency? That might keep some potential employers from calling you. Having a teacher off the books can be a big risk.
 

jking1904

Registered
Joined
Dec 6, 2014
Messages
9
Likes
7
No I haven't applied for anything like that, I kind of thought that process wouldn't start until I was extended an actual offer from a school. I was really interested in Lincoln Int'l school because it is an "American based" school system, so I'm sure that they have their own procedure for hiring overseas applicants as far as visa/residency goes
 

sergio

Registered
Joined
Mar 25, 2007
Messages
3,453
Likes
1,851
There are only two international schools that I know of: Lincoln and BAICA. My guess is that Lincoln is more likely to be fussy about US teacher certification than BAICA.

Bilingual schools are all over the place, though there are only a handful of so-called "top" bilingual schools (Saint Andrews, Northlands etc). These are the ones that hire teachers from abroad (there is a strong preference for British teachers) and pay better that the other places. There is a big pay/benefit gap, though, between someone hired from England and a British or American teacher hired locally.

Only the official Spanish language curriculum is recognized by the Ministry of Education. The courses taught in English (this can include history, science etc) are above and beyond the requirements of the Education Ministry.

English teachers in the bilingual schools may be expected to teach literature as well as ESL type classes, especially in the better schools. There will also be jobs for other than English teaching positions -- math, history etc.

I don't think there is any official requirement about teaching certificates for teachers from abroad teaching in the non-official curriculum. I believe that is up to the school but from what I understand the more prestigious bilingual schools look for "qualified teachers" from the UK mostly.

If I were you I would send in applications to every school you can think of. Something may turn up.
 
Top